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How can I protect a new SSD drive from virus? C: drive.


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#1 harryhh

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Posted 05 July 2018 - 01:13 PM

Hello Folks,

 

I'm going to be putting a new SSD drive in my computer as my C:Windows 10 drive. At this time I'm thinking I won't put anything else on it.

 

Is there a way, or is it even feasible, to prevent anything except windows from writing to the disk? I want to prevent viruses. I'm even thinking that I want to try to prevent those root directory viruses.

 

I'm hoping that 'official' windows stuff would write to the disk, but nothing else without my permission. Is this even feasible or is there just too much stuff that would want to write to the C drive that I would be constantly having to give permission to do so?

 

Harry


Can't keep up with the computer stuff anymore. It's getting beyond me.  :mellow:


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#2 britechguy

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Posted 05 July 2018 - 05:33 PM

It is not feasible as there is constant activity from the OS on the boot disc, C: in this case.

 

If you're worried about avoiding infections you would be far better off using your time to develop safe cyberspace interaction skills.  Our own Quietman7  has written extensively on the subject of security.  The following are three "must reads" in my opinion:

 
 
 
 
The fact of the matter is that virtually all infections are the direct result of the computer user's own actions.  There are a very few exceptions, but they are very few.

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#3 harryhh

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Posted 05 July 2018 - 07:50 PM

Thanks britechguy.

 

I will look this stuff over.


Can't keep up with the computer stuff anymore. It's getting beyond me.  :mellow:


#4 rp88

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Posted 06 July 2018 - 11:23 AM

Just to clarify, harryhh, viruses won't damage your lovely new SSD drive. They'll damage the data you value which is saved onto the drive, and they'll damage your privacy if they do things like keylogging. Rather than trying to make sure that viruses cannot write to the drive the important thing is to prevent viruses in the first place by taking good defensive measures and to have plenty of separate offline backups of any files which matter to you. If a virus infects a drive, excepting some very weird extremely rare very machine specific viruses which might try to write to the firmware of the drive (such horrors are mainly experimental concepts for now), then the drive can simply be wiped clean and new data written, the vital bit is ensuring you've got a clean copy of the data to rewrite and that if any infection happens you know about it immediately so it doesn't get time to spy on you doing anything private. Alongside those tips on security I would throw in a mention for NoScript, it's a bit strange to get used to but if you browse with firefox it gives you extremely good security against that rarer but scarier type of infection which can happen by driveby exploit (that is to say without user interaction).
Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB




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