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Incorrect user name or password


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9 replies to this topic

#1 The-Administrater

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Posted 02 July 2018 - 02:26 AM

I'd forgot my username and password. So when entering them in by guessing, how would I know which one is incorrect? Thing is I knew my username but not the exact spelling.

 

Fortunately on this occasion I came across an old email containing my username (plus the email account associated with this name) so I could reset it. I was about to make a new username. I even choose an obscure moon of Neptune to use......name was taken lol!



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#2 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 02 July 2018 - 06:33 PM

Generally, if you get into a system your password and username were correct, if you didn't, they weren't.

 

Chris Cosgrove



#3 PerspectiveObjective

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Posted 15 July 2018 - 04:23 PM

Does anyone else put hints in their bookmark names?  I also log pretty much everything w/ sometimes pseudo passwords that basically only I would recognize, toooooooo much copy pasting but sometimes people wonder how I remember things, I don't, the systems do.


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#4 SeeEmpty

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Posted 13 August 2018 - 07:56 AM

If you're able to tell whether your user name or password is incorrect from the message displayed to you, then the message is giving away too much information.

 

It is suppose to be vague to make guessing harder.  :)



#5 cafejose

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Posted 13 August 2018 - 11:30 AM

Make a traditionally manually written record.  Be sure to change this whenever you change your password.



#6 britechguy

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Posted 13 August 2018 - 11:42 AM

I get how this situation comes to be, particularly for accounts that are "ancient" and have been seldom used for years.

 

That being said, I completely fail to understand why anyone would not be using a password manager these days, even if just for record keeping.   There are several excellent open source or free password managers.  I've been using Password Safe for a number of years now along with its Android clone (and one exists for iOS, too).  If you set it up such that your actual encrypted password safe file is on a cloud service, e.g., Google Drive or Dropbox, all of your devices can access the same password safe, so if you make a change, whether update, addition, or deletion, on one of your devices it will instantly be reflected when you access via another device.

 

I have nothing against paper lists that are under tight physical control, but these are also useless when you're away from them, whereas a password manager that uses a shared password safe file is not.  The Android and iOS clones of Password Safe also have a companion app, PasswdSafe Sync, that will sync a hidden copy of your cloud-based file locally so that in the event you do not have off-device access it will fall back to the local copy until it does.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

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#7 Booh-kitty

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Posted 16 August 2018 - 04:24 PM

I create passwords based on things only a very few people know about me. Even if someone has knowledge of little known facts about me, they would have to figure out how my cryptic mind works.

 

I don't like the idea of storing my passwords in any digital form. Not saved in clouds, in security software, not my PC or my external drive that is rarely connected to my PC. 

 

For sites that have ANY personal information, or a user name that could potentially identify who I am to people who are familiar with me passwords are generally cryptic and very long. The pin for my bank card is many digits longer than most.


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#8 britechguy

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Posted 16 August 2018 - 05:53 PM

I don't like the idea of storing my passwords in any digital form.

 

And if you have the memory, and persistent memory, to be able to do what you say you do there is no doubt that this is the ideal method.  If everyone could do it that's what every security expert would wholeheartedly recommend.   You're already creating strong passwords, which is a huge part of the equation to begin with.

 

For those of us who have so many accounts that there's no way we can keep track of the passwords for all of them, and particularly the infrequently used ones, a password manager with strong encryption is a godsend.   If someone can manage to decrypt the password safe file I store on the cloud then they won't find too terribly much of great value to anyone but me.  There are a few things, though . . . 


Edited by britechguy, 16 August 2018 - 06:01 PM.

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#9 Booh-kitty

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Posted 17 August 2018 - 12:45 AM

..... There are a few things, though...........

 

Passwords for sites that have those things are the ones I guard fiercely and don't keep stored anywhere. Luckily for me, there aren't that many for me to keep track of. I also have them set up to send me a text message with a pin to validate who I am.

 

One person I know stores only portions of passwords electronically. A majority of the password is stored in the browser. When he goes to the site, he has to enter the missing 4 or 5 characters to log in. And the missing characters aren't necessarily the last characters of the password.

 

I've been extra, extra cautious since the days of Compuserve and AOL. I chatted with someone a few times. A couple of weeks later, he showed up where I worked. I didn't tell him very much about myself, but apparently enough. It freaked me out!

 

I make very little personal information available digitally. When the FB scandal started up, I wasn't worried about too much of my stuff because there wasn't much to steal. I'm sure someone could come up with profile based on conversations, likes, groups I belong to etc., but there would be no name, pictures or location to go with it.

 

But then there is the i.p. address and probably other things I have no idea of.....


Edited by Booh-kitty, 17 August 2018 - 12:48 AM.

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#10 britechguy

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Posted 17 August 2018 - 08:50 AM

Well, one can use a password manager to maintain partial passwords where enough is entered for your memory to be jogged but not enough for anyone else to be likely to fill in the blanks.

 

Since I've never, ever, been an "every single site must have its own password" person, particularly for sites such as, say, this one where the worst that could happen is someone would get in and start posting uncharacteristic messages, I tend to keep just part of the password as when I see that part I know what the rest is.  I have a collection of about 10 "multi-site" passwords that I've somehow kept track of which goes with which site for those sites I use consistently.

 

Again, it all comes back to what works for you (the generic you).  We're all "special snowflakes" when it comes to how our memories work and our needs with regard to supporting same.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 





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