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Marketing firm exposes 340 million users' records on unsecured server


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#1 JohnC_21

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Posted 29 June 2018 - 07:28 AM

Earlier this month, security researcher Vinny Troia discovered that Exactis, a data broker based in Palm Coast, Florida, had exposed a database that contained close to 340 million individual records on a publicly accessible server. The haul comprises close to 2 terabytes of data that appears to include personal information on hundreds of millions of American adults, as well as millions of businesses. While the precise number of individuals included in the data isn't clear—and the leak doesn't seem to contain credit card information or Social Security numbersit does go into minute detail for each individual listed, including phone numbers, home addresses, email addresses, and other highly personal characteristics for every name. The categories range from interests and habits to the number, age, and gender of the person's children.

https://www.wired.com/story/exactis-database-leak-340-million-records/



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#2 Kellysi

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Posted 29 June 2018 - 09:09 AM

So I am just wondering whats the use then if you protec your computer and someone else you trust leaks the information?



#3 JohnC_21

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Posted 29 June 2018 - 10:09 AM

Unfortunately, today you cannot do anything about a company being hacked and your information taken. An example would be the Equifax hack. The purpose of protecting your computer is preventing malware from steeling your login passwords for the sites you visit along with any banking trojans that can do serious damage. If a bank is hacked and any moneys are lost you are not liable for the loss but if you are personally hacked and do not inform the bank in a timely manner then you may be responsible for any money lost.



#4 britechguy

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Posted 29 June 2018 - 11:01 AM

So I am just wondering whats the use then if you protect your computer and someone else you trust leaks the information?

 

Several things here:

 

1.  The verb "leaks," as used, carries the direct implication of surreptitious release, with intention, on the part of an entity that has the information.  Being hacked is the diametrical opposite of leaking.  Even if the server was unsecured, which was just plain stupid and could easily be the result of human error, it's clear that the intent was not to share that information.

 

2.  Theft has been a part of every age of human existence.  It makes sense to take whatever precautions you can over domains that you control to make theft more difficult.

 

3.  It's irrelevant whether one trusts a given entity or not.   Data aggregation and sale has been a part of the cyber age since shortly after it dawned.  Huge amounts of this information are part of the public record, while others are often freely offered by folks, mostly via social media of one sort or another.  When people (not necessarily you, but in general) willingly "put their business on the cyber-street" it's entirely unreasonable to expect that those who can make a quick buck not to notice.

 

4. Theft of data stores is now with us since those have value.   And no matter what is done to secure them there will be someone else trying to figure out how to defeat that security.   It's always been a cat and mouse game, and always shall be.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

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