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Can I transfer apps & files onto laptop, install OS, return apps/files again??


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#1 F-1DeskLamp

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Posted 25 June 2018 - 10:20 PM

What I want to do is change out the OS on my SSD for my PC.  I want to dump everything on that SSD onto my laptop, and then install the OS on the SSD while it is bare and clean.  

 

Can I do that, and then get all of the apps and files back on the SSD the way they were before?  Or what should I expect? 

 

 

Tanks much appreciated



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#2 britechguy

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Posted 25 June 2018 - 10:28 PM

No.  At least not as it seems you're envisioning.

 

My standard advice to anyone who wants to do a completely clean install of any OS is to back up all of your user data (for all users), use the utility of your choice to inventory the installed software and apps on you have on the machine and collect whatever is necessary to reinstall same on external storage, and to take a full system image of the computer as it stands in case you should wish to go back to that if you're unhappy with the "clean slate" and the work involved in getting it back to the way you used to have it.

 

After the clean OS install you will then install your previously installed software and apps (also from scratch), set up whatever accounts are needed, and copy all of the user data back.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#3 F-1DeskLamp

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Posted 25 June 2018 - 10:36 PM

So just to clarify for the guys and gals in the back of the class. 

 

Normally the clean install is easier and faster if done simply from an image of the computer?  Is that right, and if yes, can you suggest some kind of image making program?  I believe it is called a clone, no?  
 

How much data is the image.  I imagine that it is severag gigs, right?  LOL

 

 

 

But since I don't have an image of the computer this round, I will have to compile a list of all of my apps, do the clean install after the SSD is transferred out, and then clean install each of my apps, correct?  By user data do you mean my preferences and files attached to the apps?  How do I assert such data onto my cleanly installed apps?  

 

 

Thanks much appreciated



#4 britechguy

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Posted 25 June 2018 - 11:19 PM

Reimaging a computer from a full system image, even if that image so happens to have been taken immediately after a completely clean install of the OS, is not the same thing as doing a completely clean install of the OS.

 

You can reimage (and often do) from images that have been taken nearest to the present day in the case of something like a catastrophic disc drive failure.  What you get back is the system as it was at the moment the full system image was taken.

 

You are correct that I am saying, that absent a full system image from which one could restore, one does the completely clean install of the OS (I have no idea what you mean by "after the SSD is transferred out"), then do a fresh install of your apps and installed programs.

 

By user data I mean just that - it covers whatever it needs to cover - but generally includes photos, music, any office suite documents of any type, installers for programs (if you include those in your user data backup and have put the collection together before taking it), videos, etc., etc., etc.   When it comes to preferences/settings when a given program supports cloud storage of same (e.g., Firefox and Chrome both keep track of your installed add-ons/extensions (respectively) plus a lot of other stuff if you set up a sync account and stay logged in to it when using the browser; some other apps and cloud-connected applications do some thing similar) I rely on that to bring back my personalized settings.  When a program doesn't do this then I take note, if that's necessary, of what settings I've tweaked and just count on having to do that tweaking again myself.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#5 britechguy

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Posted 25 June 2018 - 11:27 PM

With regard to backup and imaging programs, we have a forum dedicated to that very subject:  Backup, Imaging, and Disk Management Software

 

For myself, I like EaseUS To Do Backup Free (current version is 11.0) because it does the job and the user interface is very straightforward.  There are other great ones like Macrium Reflect, AOMEI Backupper, and others.  See the above forum for a multitude of conversations of the pros and cons of those and more.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#6 F-1DeskLamp

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Posted 26 June 2018 - 12:05 AM

Thanks a tril   :graduate:



#7 F-1DeskLamp

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Posted 26 June 2018 - 12:13 AM

When I do the clean install with the W10, is that going to recognize my license or whatever validates me as a user of the software?  Is it all deleted or whatnot?
 

The reason I have to ask is because I bought the PC used to save about $1,200, and I was just using whatever OS was on it, W10. 



#8 opera

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Posted 26 June 2018 - 12:28 AM

Your activation info for the licence is saved in the cloud by Microsoft for Win 10.

 

It will recognise the fact that you have a valid digital licence for that machine.



#9 F-1DeskLamp

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Posted 26 June 2018 - 12:33 AM

:thumbsup:



#10 britechguy

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Posted 26 June 2018 - 09:01 AM

Your activation info for the licence is saved in the cloud by Microsoft for Win 10.

 

It will recognise the fact that you have a valid digital licence for that machine.

 

The only thing I'll add here is that I'd change the "Your" to "The" in sentence one and the "you" to "there exists" in sentence two.

 

As you've indicated, the licensing scheme for Windows 10 is tied to the motherboard of the machine on which it was legally installed.  It matters not one whit whether the person doing a completely clean install of Windows 10 was the original owner or is the Nth owner of the machine, as the digital license is not tied to any individual's Microsoft account.

 

This is one of the major changes with the advent of Windows 10 that makes reinstalling the OS a cinch compared to earlier Windows releases.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#11 opera

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Posted 26 June 2018 - 10:32 AM

 

Your activation info for the licence is saved in the cloud by Microsoft for Win 10.

 

It will recognise the fact that you have a valid digital licence for that machine.

 

The only thing I'll add here is that I'd change the "Your" to "The" in sentence one and the "you" to "there exists" in sentence two.

 

As you've indicated, the licensing scheme for Windows 10 is tied to the motherboard of the machine on which it was legally installed.  It matters not one whit whether the person doing a completely clean install of Windows 10 was the original owner or is the Nth owner of the machine, as the digital license is not tied to any individual's Microsoft account.

 

This is one of the major changes with the advent of Windows 10 that makes reinstalling the OS a cinch compared to earlier Windows releases.

 

 

Well as we are getting into English language classes here, may I point out that the original poster asked...

 

''is that going to recognize my license''

 

so I naturally replied ..

 

''Your activation info for the licence...''

 

as I was referring to his licence.

 

So I won't be changing anything :)



#12 britechguy

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Posted 26 June 2018 - 11:20 AM

It wasn't intended as an English lesson, but an attempt to clarify that the idea of "your" license for Windows 10 is not really the best way to think of it.

 

The license is tied to the machine rather than its owner once any owner has put a legal copy of Windows 10 on it.  That's the only point I was trying to make.

 

This is quite different than the way Microsoft licenses most of its stuff.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 





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