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#1 trevorcork

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Posted 22 June 2018 - 01:07 PM

hi just quick question i started out in IT over 3 yrs ago as level 1 support, then i moved to a position which was field based with some level 1 & 2, and then last yr i joined this company where i look after level 1 & level 2 support, but this company are moving operations to dubai, it does not suit me to relocate so i have been looking for and got offered two different postions

 

1 in a pharma company level 1 support working direct under manager starting on 30,000

2 position in financial company level 2 support starting on 38,000 but no manager on site my support will be based in another country,

 

just wondering will it be harder not working directly under someone as could be issues i have not seen / come across etc, im in limbo


Edited by hamluis, 22 June 2018 - 01:44 PM.
Moved from Win 7 to IT Careers - Hamluis.


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#2 Kilroy

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Posted 25 June 2018 - 03:16 PM

It really depends on you.  How confident are you that you could handle working without someone to lean on.  It is really difficult to answer without knowing if you will be all by yourself or if there will be another person you can lean on until you know the ropes.  Unless you are very concerned about not having a manager on site I'd go with the Level 2 job with more money.

 

I've been doing Level 2 support my entire career, over 20 years.  Most of the time Level 2 is on an island.  You have level 1 people to open tickets and handle basic tasks and level 3 people that are experts in their technologies, everything else falls to you.

 

The first 30 days of any new job are the "stupid days", no matter how long you've been doing the work, you haven't been doing it here.  Then you have another 60 days where you are learning the environment and what the common issues are.  After that you should, for the most part be fully functional.


Edited by Kilroy, 25 June 2018 - 03:18 PM.


#3 trevorcork

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Posted 17 July 2018 - 01:31 PM

hi just an update i took the level2 job with more money, im there 2 weeks now all good, im the only IT support on site at present alot of hardware issues and printer maintanence i love it so far and everyone is nice and good freedom aswell im always around the building calling to someone, so yes i think i made the rite choice as ye told me too thanks,

they use Citrix which i havent used before, the only annoying thing is the amount of induction videos had to be done



#4 Kilroy

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Posted 17 July 2018 - 02:06 PM

Good to hear that it is going well.  The first week of any new job is filled with Special High Intensity Training.

 

When I was doing contract work I always looked for a job where I didn't know everything.  That way I could keep learning.  The more you know, the more you're worth, and the easier it is to find another job.  If you're not learning something new in IT then you're not helping yourself.  My normal course when I work as a contractor was to spend the first 90 days learning how they did things.  Then the next nine months learning how all of the pieces fit together.  Once you understand how things work you can find, and suggest, things that can be improved upon.



#5 trevorcork

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Posted 17 July 2018 - 02:25 PM

yes i agreee they are using alot of different systems/ applications i have not used before,

also using tools for deployment of images its cool loving it

all lexmark printers ill have to chage maintanence kits on them etc- i looked it up its looks fairly simple really

so ya always learning and lets hope it goes well



#6 Kilroy

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Posted 17 July 2018 - 02:49 PM

Even when you fail you learn how not to do it the next time.  Learn new stuff, make more money and love what you do, equals a good life.






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