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Hardware Temp Monitoring


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#1 Omega Knight

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Posted 17 June 2018 - 11:27 PM

Hello everyone,

 

It's been a while since I have asked a question on here. I have a small one, this go around. I'm honestly not sure if this belongs in hardware or software, since it's about software concerning the hardware...

 

Recently I had to replace both case fans on my beast. In the process, I have filled both top slots, and still don't know where the second front slot is supposed to be on a Sentinel case. Regardless, this all leads me to a question more out of curiosity than anything else.

 

Does windows 10 come with software in it already for me to see how hot my system is running? If not, is there software I can get that would allow me to see this information?



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#2 ranchhand_

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Posted 18 June 2018 - 07:24 AM

http://openhardwaremonitor.org/


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#3 Omega Knight

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Posted 19 June 2018 - 02:34 PM

Ok, got the program... Not thinking my GPU is healthy... While running Fallout 4 last night, it peaked at almost 170 degrees F. I don't have AC in the house, and I know neither of the fans on the GPU are working, for whatever reason... I have no clue how to fix it either. If I could figure out how to post images with this comment, I'd have posted a screenshot of the program that is now monitoring my system temps



#4 britechguy

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Posted 19 June 2018 - 02:47 PM

76 degrees C is not particularly "hot" for many processors. I suggest you consult the spec sheet for yours.

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#5 Omega Knight

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Posted 19 June 2018 - 05:11 PM

So... I'm guessing that as long as I can keep it from going above that point very often (if avoidable), it should be ok?



#6 britechguy

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Posted 19 June 2018 - 05:49 PM

As I said, check out the spec sheet for the chip in question.  That is what will tell you what the Tmax for it is.  This is the maximum "normal" (as in it's the upper end of the allowable temperature range, and should not be constantly at that temperature when idle or under less than high load) running temperature.  

 

This is generally significantly lower than Tcritical, where the device will throttle a few degrees below it and shut down without warning if it's reached.

 

As an example, take the AMD A12-9700P APU that's in my machine.  Here's the spec page from cpu-world.com:

 

                      http://www.cpu-world.com/CPUs/Bulldozer/AMD-A12-Series%20A12-9700P.html

 

The Tmax for this chip is 90° C.  That's an awful lot higher than 76° C, and that's not an atypical Tmax figure for many more recent processors.

 

If you're concerned specifically about your GPU the manufacturer should put out a specification sheet that notes its Tmax and, sometimes, Tcritical.

 

Just realize that it is possible for temperatures to exceed Tmax briefly if operating under heavy load and that Tcritical is not a mere 1° above Tmax.


Edited by britechguy, 19 June 2018 - 05:51 PM.

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#7 Omega Knight

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Posted 19 June 2018 - 06:56 PM

Wow.... I just went looking, and found the MSI Gaming App, and some interesting information about my GPU. It would seem, that my card doesn't think it's warm enough at almost 170 degrees F to run the fans. It has a Zero Frozr technology, which is, by default, on. I turned it off, and all of a sudden, my GPU fans starts spinning. Turned it back on, and it wound down to nothing.

 

This, of course, begs the question... The spec sheet said that Zero Frozr was supposed to turn off my gpu fans until the gpu reached 60 degrees F... My GPU has been running in excess of 112 degrees F consistently... why on earth weren't the fans being run...


Edited by Omega Knight, 19 June 2018 - 07:02 PM.


#8 britechguy

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Posted 19 June 2018 - 08:13 PM

Please give links to the spec sheet.

 

I have never, and I mean never, seen tech specs use Fahrenheit measurement, only Celsius.  Think about how silly it would be to use 60 degrees F, which is chilly for a human being, as a metric in computer cooling.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#9 Omega Knight

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Posted 19 June 2018 - 08:32 PM

https://www.msi.com/Graphics-card/GTX-970-GAMING-4G/Specification

I couldn't find anything on the temperature tolerances, but this was the only one that I could verify was related to my graphics card.



#10 britechguy

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Posted 19 June 2018 - 08:54 PM

Your machine has an Nvdia GeForce GTX 970 GPU, according to the system spec sheet.

 

According to the actual specs for the Nvdia GeForce GTX 970 GPU, Tmax is 98° C.   Thus, 76° C is not even vaguely anywhere near to "hot."   Running 22° C below Tmax is an absolutely huge buffer.  I would not expect the fans to be doing too terribly much work at that temperature, though I wouldn't think they'd be off, either.  Of course, it also depends on how much the builders presumed would be cooled passively by airflow through the cabinet from other fans.

 

Good heavens, just look at the manufacturer's webpage for the 


Edited by britechguy, 19 June 2018 - 08:58 PM.
Added last paragraph. This unit is running perfectly normally

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#11 Omega Knight

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Posted 19 June 2018 - 08:56 PM

Good points... Given the effects of having the fans off and letting it get up to 170 F... I think I'll leave the Frozr off, and let the fans run.



#12 britechguy

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Posted 19 June 2018 - 09:00 PM

You are worrying about nothing.  The manufacturer's webpage:

 

https://msi.com/Graphics-card/GTX-970-GAMING-4G

 

shows temperatures in the high 60s C as "an improvement."  Paranoia about overheating is not serving you well.

 

That same page, further down, shows a picture of "fans spinning during intense hardcore gaming or benchmarking" side by side with "fans stop during idle, multimedia, or light gaming."   This unit is functioning precisely as designed.  Don't screw with it!


Edited by britechguy, 19 June 2018 - 09:04 PM.
Fixed typo, had typed 70s, is 60s

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 





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