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HDD - BIOS slow detection on 2nd Master


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#1 EoflaOE

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Posted 17 June 2018 - 12:30 AM

After I set the secondary working HDD to Master (including the jumpers, cables) without resetting the BIOS, I notice these:

- First cold boot in the morning, or after every shutdown, leads to "Boot Failure" and to "Insert proper boot device and press any key to continue", because the BIOS has timed out after detecting the secondary master.
- The CD-ROM is still working
- There is the HDD light but no clicking sound before the monitor turns on to the BIOS to detect the secondary master, then the HDD light turns off after 15-20 seconds.
- When I tried to press the Reset button, it has been detected, although slow.
- The OS boots fine! Windows can run fast, no performance affection, no BSOD, no problems. Linux detected the hard drive after waiting for Linux to detect it. After putting the "rootdelay=99999" because Linux timed out before the HDD is actually probed, everything works fine!
- I still can copy, move, delete files, do HDD operations, boot, and everything.
- The reboot works fine, and it detected the hard drive, although slow.
- The GPU still works fast. I have tested games.

I think it isn't the sign of the HDD failure. I think it can be something wrong somewhere in BIOS settings, but I am sure there is nothing wrong with the OS.

I don't get BSOD's or kernel panics either. No failures while doing HDD operations.

Is there something I could be missing while setting the HDD to secondary master? Or is there anything I could do? I don't want to run verification tests for the hard drive.

System specs is in my signature. The HDD is IDE SCSI and isn't SATA.

Main PC: CPU: AMD Athlon XP 1500+, Motherboard: KT4AV MS-6712, GPU: ATI Radeon 9200 Series, RAM: 2 GB, HDD: WDC WD400BB-00DEA0 40GB, PSU: Mercury KOB AP4300XA 300W, OS: Windows XP Professional SP3

 

Planned (Dell OptiPlex 7050 - incomplete, may not be final): CPU: Intel Core i7-7700, GPU: Intel Integrated Graphics, RAM: 8 GB, HDD: 1 TB 7200 RPM, PSU: Internal, Speaker: Built-in inside case, OS: Windows 10 Pro 64-bit


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#2 mightywiz

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Posted 18 June 2018 - 03:17 PM

run crystal disc info, or a hardware monitor that includes smart diagnostics.   and it will tell you if the drive has some bad sectors.  this will cause issues, especially in the firware area of the platters.



#3 EoflaOE

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Posted 19 June 2018 - 03:46 AM

I got the information from CrystalDiskInfo on Hiren's menu on the working system because the latest version (7.6.1) on the website doesn't run but can install on Windows XP. It is located in the screenshot.

Also, I've had it parse quickly before the failing hard drive incident, and it has had put on the slave. After putting it to the master, this slowness on the detection started. I can access everything on the hard drive quickly though. I can run programs quickly, download things, install quickly, and so on.

I have noticed that it has run for 3 years, so 2 years left and it will die (expectancy). I saw that the hard drive is good! Nothing marked bad.

Attached Files


Main PC: CPU: AMD Athlon XP 1500+, Motherboard: KT4AV MS-6712, GPU: ATI Radeon 9200 Series, RAM: 2 GB, HDD: WDC WD400BB-00DEA0 40GB, PSU: Mercury KOB AP4300XA 300W, OS: Windows XP Professional SP3

 

Planned (Dell OptiPlex 7050 - incomplete, may not be final): CPU: Intel Core i7-7700, GPU: Intel Integrated Graphics, RAM: 8 GB, HDD: 1 TB 7200 RPM, PSU: Internal, Speaker: Built-in inside case, OS: Windows 10 Pro 64-bit


#4 mightywiz

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Posted 19 June 2018 - 11:28 AM

some older western digital caviar drives have motor issues, when cold the motor can't spin up to speed fast enough.

 

and a couple of your smart readings are questionable:

 04 - start/stop count  should be 0 your's is at 40

 0A - spin retry count  should be 0 your's is at 51

 0B - recalibration retrys   "            your's is at 51

 

this is probably the exact issues as im talking about above.

 

I wouldn't trust this drive, even though it says it good.



#5 EoflaOE

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Posted 19 June 2018 - 11:43 AM

Thanks, but is there any way to fix this issue? Or is it the known issues with the hard drive?

Main PC: CPU: AMD Athlon XP 1500+, Motherboard: KT4AV MS-6712, GPU: ATI Radeon 9200 Series, RAM: 2 GB, HDD: WDC WD400BB-00DEA0 40GB, PSU: Mercury KOB AP4300XA 300W, OS: Windows XP Professional SP3

 

Planned (Dell OptiPlex 7050 - incomplete, may not be final): CPU: Intel Core i7-7700, GPU: Intel Integrated Graphics, RAM: 8 GB, HDD: 1 TB 7200 RPM, PSU: Internal, Speaker: Built-in inside case, OS: Windows 10 Pro 64-bit


#6 mightywiz

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Posted 19 June 2018 - 05:30 PM

just common issue with drives, especially older drives.  only fix is to send off to a recovery lab with a clean room and they can find the exact same drive with a good motor and swap it out.  big bucks!!!!!

 

i would purchase a new drive and clone it to the new drive.   a lot cheaper.  just do it before the drive seizes up entirely.    if it does you can do the hair "dryer fix"  basically you warm the case up with a

hair dryer to heat the case to free up the motor.   valid technique the pro's use to recover a drive.



#7 EoflaOE

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Posted 19 June 2018 - 11:55 PM

Thanks for help!

This computer is old anyway, but I will try to get an external hard drive after getting a new case and move all important data (including the backup to the "Other Data (C:)" before the hard drive failure incident) to the external hard drive before the hard drive that is on my computer reaches 5 years.

But for some reason I will use old PC less frequently for installing Linux trying out things, compiling some apps, and opening the VNC server after all those operation.

Also, I will try the hair dryer fix after the hard drive seizes and see if it helps.

If the hard drive is no longer working because it reached 5 years, I will store the old PC somewhere until I get a new IDE hard drive for old PCs.

Main PC: CPU: AMD Athlon XP 1500+, Motherboard: KT4AV MS-6712, GPU: ATI Radeon 9200 Series, RAM: 2 GB, HDD: WDC WD400BB-00DEA0 40GB, PSU: Mercury KOB AP4300XA 300W, OS: Windows XP Professional SP3

 

Planned (Dell OptiPlex 7050 - incomplete, may not be final): CPU: Intel Core i7-7700, GPU: Intel Integrated Graphics, RAM: 8 GB, HDD: 1 TB 7200 RPM, PSU: Internal, Speaker: Built-in inside case, OS: Windows 10 Pro 64-bit





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