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2018-06 Cumulative Update KB4284835


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#1 alanem

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Posted 16 June 2018 - 09:16 AM

Hi Windows is continually trying to install 2018-06 Cumulative Update KB4284835 and fails with this error message:

 

Last failed install attempt on ‎16/‎06/‎2018 - 0x800f0922

 

Every time I boot up it tries, fails then undoes all the changes taking ages with restarts.

 

How do I stop it trying?   Thanks



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#2 Mason21

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Posted 16 June 2018 - 11:36 AM

This error can be a couple of things... First, is "low system reserved partition space" and the second is "failure for connection to microsoft servers" .  Type in "disk management" in the Windows search box and check how much space you have left on your drive. If you are on wifi...try plugging directly in to the router. https://www.easeus.com/backup-utility/windows-10-update-with-error-code-0x800f0922-issue.html


Edited by Mason21, 16 June 2018 - 11:39 AM.


#3 FrankOtheMountaiN

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Posted 20 August 2018 - 06:19 PM

I have the same problem on multiple computers

 

We were unable to complete the updates

undoing changes/reboot twice

 

really annoying



Frank O' The Mountain
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#4 britechguy

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Posted 20 August 2018 - 06:36 PM

If folks have Windows Update still trying to install 2018-06 Cumulative Update KB4284835, then something's wrong with Windows Update on their machine(s).

 

There have been multiple cumulative updates since then, and when the next cumulative update comes out the previous one should be skipped over if it hasn't applied in favor of the latest one.  There should be no further attempts to install any cumulative update that predates the most recent one.

 

There are multiple topics on this very forum regarding how to clear out your Windows Update folders, which typically fixes this class of issue.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#5 jenae

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Posted 20 August 2018 - 10:30 PM

Hi, yes as britechguy say's your updates are in a mess, it is possible to repair this, however it does require you to load and then unload a registry hive, and run some Dism cmd's, syntax critical, not in my opinion too difficult, however many people are frightened to try this, as it's something way over their heads. I don't mean this in a disrespectful way, just from experience many have balked at attempting it. Since it takes some time to write out I have decided not to bother on this a mum's and dad's forum.

 
Leaves you with two alternatives first (and always best) is to do a complete clean install of windows.
 
Second (and in your case recommended, as a clean install can always be used as a fall back).
 
Download the windows media creation tool from MS (you need a blank flash drive with at least 8gb capacity.)
 
 
Read the instructions, you do not need to create a ISO unless you have problems with the straight download (most don't). 
 
Boot to windows and open the downloaded flash drive, it contains a file setup.exe, all you do is run this, A reinstall of the OS will take place, it will be the most current version. All your apps and files will be maintained, this is the default option, just make sure you don't select any other. It will essentially be the same as the old install, you lose nothing. This is the best approach for you now, since it will fix your updates problem. 


#6 FrankOtheMountaiN

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Posted 20 August 2018 - 11:52 PM

Well, I've been battling windows every day since 1998, and I've won over many problems. These 3 machines were running fine until that botched update came along. I tried lots of things for hours, and nothing worked, so I just keep pausing updates. Guess I'll try the clean install saving programs and settings.



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#7 jenae

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Posted 21 August 2018 - 01:18 AM

Hi, it is not a clean install, a clean install is just that, everything is new again, no programs settings or apps (other then default) are loaded, you basically are back to when you first bought your computer. This is the best way, as it gives a fresh default install, of course if you have backups, you can restore to however you like.

 

A reinstall from within windows is the only way to keep all apps, programs and default settings, this was the second method (not a clean install).

 

All the crap from the previous install will come over, any mod's to the system or registry will be removed and systems returned to defaults. It does however give you the current version and will eliminate your updates problem as the component store is rebuilt, this is the preferred method and as I said, you can always perform a "clean install" if this fails (which it shouldn't).



#8 britechguy

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Posted 21 August 2018 - 09:37 AM

I have to say that I have used both Doing a Completely Clean Install of Windows 10 and Doing an In-place "Upgrade" to Reinstall Windows 10 Keeping Apps/Programs and User Files and have had excellent results with both.

 

If you really want to avoid having to reinstall a bunch of programs and restore data files it is my opinion that it is always worth trying the in-place "upgrade" first.  I have yet to have it fail to clean things up, and quite thoroughly.

 

I just did one overnight on my partner's machine, and it's worked beautifully.  One word of warning, though, is that you definitely need to revisit your Privacy Settings, your Power Options/"Choose what the power button does" in Control Panel to turn off Fast Startup, and check that System Protection is on if you want for it to be on.  In the case of my partner's computer, Fast Startup was turned on again and I wanted it off, but the settings for System Protection (On) were carried over.  We had also neutered Cortana way back in the day when you could do that using Windows settings and all of that carried over, too.

 

I used the "using the ISO" file method since I routinely download an ISO as each feature update version of Windows 10 comes along.  I have also used the same method with a bootable thumb drive, which you don't have to boot from, just kicking off the setup.exe from it.

 

I figure since a non-thermonuclear option is available, and it makes life very easy when it works (and it always has in my experience), I try to avoid the thermonuclear option (completely clean install) when I can avoid it.  It saves a lot of time (and, for clients, money).

 

jenae, if you read this, I want your opinion as to whether the step for the in-place upgrade reinstall that says you must turn secure boot OFF is actually necessary.  I cannot see why it would be, since feature updates work just fine with it enabled and this is really the rough equivalent of a feature update by another means.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#9 alanem

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Posted 21 August 2018 - 02:04 PM

Thanks Jennae..updates don't seem to be a problem now after I took your advice and did a reinstall from within Windows.  Can't really comment on BC being a Mums and Dads forum as I'm a Granddad but it worked me.  Thanks again for all the help.



#10 jenae

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Posted 21 August 2018 - 04:22 PM

Hi, it's working from within the OS, nothing to do with the boot, and if the system was booting fine before this with no changes needed to the BIOS then this practice will continue, so NO I have never modified the BIOS before doing a in place reinstall.



#11 britechguy

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Posted 21 August 2018 - 05:06 PM

jenae, the directive to turn off Secure Boot made no logical sense to me, but I wanted to verify that with someone more well-versed in Windows System Internals and the nuts and bolts of how that might interact with UEFI/BIOS.

 

I am glad to hear that my use of logic led to the correct conclusion.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#12 FrankOtheMountaiN

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Posted 21 August 2018 - 07:26 PM

I was tired on my previous reply. I meant "in place upgrade". I am going to try it now.

I have recent images, so I'm not frightened. Thanks for the suggestion. Here goes....

 

 

Oh, and that is a good thing to learn which I never paid much mind to:

Start out with a current win 10 boot media from MS so you don't have to go through all of those updates again.

I always used an old one.


Edited by FrankOtheMountaiN, 21 August 2018 - 07:34 PM.


Frank O' The Mountain
Doing more stupid before 5AM than most people do all day.


#13 FrankOtheMountaiN

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Posted 21 August 2018 - 10:00 PM

Thank you guys

 

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Doing more stupid before 5AM than most people do all day.





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