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still problems with KB4056894


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#1 tharunam

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Posted 13 June 2018 - 12:21 PM

Hello all;
 
I need your help.
 
In January of this year, Microsoft sent out an Rollup update called KB4056894 and it corrupted machines running windows 7 64 bit.
 
I was able to partially be able to get my pc up and functional but some effects of the damage remains. 
 
When I run "sfc/scannow" and then at the next reboot, I always get stop error, "0x000000c4". I did reseach and it told me do execute the following command:
 

dism /image:d:\ /remove-package /packagename:Package_for_RollupFix~31bf3856ad364e35~amd64~~7601.24002.1.4 /norestart /scratchdir:d:\temp

When I execute this command with windows repair screen and command prompt screen, I get the following error.
 
This image is NOT serviceable any longer and you should unmount this image and discard your changes.
 
I have been struggling to find out how to do that in windows 7.
 
If someone could guide me, it would be greatly appreciated.

Edited by hamluis, 13 June 2018 - 12:34 PM.
Merged posts - Hamluis.


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#2 tharunam

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Posted 13 June 2018 - 12:29 PM

If someone could help me with executing an unmount command in windows 7 for a specific windows update that went very wrong : KB4056894.

 

Executed :

 

dism /image:d:\ /remove-package /packagename:Package_for_RollupFix~31bf3856ad364e35~amd64~~7601.24002.1.4 /norestart /scratchdir:d:\temp

 

 

It came back with an error that the image in NO longer serviceable and I must unmount and get rid of the changes.

 

For the above how would you execute the command to unmount the image in windows 7 64 bit.

 

Thanks in advance for you time and help.



#3 lmacri

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Posted 21 June 2018 - 11:28 AM

Hi tharunam:

Sorry, I don't have a Win 7 computer but I noticed your post <here> in the Vista board so I'll add a few suggestions in this thread. What is the make/model of your computer, do you have a 32-bit or 64-bit Win 7 OS and what type of CPU processor do you have?  If you have a discrete graphics card (e.g., AMD Radeon, NVIDIA GeForce, etc.) what is the make/model and current graphics driver version.  Post back if you need assistance finding this information.

Have you been seeing these "0x000000C4" stop errors and BSODs every time you boot your computer since Windows Update applied KB4056894 back in January 2018?  The KB4056894 (2018-01 Security Monthly Quality Rollup for Windows 7; January 9, 2018) bug that caused machines with older AMD processors to become unbootable was released back in January 2018 and has been superseded/replaced by KB4074598 (2018-02 Security Monthly Quality Rollup for Windows 7; February 13, 2018).  Your post # 50 in the thread I'm stuck in an update/system repair loop! indicates that your system was booting correctly on 28-Mar-2018, so if the only issue you see now is a "0x000000C4" stop error after running the System File Checker (sfc /scannow) then I'm not sure that uninstalling KB4074598 at this late date is going to fix your problem.

 

Can you confirm that KB4056894 is still listed in your installed updates? Go to Control Panel | Programs and Features | View Installed Updates and enter the full KB number in the search box (e.g., "KB4056894" and not a partial string like "4056894"). You stated "I was able to partially be able to get my pc up and functional but some effects of the damage remains" and that suggests to me that you already uninstalled KB4056894 back in January 2018.  If your system boots up normally then you should be able to uninstall buggy Windows Update patches from View Installed Updates.

 

The DISM command you're trying to run uninstalls KB4056894 and is intended for users who cannot boot into normal mode and are launching the command prompt from inside the emergency Windows Recovery Environment (i.e., from Repair Your Computer from the Advanced Boot options). When you are in the Windows Recovery Environment you are using a special Windows image and your Windows drive letter usually isn't your regular "C:\" drive. Note that the DISM command you've been using assumes your recovery image is on D:\ drive, not C:\drive. If you are running this command from outside the Windows Recovery Environment or your recovery image does not default to D:\ drive then that could be why you are seeing an error about an unmounted image. The step-by-step instructions in the ghacks.net article Fix Windows 7 BSOD 0x000000c4 after installing KB4056894 note that you should type in the command dir d: first to check that the Windows drive is mapped before running the DISM command.

 

The "0x000000C4" stop error is usually associated with a DRIVER_VERIFIER_DETECTED_VIOLATION issue on computers that have the Driver Verifier tool enabled.  System File Checker (sfc /scannow) only checks the integrity of your Windows system files and it's possible that the buggy driver causing the BSODs is a hardware driver (e.g., a driver for a graphics card) that can't be fixed with System File Checker. The Desktop Window Manager (dwm.exe) that was flagged by your System File Checker enables the use of hardware acceleration to render the graphical user interface of Windows and might be pointing to a minor issue with graphics rendering.

There are free utilities like Nirsoft's BlueScreenView or Resplendence's Who Crashed that can interpret and summarize the Bug Check (BC) codes in your recent Windows mini-dump files.  These free utilities aren't as accurate as an analysis of your full dump files with WinDbg (Windows Debugger) tool the experts in BleepingComputer's Windows Crashes, BSOD, and Hangs Help and Support board use because these free utilities only show the drivers loaded in the crash stack at the time of your BSOD, but I was able to fix intermittent BSODs on my Vista SP2 computer a few years ago after BlueScreenView pointed to a problem with an out-of-date driver for my NVIDIA graphics card. See the instructions in caweclark's thread BSOD if you'd like to post a BlueScreenView diagnostic logs in your next reply and I'll see if I can at least point you in the right direction.
------------
32-bit Vista Home Premium SP2 * Firefox ESR v52.8.1 * Norton Security v22.14.2.13 * Malwarebytes 3.5.1
HP Pavilion dv6835ca, Intel Core2Duo T5550 @ 1.83 GHz, 3 GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce 8400M GS


Edited by lmacri, 21 June 2018 - 12:13 PM.


#4 tharunam

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Posted 21 June 2018 - 02:30 PM

I am so grateful for your detailed response. I have narrowed down to list of dll that may be causing me a problema and I will list them below.

 

Thanks again from the bottom of my heart for taking the time to answer.

 

  How does one upload the jpeg or pdf file for review here


Edited by hamluis, 21 June 2018 - 06:22 PM.


#5 lmacri

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Posted 21 June 2018 - 03:45 PM

... How does one upload the jpeg or pdf file for review here....

 

Hi tharunam:

 

To add an image file (e.g., .jpg, .png, etc.) stored on your hard drive click the More Reply Options button (next to the Post button) to take you to the advanced editor and then use the section below the editor labelled Attach Files to add the file.  Click the Browse button to select the file, click the Attach This File button to upload the file to the BleepingComputer server, and then click your mouse where you want the image inserted in your post and click the Add to Post link next to the file name.

 

Attached File  bleepingcomputer Add Image to Posts.png   15.28KB   0 downloads

 

If you'd like me to review your BlueScreenView logs it would help if you followed the instructions in caweclark's thread BSOD and saved the scan results in a .txt file which you can attach to your next post.  That way I can see results for multiple mini-dump files at the same time.  Here's a sample .txt file I exported from BlueScreenView a few years ago showing details for two BSODs caused by an out-of-date driver for my NVIDIA graphics drivers (Caused By Driver: nvlddmkm.sys; File Description: NVIDIA Windows Kernel Mode Driver, Version 307.83; File Version: 9.18.13.0783).

 

Attached File  Nirsoft BSV BSOD Sample 25 Jan 2014.txt   4.18KB   2 downloads

------------
32-bit Vista Home Premium SP2 * Firefox ESR v52.8.1 * Norton Security v22.14.2.13 * BlueScreenView v1.55
HP Pavilion dv6835ca, Intel Core2Duo T5550 @ 1.83 GHz, 3 GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce 8400M GS


Edited by lmacri, 21 June 2018 - 04:05 PM.


#6 tharunam

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Posted 21 June 2018 - 03:49 PM

Attached File  IMG_20180620_062756.jpg   188.33KB   0 downloads

Attached File  IMG_20180620_062839.jpg   173.79KB   0 downloads

Attached File  IMG_20180620_062756.jpg   188.33KB   0 downloads

Attached File  IMG_20180620_062902.jpg   166.13KB   0 downloads

Attached File  IMG_20180620_062947.jpg   150.78KB   0 downloads

Attached File  IMG_20180620_062930.jpg   187.1KB   0 downloads

Attached Files


Edited by hamluis, 21 June 2018 - 06:30 PM.
Removed unnecessary quotebox - Hamluis.


#7 tharunam

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Posted 21 June 2018 - 03:53 PM

One or more of the attached image file is causing a constant blue screen crash with 0x000000c4 in windows 7 sp1Attached File  IMG_20180620_062756.jpg   188.33KB   1 downloadsAttached File  IMG_20180620_062803.jpg   151.21KB   0 downloadsAttached File  IMG_20180620_062839.jpg   173.79KB   0 downloadsAttached File  IMG_20180620_062902.jpg   166.13KB   0 downloadsAttached File  IMG_20180620_062930.jpg   187.1KB   0 downloadsAttached File  IMG_20180620_062947.jpg   150.78KB   0 downloads



#8 lmacri

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Posted 21 June 2018 - 06:45 PM

Hi tharunam:

 

I'm sorry, but you haven't even explained what repair utility or command is generating that list of files [you posted <here> in the Vista board on 19-Jun-2018 that your CBS.log file showed that dwm.exe (the Desktop Window Manager) is the only system file that scf /scannow is unable to repair].  I'm not sure what I'm looking at in those images or whether you ran that repair after booting up in normal mode, Safe Mode or from the Windows Recovery Environment.

There's not much more I can do to help unless you provide the information I requested in post # 3.  At this point I don't even know your basic system specs, you haven't told me if KB4056894 is currently installed on your computer, and I don't know whether your computer BSODs every time you boot into "regular" (normal) mode or only on the first re-boot after running the System File Checker.  You haven't even posted a BlueScreenView and/or WhoCrashed diagnostic log of your mini-dump files to see if one of these free utilities can pinpoint the exact driver causing your BSODs.

Your best option now might be to post in the BleepingComputer Windows Crashes, BSOD, and Hangs Help and Support board where you can get free assistance analyzing the full dump files generated by your BSODs.  Read their guidelines Blue Screen of Death (BSOD) Posting Instructions - Windows 10, 8.1, 8, 7 & Vista for collecting .dmp files and system information if you decide to post there.
------------
32-bit Vista Home Premium SP2 * Firefox ESR v52.8.1 * Norton Security v22.14.2.13 * BlueScreenView v1.55
HP Pavilion dv6835ca, Intel Core2Duo T5550 @ 1.83 GHz, 3 GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce 8400M GS



#9 tharunam

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Posted 21 June 2018 - 07:02 PM

Hi tharunam:

 

I'm sorry, but you haven't even explained what repair utility or command is generating that list of files [you posted <here> in the Vista board on 19-Jun-2018 that your CBS.log file showed that dwm.exe (the Desktop Window Manager) is the only system file that scf /scannow is unable to repair].  I'm not sure what I'm looking at in those images or whether you ran that repair after booting up in normal mode, Safe Mode or from the Windows Recovery Environment.

There's not much more I can do to help unless you provide the information I requested in post # 3.  At this point I don't even know your basic system specs, you haven't told me if KB4056894 is currently installed on your computer, and I don't know whether your computer BSODs every time you boot into "regular" (normal) mode or only on the first re-boot after running the System File Checker.  You haven't even posted a BlueScreenView and/or WhoCrashed diagnostic log of your mini-dump files to see if one of these free utilities can pinpoint the exact driver causing your BSODs.

Your best option now might be to post in the BleepingComputer Windows Crashes, BSOD, and Hangs Help and Support board where you can get free assistance analyzing the full dump files generated by your BSODs.  Read their guidelines Blue Screen of Death (BSOD) Posting Instructions - Windows 10, 8.1, 8, 7 & Vista for collecting .dmp files and system information if you decide to post there.
------------
32-bit Vista Home Premium SP2 * Firefox ESR v52.8.1 * Norton Security v22.14.2.13 * BlueScreenView v1.55
HP Pavilion dv6835ca, Intel Core2Duo T5550 @ 1.83 GHz, 3 GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce 8400M GS

Sorry, every Time I run "sfc /scannow", with MSDART utility, I always get blue screen of death when the system tries to reboot with 0x000000c4. One of the above images does that. First I tried the first 3, same results, then I tried last three images, get the same effect. Thanks.. 



#10 lmacri

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Posted 21 June 2018 - 08:49 PM

Sorry, every Time I run "sfc /scannow", with MSDART utility, I always get blue screen of death when the system tries to reboot with 0x000000c4....

 

Hi tharunam:

 

Do I understand correctly that your computer usually boots up normally and only BSODs after you run the System File Checker using the Microsoft Diagnostics and Recovery Toolset (MSDaRT)?

Do you see a BSOD with the same "0x000000C4" stop error if you run System File Checker from an elevated command prompt instead of using MSDaRT?  Boot up normally and log in with a Windows user account that has Administrator rights, search for "command prompt" from the Start button (or go to Start | All Programs | Accessories), right click Command Prompt and choose Run as Administrator to open an elevated command prompt.

 

Attached File  Vista SP2 Elevated Command Prompt.png   10.03KB   0 downloads

On my Vista machine the title bar of an elevated command prompt will be labelled as "Administrator." (see image below).  Then type in the command sfc /scannow and wait for the scan to run to completion.

 

Attached File  SFC Scannow Administrator 21 May 2017.png   11.6KB   1 downloads

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32-bit Vista Home Premium SP2 * Firefox ESR v52.8.1 * Norton Security v22.14.2.13 * BlueScreenView v1.55
HP Pavilion dv6835ca, Intel Core2Duo T5550 @ 1.83 GHz, 3 GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce 8400M GS


Edited by lmacri, 21 June 2018 - 09:04 PM.


#11 tharunam

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Posted 22 June 2018 - 10:18 AM

 

Sorry, every Time I run "sfc /scannow", with MSDART utility, I always get blue screen of death when the system tries to reboot with 0x000000c4....

 

Hi tharunam:

 

Do I understand correctly that your computer usually boots up normally and only BSODs after you run the System File Checker using the Microsoft Diagnostics and Recovery Toolset (MSDaRT)?

Do you see a BSOD with the same "0x000000C4" stop error if you run System File Checker from an elevated command prompt instead of using MSDaRT?  Boot up normally and log in with a Windows user account that has Administrator rights, search for "command prompt" from the Start button (or go to Start | All Programs | Accessories), right click Command Prompt and choose Run as Administrator to open an elevated command prompt.

 

attachicon.gifVista SP2 Elevated Command Prompt.png

On my Vista machine the title bar of an elevated command prompt will be labelled as "Administrator." (see image below).  Then type in the command sfc /scannow and wait for the scan to run to completion.

 

attachicon.gifSFC Scannow Administrator 21 May 2017.png

------------
32-bit Vista Home Premium SP2 * Firefox ESR v52.8.1 * Norton Security v22.14.2.13 * BlueScreenView v1.55
HP Pavilion dv6835ca, Intel Core2Duo T5550 @ 1.83 GHz, 3 GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce 8400M GS

 

I get the same 0x000000c4 when I run sfc /scannow even with running via cmd and running as administrator.  The worst part is my minidump does NOT create a file even with all the correct parameters for creating minidump. This way, I cannot run the diagnostic on which dll or file is the problem child.



#12 lmacri

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Posted 22 June 2018 - 02:53 PM

I get the same 0x000000c4 when I run sfc /scannow even with running via cmd and running as administrator.  The worst part is my minidump does NOT create a file even with all the correct parameters for creating minidump. This way, I cannot run the diagnostic on which dll or file is the problem child.

 

Hi tharunam:

 

You still haven't answered most of my questions from post # 3.  I'm still not clear why you're running DISM commands from the Windows Recovery Environment to uninstall the KB4056894 if your computer is booting up correctly in normal mode.  Only a small number of  Win 7 SP1 machines were unbootable after KB4056894 was delivered by Windows Update in January 2018 (most were machines with older AMD processors) and I noted in post # 3 that the buggy KB4056894 was superseded / replaced by KB4074598 in February 2018.  Your assumption that your current stop error "0x000000c4" and BSODs are associated with KB4056894 might not even be correct.

Did System File Checker (SFC) run to completion when you booted up in normal mode and ran the sfc /scannow command from the elevated command prompt?  If so, did it report something like "Windows Resource Protection found corrupt files but was unable to fix some of them. Details are included in the CBS.Log %WinDir%\Logs\CBS\CBS.log."?  Entries related to SFC are tagged in CBS.log with the string "[SR]", and if you open an elevated command prompt and enter findstr /c:"[SR]" %windir%\logs\cbs\cbs.log >%userprofile%\Desktop\sfcdetails.txt this command should create a text file called sfcdetails.txt on your desktop with the detailed results of any recent SFC scans.  Please attach this sfcdetails.txt file in your next reply.  See the MS support article Use the System File Checker Tool to Repair Missing or Corrupted System Files for more information.

 

Go to Control Panel | System and Maintenance | System |  Advanced System Settings | Startup and Recovery | Settings | System Failure and see if your settings are similar to the default settings on my Vista SP2 machine (note that Write Debugging Information is set to write to Kernel Memory Dump).

 

Attached File  Vista SP2 System Recovery Kernel Memory Dump.png   7.34KB   0 downloads

If you aren't seeing .DMP files created at C:\Windows (full dumps) or C:\Windows\Minidump (mini-dumps) after a BSOD you might find something logged in your Windows Event Viewer.  As a quick check, go to Control Panel | System and Maintenance | Problem Reports and Solutions | View Problem History and see if there are any entries under Windows.  From my last BSOD in June 2017 (Problem Event Name: BlueScreen):

 

Attached File  Vista SP2 BSOD Logged Problem Reports and Solutions 17 Jun 2017.png   17.01KB   0 downloads

Also note that some third-party applications on my 32-bit Vista SP2 machine save their own dump files in the hidden folder C:\Users\<username>\AppData\Local\CrashDumps.  

If your BSODs aren't generating .DMP files then run a quick diagnostic of your system using Piriform's free Speccy utility. After Speccy has collected information about your system go to File | Publish Snapshot and then copy and paste the URL this generates (e.g., http: // speccy.piriform.com/results/xxx... ) so we can see a snapshot of your system.  See the Piriform support article Publishing a Speccy Profile to the Web for more information.
------------
32-bit Vista Home Premium SP2 * Firefox ESR v52.8.1 * Norton Security v22.14.2.13 * Malwarebytes 3.5.1
HP Pavilion dv6835ca, Intel Core2Duo T5550 @ 1.83 GHz, 3 GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce 8400M GS


Edited by lmacri, 22 June 2018 - 02:55 PM.


#13 lmacri

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Posted 22 June 2018 - 03:17 PM

...The worst part is my minidump does NOT create a file even with all the correct parameters for creating minidump. This way, I cannot run the diagnostic on which dll or file is the problem child.

 

Hi tharunam:

 

You might also find some helpful information in jcgriff2's post BSODs but no Dump Files? pinned at the top of BleepingComputer's Windows Crashes, BSOD, and Hangs Help and Support board.  Without any .DMP files it's going to be difficult, if not impossible, to diagnose the cause of your BSODs.

------------
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HP Pavilion dv6835ca, Intel Core2Duo T5550 @ 1.83 GHz, 3 GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce 8400M GS



#14 tharunam

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Posted 23 June 2018 - 07:45 AM

I have narrowed my 0x000000c4 to the following files. The unfortunate part is that no matter what I do I just cannot get the minidump file to write. Someone may have some other suggestion.

 

Thanks.

 

 

Attached Files



#15 lmacri

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Posted 23 June 2018 - 09:44 AM

Hi tharunam:

One last thought and then I'll step out of this thread and let someone else try to help you repair your system files. Looking at the screenshots you've posted, I'm a bit surprised that you could even boot your computer up in normal mode if critical files like kernel32.dll and ntdll.dll are actually corrupted and aren't being repaired by System File Checker (SFC).  Perhaps those system files are simply out-of-date because you rolled them back to an earlier version with a DISM command and will eventually be updated to the latest version when Windows Update installs your next Monthly Rollup.

 

Are are absolutely certain you're allowing your System File Checker (SFC) scans to run to completion?  It can take the sfc /scannow command a significant amount of time to run to completion and if you close the elevated command prompt or interrupt the scan in any way before verification is 100% complete and scan results are displayed this might cause the Driver Verifier to throw a "0x000000C4" stop error and BSOD.

We would have a better idea what's going if you would extract the results of your recent SFC scans from CBS.log as instructed in post # 12 and post those scan results in your thread, but in the mean time if you want to run another SFC scan try running the scan from Safe Mode.  To boot into Safe Mode, restart your computer and repeatedly tap the F8 key while your hardware is being tested (i.e., before the Windows logo is displayed) and choose Safe Mode from the advanced boot options menu.  Then run sfc /scannow from an elevated command prompt as instructed in post # 10. If SFC is having difficulty running to completion or the scan results report that "Windows Resource Protection could not perform the requested operation" then running SFC from Safe Mode should help.

The C:\Windows\winsxs\Temp\PendingRenames and C:\Windows\winsxs\Temp\PendingDeletes folders are used by both SFC and Windows Update to temporarily store existing files that are in use by the system, and a final cleanup routine normally finishes all pending actions and clears these folders during a system restart. (Note: Do not manually delete any files you find in C:\Windows\winsxs\Temp\ since this could damage your operating system).  If the TrustedInstaller is not completing the SFC cleanup routine correctly your CBS.log might include "Store coherency cookie matches last scavenge cookie, skipping scavenge" or some similar message.

 

Attached File  SFC Safe Mode PendingRenames Folder.png   23.74KB   0 downloads

I would also advise that you stop running any further DISM commands to force an uninstall of KB4056894 (or any other update applied by Windows Update) while you're troubleshooting.  It shouldn't be necessary to uninstall buggy updates from the Windows Recovery Environment if you can boot your system normally, and if you've gotten into some repeated cycle of repairing / deleting / replacing / updating then your system might be getting confused about pending actions needed to fix your system files.

 

If KB4056894 does not appear in your list of installed updates when you search for KB4056894 at Control Panel | Programs and Features | View Installed Updates, see Scott Weaver's 08-Jan-2018 suggestion <here> in the Comments section of the ghacks.net article Fix Windows 7 BSOD 0x000000c4 after installing KB4056894.  Make sure you are logged in to your computer with an account that has Administrator privileges, start your computer in the Windows Recovery Environment (i.e., Repair Your Computer) from the Advanced Boot options and choose Command Prompt.  Then run the DISM command suggested by Scott (DISM /image:C:\ /cleanup-image /revertpendingactions) in the command prompt and see if that gets you back on track.

------------
32-bit Vista Home Premium SP2 * Firefox ESR v52.8.1 * Norton Security v22.14.2.13 * BlueScreenView v1.55 * Speccy v1.32
HP Pavilion dv6835ca, Intel Core2Duo T5550 @ 1.83 GHz, 3 GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce 8400M GS


Edited by lmacri, 24 June 2018 - 07:53 AM.





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