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"Invalid Signature Detected. Check Secure Boot Policy" error


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#1 cakepro

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Posted 05 June 2018 - 09:40 AM

I am so grateful to have found this forum and this topic.  

I have an Asus N56JN and got the "Invalid Signature Detected.  Check Secure Boot Policy" error.

 

Following the wonderful instructions in this thread, I did as instructed in the Youtube video posted above, created a Windows Media Creation Tool to create a bootable USB flash drive of the Windows 10 install disk.

 

I absolutely CANNOT lose any data on my laptop, so I did not choose to do a clean install.  

 

I was able to use the flash drive to restore my computer to the last restore point, which was on June 2, prior to a critical update.

 

Now I am stuck.  With the USB drive in, it keeps taking me back to the choice to repair the laptop or do a clean install.  With the USB drive out, I have a black screen that says, "Reboot and Select proper Boot device or Insert Boot Media in selected Boot device and press a key."

 

Please help!  Thank you so much.


Edited by britechguy, 05 June 2018 - 10:55 AM.
Split to dedicated topic and changed title accordingly


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#2 JohnC_21

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Posted 05 June 2018 - 10:48 AM

Did you select Repair Laptop vs Clean Install? If this data is mission critical I would do one of the following before attempting anything including a Repair.

 

Remove the hard drive and attach it to another computer using a USB adapter or

 

Download a live linux distro called Mint Cinnamon. Burn the iso to a DVD by right clicking on any Windows 7 or later computer and selecting Burn Disk Image. If you have another spare USB flash drive you can use Rufus to create the bootable USB.

 

Boot Mint. Do not input any keyboard commands until you are at the Mint Desktop. Once at the Desktop you will see a Computer Icon. Click on it and in the lower left pane you will see your hard drive listed in GBs. Click on it and if Mint can mount your hard drive a File Manager will open showing the contents of your Windows partition. Attach a USB external drive. A USB icon will appear on the desktop and another file manager will open. You can copy and paste your data from the HDD to the External drive.

 

https://blog.linuxmint.com/?p=3457

 

The HDD will most likely show as read only because of the hibernation file of Windows 10.

 

Edit: I am going to request that your post be split from this thread to avoid confusion.


Edited by JohnC_21, 05 June 2018 - 10:49 AM.


#3 cakepro

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Posted 05 June 2018 - 11:35 AM

Hmm, well I did the repair and a system restore, do you think there's some way I can just get it to boot normally?   That Linux stuff sounds a bit out of my league.  Thank you :) 



#4 JohnC_21

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Posted 05 June 2018 - 11:45 AM

Can you access the Advanced Boot Options using the following method?

 

  • Hold the Power Button for 5 seconds or until the computer completely shuts off.
  • Press the Power Button to turn the computer on.
  • As soon as you see the rotating loading circle, press and hold the Power Button until the computer shuts off.
  • Repeat this process 2 or 3 times until you see the Preparing Automatic Repair screen.
  • Let the computer boot to the Automatic Repair screen.
  • Click Advanced Options, and then select Troubleshoot.

From Troubleshoot you could do a Reset with the option to keep your files. All your programs would need to be reinstalled. Also, if you stored your data in the programs folder that will also be deleted. Mint is not that difficult once you are at the Desktop. If the computer was pre-installed with Windows 8 or 10 you would need to disable SecureBoot in your BIOS settings before Mint could boot. 

 

Troubleshoot would also let you do a Automatic Repair. It may take up to three attempts to repair the computer successfully.

 

Edit: If Automatic Repair does not work then download BootRepair. Burn the iso to a CD or DVD. Boot and select Recommend Repair. It would be best if you could connect the laptop to the internet using an Ethernet connection. Even though you see Ubuntu the disk also works for Windows.

 

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair

 

https://sourceforge.net/p/boot-repair-cd/home/Home/


Edited by JohnC_21, 05 June 2018 - 11:52 AM.


#5 cakepro

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Posted 05 June 2018 - 02:37 PM

So, do you think doing option 2 would mean I lose all of my fonts?  I have thousands of paid fonts stored in c:windows/fonts.  I don't think I have any program files stored with programs.  But I absolutely cannot lose pictures, the contents of my download folder, or documents.

 

Thinking about trying to do that linux thing.  

 

In any case, will Windows be a new install anyway I go?  I really thought that by going back to the restore point, things would go back to normal. :( 



#6 JohnC_21

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Posted 05 June 2018 - 03:03 PM

If by option 2 you mean Automatic Repair, you will not lose your files. Also, you will not lose your files if you use BootRepair.

 

You will not know if you need a new install until you try the Automatic Repair for 3 attempts and if that fails the bootable BootRepair.



#7 cakepro

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Posted 11 June 2018 - 09:13 PM

Hi again.

 

I was never able to get to the worry wheel to try initiating the automatic repair by turning off and on three times.  No matter what I did, only the BIOS screen would come up.

 

I ordered a Sabrent enclosure and pulled my files onto my husband's laptop.  Then I got cocky and opted for a new install of Windows 10 without burning an ISO image of my hard drive.  I read a bunch of other posts on the net where people were claiming that reinstalling Windows simply repaired it.  That was not the case for me.  All of my files are still on my D drive, thank God, but it literally is a brand new install of Windows 10.  All of my programs and most tragically, my Outlook file is gone.  The program files seem to be in a folder called Windows.old but there are no .pst files on my laptop, not even in all of my copied files that are on my husband's laptop.

 

It is IMPERATIVE that I get the Outlook file back.  Is it possibly hidden?  I never backed anything up and I know how incredibly stupid that is and I am wallowing in the misery of my own stupidity.

 

I don't even mind reinstalling all of my programs and going through the painstaking process of rebuilding my desktop and all that jazz, but please, for the love of all that is holy, is there any way to restore Outlook?  Ironically, I have all of my software product keys saved in emails.  

 

Thank you so much for any help you may be able to provide.

 

Oh, I did try the "Restore previous version" and it failed.  ALso, the only restore point is the one that was created when this new install took place.

 

HALP! 



#8 JohnC_21

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Posted 12 June 2018 - 08:07 AM

That Outlook file may be gone. Firstly download Everything and do a search for all psts.  The search would be *.pst. Is your pst found? If not on another computer download Testdisk. Unzip the file to a folder on the USB flash drive. Download the 32bit version even if you have 64bit Windows. Attach the USB flash drive to your computer and scan the drive.

 

Edit: Add Everything link. Download this to a USB flash drive on another computer and run. From a USB flash drive the search term would be

c:\*.pst

https://www.cgsecurity.org/wiki/PhotoRec_Step_By_Step

 

In the unzipped folder is a file called PhotoRec. Do not use QphotoRec. Run the program and at the screen showing File Options only select PST.

 

PhotoRec_src.png

 

PhotoRec_files.png

You do not want to select any other extension. Select Free to only scan the unallocated Space since Everything did not find the file. Any pst files recovered will default to the folder on the USB flash drive. The files are recovered in Real Time so the USB flash drive must have enough space available for the pst file(s).

 

It is best you do not use your computer as writing to the hard drive would give less of chance for recovery. The best way is to stop using the computer, remove the hard drive and attach it to another computer using a USB adapter and scanning on another computer.


Edited by JohnC_21, 12 June 2018 - 08:29 AM.





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