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Enabling Group Policy Editor in Win10 Home - Will this Work? Is it Legit?


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#1 britechguy

britechguy

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Posted 26 May 2018 - 08:35 PM

The absence of Group Policy Editor in Windows 10 Home repeatedly causes consternation to those who are sophisticated Windows users who happen to be dealing with a Windows 10 Home machine.

 

I was just referred to this article:  https://www.itechtics.com/easily-enable-group-policy-editor-gpedit-msc-in-windows-10-home-edition/ 

 

I downloaded the .bat file and opened it in edit mode.  From what I can tell it seems to be entirely legitimate and uses built-in Win10 utilities to enable functionality that is already present, but strategically not enabled, as Windows 10 Home ships.

 

There are others here who know far more about both Command Prompt batch files and the various commands including pushd and dism that are employed by it.

 

I can see nothing in this that suggests that anything illegal/not permissible for discussion on Bleeping Computer is being used.  If I am somehow mistaken in that, please report this topic and it will be promptly removed.  As a moderator I am certainly not condoning doing anything that would violate forum rules, and if I'm doing so it's out of ignorance, not nefarious intent.

 

The title asks it all.   What say you all who've "Been there, done that, got the T-Shirt" with sophisticated batch script creation and advanced Windows utilities?

 

 


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


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#2 britechguy

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Posted 26 May 2018 - 09:39 PM

Well, I have received some heartening information from someone in "another part of my world" who's an acknowledged Windows 10 expert, Joseph Lee.  His response:

 

Yes – Group Policy can be used to control certain advanced functions of local features. In the very old days (for us, 2015), this was the place to effectively turn off Cortana “forever” besides using Settings app.

As for steps involved: I can confirm it works despite me using Windows 10 Pro. The batch file will:

 

  1. Look for Group Policy client extensions and tools packages by traversing C:\Windows\Servicing\Packages folder.
  2. The full path of the package file will be saved to a temporary file.
  3. Invokes DISM to add the requested packages.

 

Caveats:

  1. This whole thing won’t work on Windows 10 S or Windows 10 in S mode because S mode does not let you access command-line tools by default.
  2. Because DISM is involved, you need to run the batch file from an elevated command processor (Command Prompt and PowerShell will work, but not WSL).
  3. If you run this on an edition of Windows 10 that already supports Group Policy, it will still work, but it has no effect.

 

Note that not all problems require you to visit Group Policy or Windows Registry.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 





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