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Stop updates in Windows 10 Pro


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#1 Candid-Latavia

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Posted 25 May 2018 - 01:44 AM

Hello everyone, I been in a problem since many days due to windows automatic updates. Though I'm working at my home as a content writer.  While working on my lapi just in 2 weeks. I get a message for updates. I have been looking for an option to stop this updates for me but it doesn't work out.

 

In every 2 weeks, it asks for updates, when I update it, it takes almost 1 hours to complete the process which consumes my most of time in waiting. If anyone knows the solution let me know, please.


Edited by Platypus, 25 May 2018 - 02:01 AM.
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#2 dreamertr

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Posted 25 May 2018 - 02:50 AM

Hello everyone, I been in a problem since many days due to windows automatic updates. Though I'm working at my home as a content writer.  While working on my lapi just in 2 weeks. I get a message for updates. I have been looking for an option to stop this updates for me but it doesn't work out.

 

In every 2 weeks, it asks for updates, when I update it, it takes almost 1 hours to complete the process which consumes my most of time in waiting. If anyone knows the solution let me know, please.

 

Hello Candid-Latavia,

Which version of Windows 10 are you using?

OS build is the build number which will be shown up in Command Prompt (cmd).

 
From new to old
▶ Version 1803 (OS build 17134)
▶ Version 1709 (OS build 16299)
▶ Version 1703 (OS build 15063)
▶ Version 1607 (OS build 14393)
▶ Version 1511 (OS build 10586)

 

Each version has different setups. But each version/configuration is better than the past one.

 

There is a workaround:

You can disable the Windows Update Service.

Go to

-> Control Panel 

-> Open Administrative tools. ("C:\ProgramData\Microsoft\Windows\Start Menu\Programs\Administrative Tools")

-> Open Services

    -> Find the "Windows Update" service and double click on it to open the option window.Change the Startup option from "Manual" to "Disabled".

 

To go to services there are two shortcuts I know.

 

- Please copy this %windir%\system32\services.msc and past it to your "windows file explorer" window and press "Enter". The Services window will open. And than apply the last step (in red) above.

 

- Or press the windows logo and the "r" letter on your keyboard together (winlogo+r). The Run windows will appear. Paste %windir%\system32\services.msc to the field Open: and hit "Enter" on keyboard or click the "OK" button below. The Services window will open. And than apply the last step (in red) above.

 
I hope this article will help you out.

Edited by dreamertr, 25 May 2018 - 02:51 AM.


#3 dmccoyks

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Posted 25 May 2018 - 04:20 PM

Nice easy to use tool:

 

Windows Update Minitool

http://www.majorgeeks.com/files/details/wumt_wrapper_script.html



#4 pcpunk

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Posted 26 May 2018 - 07:55 AM

Does the Advanced Options in Windows Update not work for this?  I have this set on my Pro Install.

https://www.computerworld.com/article/3232632/microsoft-windows/how-to-block-windows-10-april-2018-update-from-installing.html


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#5 dc3

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Posted 26 May 2018 - 09:40 AM

Depending on the version of Windows 10 there are several ways to disable the automatic updates.  One method would be to set your Ethernet connection to Metered.  I Windows Professional, Enterprise, and Education you can use the Group Policy Editor.  You could simply stop the update from being installed.  There are edits for the registry which can be used to stop the updates, this is a little more complicated.  But I agree with dremertr that disabling the Windows Update service is the easiest way to accomplish this.  I've added some graphics and perhaps easier instructions to make this easier for the uninitiated.

 

Press the Windows key OS4o0pO.png and the R key to open the Run box. 

 

When the Run box opens type in services.msc, click OK.  Scroll down to Windows Update service and double click on the service.

 

Under Startup type click the down arrow and select Disabled, click on Apply, then OK.

 

hllFNCi.png

 

 

 

 

 

dreamertr has suggested the best way to stop the Windows updates.


Edited by dc3, 26 May 2018 - 09:42 AM.

Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#6 britechguy

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Posted 26 May 2018 - 09:51 AM

Just remember, if you're doing this, you cannot leave the service disabled "forever" if you wish to have a fully functioning Windows 10 that's receiving ongoing security updates.  Each major Version of Windows 10 goes out of support approximately 1.5 years from its original introduction (see:  https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/13853/windows-lifecycle-fact-sheet).

 

If you intend to stay with the Windows 10 ecosystem you must allow Windows 10 to do feature updates, even if you rig things such that they only occur when you wish for them to occur by turning the update service back on.

 

Also, I have never seen a feature update be applied that does not turn the Windows Update service back on, so you will have to take whatever steps you've chosen to take again immediately afterward to turn off Windows Update.   As a general rule I don't recommend it.  Under the current conditions with Version 1803 I can understand doing so for "mission critical" machines where even the chance of downtime from a problematic feature update cannot be tolerated.  I'd still turn it back on once it appears clear that the issues many have been seeing with this feature update have been remedied.  When it's off you don't even get security patches unless you want to have to constantly be checking the Microsoft Update Catalog and downloading and installing them yourself.


Edited by britechguy, 26 May 2018 - 09:53 AM.

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

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#7 pcpunk

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Posted 26 May 2018 - 11:53 AM

Depending on the version of Windows 10 there are several ways to disable the automatic updates. 

 

One method would be to set your Ethernet connection to Metered.  I Windows Professional, Enterprise, and Education you can use the Group Policy Editor.  

We are talking about Pro here, so why not just use the built in tool for most, instead of Group Policy Editor?

 

I do know about Metered connection.

 

 

In every 2 weeks, it asks for updates, when I update it, it takes almost 1 hours to complete the process which consumes my most of time in waiting. If anyone knows the solution let me know, please.

I'm guessing Candid-Latavia has Limited Internet service.  

 

Can you tell us Candid-Latavia, what you get when you do a speedtest?  here.


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#8 dc3

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Posted 26 May 2018 - 12:37 PM

 

Depending on the version of Windows 10 there are several ways to disable the automatic updates. 

 

One method would be to set your Ethernet connection to Metered.  I Windows Professional, Enterprise, and Education you can use the Group Policy Editor.  

We are talking about Pro here, so why not just use the built in tool for most, instead of Group Policy Editor?

 

I do know about Metered connection.

 


 

Glad you asked.  I felt it was important for those following this topic who are not already familiar with the different means of stopping the Windows update. :thumbup2:


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#9 James Litten

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Posted 26 May 2018 - 02:52 PM

This has been a problem for many small businesses and individual businesses that we deal with.

They often run into situations where Microsoft's scheduling of an update interferes with their work because they have a dynamic work schedule and not a standard 9 to 5 operation.

Our current recommendation to clients is to try and let updates run as soon as you can since most problems are with people delaying the updates only to have Microsoft force you to update later which usually happens when you need the computer or are running a job that Windows does not recognize as critical. My favorite instance was watching an esports event where suddenly, one by one, the caster's PCs began doing lengthy Windows updates in the middle of a tournament.

At first we tried changing settings for clients but it became a 'cat and mouse' game where the settings were either changed back silently or were eventually outright ignored.

This is Windows. This is how it is now. You do not own it, you kind of rent it. You are not the 'end all, be all' root administrator of it. A team at Microsoft is.

It's not neccesarily bad but it is different from how Windows used to be.

Britechguy's post above is a very good assessment of the situation.

People who do not wish to do this need to consider alternatives to Windows. That's kind of huge for most users and there is no easy choice and everyone is different.

If you want to try to move to Apple's eco-system then you pretty much have to take an all or nothing plunge into it but if you want to move to Linux, you can test the waters for a while and slowly acclimate yourself to it. I usually recommend using VirtualBox to set up a virtual machine on your system of either Ubuntu or Linux Mint (Cinnamon) for typical Windows users to see if it is possible for them to do their work tasks in that environment before committing to it fully.

If after a few weeks or even months you feel comfortable with moving then make a full backup of your Windows computer, remove the hardrive with Windows on it(in case you change your mind this allows you to put it back in and pick up where you left off), put in a brand new hard drive and install the flavor of Linux you like on it, restore your data from the backup (files, docs, pictures, etc) and live without fear of 'suddenly a 2 hour update appeared'

But be warned. No system is perfect and there will be things that bug you about anything you choose.

However, being proficient with more than one option will help you avoid a reliance on something that may suddenly become detrimental to your ability to perform when you need it most.

Kind of a rant but hope it helps someone



#10 britechguy

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Posted 26 May 2018 - 05:13 PM

Kind of a rant but hope it helps someone

 

Speaking the truth, without candy-coating it, but using measured tone and not overheated rhetoric, is hardly a rant.

 

People need to understand that Windows as a Service is not going away and what that means in terms of system administration, whether over only their own personal computers or hundreds to thousands in a large enterprise.

 

If they cannot allow updates using the controls available to them to schedule them during "off hours" then your advice (which so happens to be what I do) to apply updates as soon as is convenient during working hours when you are notified that they have been installed and a restart is needed is best practice.

 

If none of the above is considered to be reasonable, an operating system other than Windows will be required.   As you've noted, every single OS has its pluses and minuses, and in the case of large entities, one must take into account just how disruptive an OS change would be as opposed to finding a way to work under Windows as a Service.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#11 pcpunk

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Posted 26 May 2018 - 08:48 PM

I'd rather complain till they change it.


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#12 britechguy

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Posted 26 May 2018 - 08:58 PM

I'd rather complain till they change it.

 

Good luck with that.  Where I come from that is called, "P*ssing into the wind."


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#13 pcpunk

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Posted 26 May 2018 - 09:05 PM

How else do expect to change things, by just lying down and taking it?  You won't catch me buying a Windows 10 machine either, that's how I show my disapproval.  I simply don't buy products I don't believe in.


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#14 britechguy

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Posted 26 May 2018 - 09:34 PM

How else do expect to change things, by just lying down and taking it?  You won't catch me buying a Windows 10 machine either, that's how I show my disapproval.  I simply don't buy products I don't believe in.

 

Not buying something you don't want makes sense and is the best way in the marketplace to register your disapproval.

 

I think it's silly to talk about "lying down and taking it" when a major corporation has made a design decision you (for any you) don't like but know that they will not reverse for any individual or small group.

 

Operating systems, as I have said on many occasions, are the "Swiss Army Knife" of software.  They must do many things well, but very little perfectly because compromises have to be made in order to make a "Swiss Army Knife."   Windows as a Service is no less legitimate than what came before, it's just different.

 

If you don't like it, don't buy it.  But complaining about something that is never, ever going to change because you (for any you) don't like it at length and until your blood pressure rises is not the best use of one's time and energy.   I see an awful lot of that.  One must pick battles one has at least some slight chance of winning (unless one is a masochist - and some are).

 

Note that you said, "I'd rather complain till they change it."  They're not gonna change it.  It really is that simple, and that's obvious, too.


Edited by britechguy, 26 May 2018 - 09:36 PM.

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 





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