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Possible issue with 1803 download


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#1 achevy

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Posted 23 May 2018 - 08:02 AM

Yesterday I received the 1803 feature update but it failed to install the first time. I received the error 0x8024200d as a reason. This download happened without my knowing, I was focused on something else. I restarted and the feature update began to download (in Windows Update), and it successfully downloaded, but took about 3, 3 and a half hours - way longer than I can remember any of this going.



I set next Monday as my restart date for this but I'd like to get this over with as soon as I can, easier to see what if anything went wrong. Ordinarily, I think I'd shrug something like this off, but I've heard about the issues with this update (can't tell if they're more prevalent than they've been for other updates like this) and didn't want to risk anything. I've never had anything like what I described happen, should I be okay or do I have to perhaps tinker around some more? If possible I'd like to avoid a re-download/fresh reinstall.

Some specs:
Microsoft Windows 10 Home
10.0.1.16299 Build 16299
Dell Inspiron 5559
x64-based PC
Intel® Core™ i3-6100U CPU @ 2.30GHz, 2301 Mhz, 2 Core(s), 4 Logical Processor(s)
BIOS Mode: UEFI

Edited by achevy, 23 May 2018 - 08:02 AM.


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#2 britechguy

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Posted 23 May 2018 - 08:14 AM

It is my personal sense that this particular feature update is a bit more "buggy" than anything since Version 1607 has been.  The difference seems to be that the bugs, while widespread, affect some as yet imperfectly defined cohort(s) of machines while others run perfectly smoothly.

 

If your machine has been put in an update cohort, and clearly it has, and you've already had one "burp" where an attempt to update has aborted I would strongly suggest you get yourself an external backup drive (if you don't already have one) and take a full system image backup before the next restart attempt.  You should be doing this anyway, regardless of Windows Update status.

 

If the next update does not take at restart, then do a web search on the error code you get back from it and see if any of the factors that have been identified as triggering that error may apply to you and whether you can do what's necessary to rectify that factor/those factors.

 

My general piece of advice is to do what I've suggested above anyway, but instead of waiting for the next download and restart sequence (unless the download is done already) is to follow the instructions for Updating Windows 10 using the Windows 10 ISO file.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

     Presenting the willfully ignorant with facts is the very definition of casting pearls before swine.

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#3 achevy

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Posted 23 May 2018 - 09:08 AM

 

It is my personal sense that this particular feature update is a bit more "buggy" than anything since Version 1607 has been.  The difference seems to be that the bugs, while widespread, affect some as yet imperfectly defined cohort(s) of machines while others run perfectly smoothly.
 
If your machine has been put in an update cohort, and clearly it has, and you've already had one "burp" where an attempt to update has aborted I would strongly suggest you get yourself an external backup drive (if you don't already have one) and take a full system image backup before the next restart attempt.  You should be doing this anyway, regardless of Windows Update status.
 
If the next update does not take at restart, then do a web search on the error code you get back from it and see if any of the factors that have been identified as triggering that error may apply to you and whether you can do what's necessary to rectify that factor/those factors.
 
My general piece of advice is to do what I've suggested above anyway, but instead of waiting for the next download and restart sequence (unless the download is done already) is to follow the instructions for Updating Windows 10 using the Windows 10 ISO file.

 

I've already backed everything up. I always do that before updates/undertakings like this, and I figured that it would be an especially good time with how funky 1803 seems to be. : p

Apparently the 0x8024200d error code means that some files in the download are corrupt or missing. I ran sfc /scannow and it came up clean. So I'm still just lost. I've never had that before with any Win10 updates.

Not sure what you mean by the update not taking at restart. I delayed it until Monday and haven't tried to get the update going at any point. Wasn't going to mess with anything until I had an idea about what was going on.

Honestly at this point I'm going back and forth on this. I could bite the bullet and just get 1803 set up with the ISO like you linked, but I'm probably leaning towards deferring it indefinitely. I know there's supposed to be a way to do that with advanced options in the Update Center but I haven't found it. I know nothing about what deferring the 1803 would do to 1709 - would it continue to run as-is (Windows Defender/Adobe updates continuing as usual, no hangs/freezes/lags, generally running as well as it is currently)? This whole process has me somewhat weirded out.

#4 britechguy

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Posted 23 May 2018 - 09:33 AM

You cannot defer updates indefinitely in any consumer edition of Windows 10 and you'd have to be insane to want to.  As soon as a version goes out of support you stop getting any updates, including security patches, to it.

 

Given what you've mentioned as the cause of that error code, that would give me a great deal of relief.  Who among us, when downloading even small files like images, has never encountered a corruption at one point or another.  The idea that one would occasionally creep in during the download of data as massive as is involved in a Windows 10 feature update should be unsurprising.

 

SFC does not scan anything other than your OS system files, hence the name, "System File Checker."  Files downloaded as part of a feature update are not a part of the active OS system files, so they're not going to be checked.

 

What I mean by the update not taking on restart is the update not taking on restart.  You've already experienced that once.  You could experience it again when the next restart with update attempt is made.  You'll note I said "next update" which would be the next one, which you've scheduled for Monday.

 

For myself, I have always suggested the ISO method and, with one exception (so far) for someone else on these forums I have never had it fail when there have been prior failures via the usual Windows Update mechanism.  It also saves having to go through a possible "next download" of the ISO (or something very nearly equivalent) only to have all that time [I'm on DSL, so it takes hours] wasted if there's a burp in the update process.  Once you have that ISO and have created bootable media you can use it as many times as needed, doing whatever fix tweaks as might be indicated between update attempts, and never have to worry about losing it or needing to download it yet again.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

     Presenting the willfully ignorant with facts is the very definition of casting pearls before swine.

             ~ Brian Vogel

 

 

 

              

 


#5 achevy

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Posted 23 May 2018 - 06:32 PM

So if I go the ISO method, what do I do, if anything, with the update that's already downloaded? That seems like a silly question but I don't want to touch anything until I (mostly) know what I'm doing. The download was something like 20gb (estimate) and I'm not sure where specifically it is in C:\Windows\SoftwareDistribution...if it's there. There's one file folder from Monday that might be it, but I can't tell for certain. I do apologize for a question that seems like it has an obvious answer. I'm just interested in grabbing as much info as I can to ensure I don't inadvertently nuke my OS or anything. Seems like it's easier to word this in a forum post then in Google. :)

#6 britechguy

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Posted 23 May 2018 - 08:54 PM

If you already have another round of the update downloaded, and you simply delayed restart, I would definitely at least let that try to apply normally.  Your error code indicates that the original attempt was cursed by a corrupted file; this second one might not be.

 

I would progress to the ISO method only if a pending update were allowed to attempt to apply and failed.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

     Presenting the willfully ignorant with facts is the very definition of casting pearls before swine.

             ~ Brian Vogel

 

 

 

              

 


#7 achevy

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Posted 24 May 2018 - 10:30 AM

Went that route, and from everything I can it went smoothly. Took an hour and a half or so to download, which seems to be the normal time for these updates and I, everything seems to be running well...just going to keep an eye on it for the next few days to make sure nothing goes screwy. Hopefully all this worry on my part was for nothing. Thanks for the help. :)

#8 britechguy

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Posted 24 May 2018 - 10:34 AM

You're welcome.

 

Version 1803 seems to be suffering from a number of bugs for a significant number of users, but not all users are experiencing the same bugs nor the same number.

 

I just hit a major one last night, but it wasn't a direct result of the Version 1803 update but of a "Patch Tuesday" update to Version 1803 from this past Tuesday.  My rant about MS attempting to force me to create a PIN is in the discussion section.  What's more interesting is that based on the topic I found, and added to, in the Feedback Hub this issue was known about weeks ago in the insider versions.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

     Presenting the willfully ignorant with facts is the very definition of casting pearls before swine.

             ~ Brian Vogel

 

 

 

              

 





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