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Using XP in 2018


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#1 grupaul

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Posted 22 May 2018 - 03:08 AM

its fine.....i would just not recommend doing any online banking, or purchases

 

you might want to look into using linux mint as an operating system, it is very similar to XP, and the computer would likely run much faster

 

My parents still use XP. How come it's not recommended for online banking or purchases? Is there a breach in the system? It's easily hacked? 

 

Mod Edit:  Split from https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/677744/can-i-still-use-xp/ - Hamluis.


Edited by hamluis, 22 May 2018 - 07:31 AM.


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#2 mikey11

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Posted 22 May 2018 - 06:49 AM

 

its fine.....i would just not recommend doing any online banking, or purchases

 

you might want to look into using linux mint as an operating system, it is very similar to XP, and the computer would likely run much faster

 

My parents still use XP. How come it's not recommended for online banking or purchases? Is there a breach in the system? It's easily hacked? 

 

 

 

because there are no more security updates



#3 ranchhand_

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Posted 22 May 2018 - 11:15 AM

Remember that XP as an OS was great in it's day, but that was 15 years ago, believe it or not. The structure of XP is old, and will not permit patching any more for weaknesses that hackers can easily exploit. Right now, the only thing protecting you is your internet router firewall, and as excellent as those are, they are not infallible.

You are a sitting duck using XP for your online banking, purchases or CC payments. Trust me, friend, it may be inconvenient to upgrade your OS, but if you have ever gone through trying to straighten out your credit when your identity is stolen, you will know what hell is.

https://www.identitytheft.gov/


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#4 britechguy

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Posted 22 May 2018 - 04:19 PM

 

because there are no more security updates

 

 

And have not been since April 8, 2014, when extended support for Windows XP (and that was for business, it might have been earlier for home) was ended.

 

OSes, in any particular version, have a functional life.   Windows XP, as a fully functioning OS that's safe to use for most of the things that most of us do on a computer that involves interaction with cyberspace, has not been for some time now.

 

Not to mention that even the last versions of application software that were compatible with XP would probably bog down the hardware on which XP was originally loaded something awful.

 

It's time to transition to Linux or Windows 10 (well past time, actually).


Brian AKA Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

 

     In a modern society where everyone thinks their opinion deserves to be heard nothing annoys me more than individuals who mistake their personal preferences for fact.

         ~ Commenter TheCruyffGurn on the The Guardian website, 8/13/2014

 

              

 


#5 JohnC_21

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Posted 22 May 2018 - 06:21 PM

And have not been since April 8, 2014, when extended support for Windows XP (and that was for business, it might have been earlier for home) was ended.

 

 

There is the registry hack to make an XP computer look POSReady with updates till 2019 but that is even getting to be a kludge.

 

If all somebody does is browse the internet, check email, do online purchases, and some online backing then a chromebook is a good choice.


Edited by JohnC_21, 22 May 2018 - 06:24 PM.


#6 britechguy

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Posted 22 May 2018 - 07:48 PM

John,

 

          I hadn't really thought about a Chromebook, but you are absolutely correct in your assessment for those uses.

 

          I guess I just really can't, at any level, understand the desire to hold on to something that is dead, really and truly dead, and on top of it obsolete, unstable (I remember XP well, and while it was ahead of 95 & 98, I can't imagine not moving to Windows 7 ages ago, but not now), and not safe to use for typical activities at this point in time.

 

          I have clients at the retirement facility down the street who don't cling to stuff like Windows XP.  I just don't get it!


Brian AKA Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

 

     In a modern society where everyone thinks their opinion deserves to be heard nothing annoys me more than individuals who mistake their personal preferences for fact.

         ~ Commenter TheCruyffGurn on the The Guardian website, 8/13/2014

 

              

 


#7 justindaniels

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Posted 12 June 2018 - 12:58 PM

I still use XP, and think it's a very good OS. My computer also runs Windows 7, so to do anything important on the Internet, I use that OS. But, XP is still a decent operating system except for high-risk activities. I have grown up using XP, and I don't plan to switch away very soon!



#8 hamluis

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Posted 13 June 2018 - 12:30 PM

The question...or point...does not center around whether XP is "good' or "functional" or any other adjective that might be used.

 

The point is that time has superceded the useful life of XP...if one cares at all about "computer security", "personal data" and such.  The clock has run out on the time that Microsoft is not willing to put any effort into trying to secure an O/S that is not its current product, has known security vulnerabilities which are not/will not ever be addressed.  The products released post-XP...are all light years ahead of XP when it comes to "computer security.  The fact that official support of XP was dropped in 2014 and that we are now midway through 2018...should be indicative enough for even the most clueless person who understands what "computer security" might mean.  Even that person must feel that he/she does not want an unknown partner perusing/misusing the "personal data' stored daily on "the system".  Even that person must understand why some programs provide "daily" updates for the software designed to help Windows protect itself.  Even that person...must understand that "unsupported" is a nice way of saying "You need a better product than this one if you intend to deal with momentary/daily battle against malware from malcontents.

 

Running an O/S that needs protection from such...when the developer and other partners...have long ceased to provide such for said O/S...well, it's a user option...but it's an option that carries great risks...and the risks involved increase every day...and these risks can be minimized by following basic/fundamental "safe computing" practices.  Of which...the first MUST be...run an O/S that is supported and not out-of-step with the real computer-user concerns of today.

 

Louis



#9 cafejose

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Posted 15 June 2018 - 12:10 AM

A very unrefined thought here:  Buy a cheap new computer with Windows 10, or as also suggested above - buy a new Chromebook (also cheap in price).

 

A couple years ago, I found a laptop computer with Windows 10, for less than $300.



#10 Windows10User

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Posted 16 June 2018 - 10:22 AM

Since Windows XP support ended in April 8th 2014, Microsoft won't offer any security updates or technical support for the product. It's insecure to use Windows XP since it hasn't received a update since 2014 (apart from the WannaCry patch in May 2017). Running Windows XP means that hackers can use security holes in Windows XP that haven't been patched since 2014.

 

Many web browsers have also discontinued Windows XP support:

Internet Explorer (6-8) on XP: EOL: 2014-04-08

Google Chrome on XP or Vista: April 2016

Mozilla Firefox ESR on XP or Vista: Supported until August 2018

Opera: Opera 36 is the last version of Opera for XP or Vista and will continue to receive security updates for the foreseeable furture

 

With an older, outdated web browsers you'll see less web standard compliance as time goes on and you'll again be exposed to more security vulnerabilities.   

 

Internet security companies have mostly also dropped XP support so your choice of AV programs are limited as time goes on leaving you more vulnerable to malware and cyber attacks.

 

If your XP system is on a Intel Core 2 Duo or better with at least 2GB of RAM you should be able to install Windows 10 to replace XP. You can use programs like StartIsBack or Classic Shell (Classic Shell is no longer in development) to mimic a XP start menu to help with the transition to Windows 10. You can use SpyBot Anti-Beacon to block Windows 10 telemetry if you're concerned about Windows 10 spying on you. 



#11 justindaniels

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Posted 16 June 2018 - 10:19 PM

My computer runs windows 7 also, as I said, so I can use that for anything important. But, isn't basic web browsing (e.g. watching YouTube videos and doing Google searches) on XP safe if I have an up-to-date antivirus program like avast antivirus? (I may get a new computer soon, but I still would like to use my old XP laptop also.)



#12 ranchhand_

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Posted 17 June 2018 - 07:29 AM

 

isn't basic web browsing (e.g. watching YouTube videos and doing Google searches) on XP safe if I have an up-to-date antivirus program like avast antivirus

Just viewing videos probably is somewhat safe unless it is porn or warez sites. Surfing the internet? Read the posts above. If antiviruses were all we need for complete protection, then why bother with a firewall, and why do all computer help websites such as this one have huge post-lines of people asking help for infections??

In addition, Avast is not one of the better AVs by any means.

Everyone here has told you the same thing; if you want to accept their advice, then you will save yourself problems. I you do not want to accept their advice, then so be it.

The greatest antivirus program on earth will not stop a compromised website, or a hacker attack.


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