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looking at dual booting Linux and Windows 10


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#1 Notlad

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Posted 21 May 2018 - 10:13 AM

hello 

 

I have been looking at the different versions of Linux OS. Which one should I do?

 

The laptop I would use is a Compaq Presaio CQ57 that has these specs

 

CPU- AMD C-50 1 GHz

RAM- DDR3 SDRAM 1600MHz 4 GB

Hard Drive- 250 GB 

OS- Windows 10 home

 

 

Thanks



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#2 Viper_Security

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Posted 21 May 2018 - 11:50 AM

I would Recommend either Linux Mint or Peppermint OS 8. both should scream on that machine. both are easy to use and figure out. and both are based on mint.

 

Linux Mint

 

Peppermint OS 8


Edited by Viper_Security, 21 May 2018 - 11:51 AM.

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#3 MadmanRB

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Posted 21 May 2018 - 12:21 PM

Indeed, though that hard drive is a bit small for a dualboot since windows is a space hog.

You may wish to invest in a larger capacity drive before diving into linux, otherwise you are covered


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#4 paul88ks

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Posted 21 May 2018 - 02:14 PM

hello 

 

I have been looking at the different versions of Linux OS. Which one should I do?

 

The laptop I would use is a Compaq Presaio CQ57 that has these specs

 

CPU- AMD C-50 1 GHz

RAM- DDR3 SDRAM 1600MHz 4 GB

Hard Drive- 250 GB 

OS- Windows 10 home

 

 

Thanks

I agree about Linux Mint or Peppermint OS but I think your hard drive is too small to do a dual boot. Try using an external drive to install Linux on. Technically it would still be a dual boot machine but the external drive would be removable.



#5 Viper_Security

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Posted 21 May 2018 - 02:38 PM

Spoiler

 

How on earth is 250gb too small? i have 3 Os's on my 255gb ssd. it's more than enough space, windows 10 is taking up 11gb. that's not a lot.


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#6 paul88ks

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Posted 21 May 2018 - 03:48 PM

Well, you can put 2 or 3 OS's on a 256GB SSD ,but it's not going to leave a lot of room for anything else. Considering that you have to overprovision for the SSD,which takes about 10% of your SSD.



#7 NickAu

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Posted 21 May 2018 - 05:36 PM

250 GiB is heaps partition 40 GiB for Linux and that leaves 210 for Whingedos.

 

Where did the Op say they had a SSD?



#8 paul88ks

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Posted 21 May 2018 - 08:02 PM

Well -  I don't know what you guys put on your computers. I have lots of videos,movies,and music on mine -so 256 is not nearly big enough for me. If you are going to just put the OS'S on the hard drive,and keep everything else on another drive ,then you should be ok-



#9 pcpunk

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Posted 22 May 2018 - 09:56 AM

More importantly what graphics does that come with?

 

Exactly what model is it? example: CQ57-229WM  as in the -229WM part.


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#10 Notlad

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Posted 22 May 2018 - 03:37 PM

i decided not to do this. thanks for the help



#11 MadmanRB

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Posted 22 May 2018 - 03:40 PM

Any particular reason why outside of space that is?

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#12 Viper_Security

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Posted 23 May 2018 - 12:53 AM

Any particular reason why outside of space that is?

I Too am Curious why.

 

The OP did NOT say they had an SSD, I was using mine as an example.  and the next poster I'm guessing thought the OP had one.

 

Well -  I don't know what you guys put on your computers. I have lots of videos,movies,and music on mine -so 256 is not nearly big enough for me. If you are going to just put the OS'S on the hard drive,and keep everything else on another drive ,then you should be ok-

 I have over 700gb of data. I use a Terabyte HDD that is plugged into my CDBay of my laptop. and My Externals. OF COURSE one wants the install the OS's On AN SSD and use another device for data..


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#13 Mike_Walsh

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Posted 23 May 2018 - 09:24 AM

Spoiler

 

How on earth is 250gb too small? i have 3 Os's on my 255gb ssd. it's more than enough space, windows 10 is taking up 11gb. that's not a lot.

 

Yup. Currently, I have 12 Pups and Anti-x 16.1 on a 500 GB internal HDD.....and all personal stuff (movies, music, documents, etc.), AND backups, go on assorted external drives which total 5 TB.

 

Internal: around 45% full.

 

Externals: I worked it out, and it comes to about 26% of the available space is in use.

 

How does anybody work out that Windoze 10 needs between 500GB and 1 TB all to itself? I've heard this in many places on BC. That's not being a space hog.....that's just being totally selfish.

 

 

Mike.  :wink:


Edited by Mike_Walsh, 23 May 2018 - 09:26 AM.

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#14 rufwoof

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Posted 23 May 2018 - 01:08 PM

I have one 20GB ext3 (Linux i.e. Debian Full install) partition, another 20GB BSD (Open BSD full install) partition, and the rest is free float that mostly I leave set to ext3 format as that is accessible both by Linux and by BSD. Generally I consider that to be a data partition, but do install other trial OS's/things into that periodically. 300GB physical/mechanical HDD has been way more than enough for my needs. I did have Windows installed as well at one time, but that has since been dropped (XP). I do however keep data on another removable HDD that acts as a file/data server. I also have a old PC acting as a HTTPS server etc.

 

Debian and OpenBSD were my preferred main choices as they're the top of the tree. Excepting Windows and the Slackware side of things pretty much everything else are derivatives. I've set Debian up to be bootable either as a full install, or as a Live boot type choice, were it all runs in memory/ram, but can be saved (or just have any changes lost) at shutdown. Not saving changes is handy at times for testing things out, perhaps messing the system up and a reboot without saving has you back to how things were before (OK). A single trusted/respected provider providing all your OS and programs is great as well. What with trusted programs and file permissions/security measures etc. along with running internet programs (browser) under a restricted (non root) userid ... you're pretty well positioned. Of the two Debian is better for desktop setups, whereas OpenBSD is good for server type use. I also run OpenBSD as a desktop system and it works very well for me (as my particular hardware sits well with OpenBSD). Personally I find systemD a bit awkward - different to convention and increasingly I'm moving more over to OpenBSD. My next setup could very well be just a sacrificial OpenBSD desktop setup (easily/quickly reset back to pristine again) along with a file server on another LAN segment, behind its own router (so isolated, but where files are accessible via reverse ssh). Having at least one other boot choice is handy at times if/when things in one system go wrong and where you can boot that alternative as a form of admin/repair boot. A simple CD/DVD or even USB/micro-SD boot can suffice for such purposes.

 

For ease of use however I often here that Mint or Ubuntu are preferred. I've not really used either myself, other than relatively briefly. Derivatives such as Ubuntu (based on Debian) can periodically introduce problems, for instance a little whilst back Ubuntu bricked some systems with a 'upgrade' (i.e. had to reflash BIOS or whatever, or for most - throw the PC/laptop away). Changes can introduce problems or security risks, so ease of use isn't a total freebie. Ubuntu is more like Debian Testing ... so less stable/greater risks involved, but more/latter software available.

 

Fundamentally Linux is just the core kernel. Debian however have build around that and provide/modify software to a level where the kernel and those programs work well together and are secure/patched. Expanding that 'kernel only' arrangement to be more like OpenBSD - that is a complete package (OS, gui desktop, httpd server ...etc.).

 

Overall however and I suspect Viper's suggestion might be your best choice. Relatively easy to get going and perhaps install/learn LibreOffice ...etc. and then take things from there. Linux does tend to tempt you to distro-hop and it can take years before you finally settle on a particular choice and have accumulated awareness of the syntax and differences. Maybe even start with a LiveCD/USB type choice that can run without making any changes to your existing setups.


Edited by rufwoof, 23 May 2018 - 01:12 PM.

OpenBSD (-current)





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