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Macrium - If I install an SSD can I clone back to a mechanical HD?


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#1 pcumming

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Posted 19 May 2018 - 08:19 PM

I use Macrium to clone from my laptop HD to a USB hard drive.

Works great.

 

Now if I were to buy an SSD and put that in my hard drive is it possible (I am doubting it) to CLONE from the SSD to the mechanical hard drive OR must I create an image of every partition instead? And then in case of emergency I would run the bootable Macrium USB and restore the image back.

 

Why am I asking?--so I can back up the new SSD without buying a spare SSD. Rather clone if possible but since we are dealing with 2 difference architectures perhaps it cannot be done.

 

Thank you

Peter



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#2 britechguy

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Posted 19 May 2018 - 10:13 PM

My question is why you are cloning rather than using the standard system image backup and restore.

 

You can easily backup an SSD to a HDD then restore to and SSD from the HDD or any admixture thereof.

 

I actually believe you could clone, but that makes little sense unless the clone is intended as a "plug n' play" replacement disk in the event of a failure.

 

You seem to be mixing "clone" and "backup."   Unless the HDD is capable of being installed into the computer in question it makes no sense to clone the SSD to it anyway.  I would be doing full system image backups from the SSD to the HDD and restoring from the HDD should events require it.


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#3 pcumming

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Posted 19 May 2018 - 10:17 PM

Thank you. My current backup using the clone option from laptop  HDD to USB HDD is indeed intended as a clone for plug and play capability of all files. Plug it in laptop and boot away in case of HDD failure.

 

I am assuming that an image copy must be used from SSD to HDD or whatever unless I wanted plug and play capability in which I  would need another SSD.

 

Tx

Peter



#4 britechguy

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Posted 19 May 2018 - 10:41 PM

But you can't boot from an external USB HDD, but you can from a USB jump drive.  That's what's confusing me.

 

Unless the HDD you're using is a SATA (or whatever type your computer has) placed in an external case that you connect via USB, you're not going to be able to boot from it, and even then, it would have to be transplanted in to the machine in question.

 

I'm sure someone will correct me if I'm incorrect, but unless my memory is failing you simply cannot use an external USB HDD as a boot device.

 

I believe, but cannot guarantee that my memory is correct on this, that you can clone between an SSD and an HDD, both of which are installable in your machine, and have either one work regardless of what the "usual drive" happens to be.  I can't imagine that everyone who's invested in an internal SSD to replace their HDD gets a second SSD to do clones.  You could use the HDD that you just removed, when the next clone time comes, connected to the machine via a USB cable or enclosure to clone to and it should function if plugged in were the SSD to fail.


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#5 pcumming

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Posted 20 May 2018 - 08:21 AM

Cant boot from USB drive. Did not intend to. Cloning was done if internal HD failed and then I replace drive in laptop.



#6 ranchhand_

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Posted 20 May 2018 - 09:40 AM

Back to your original question: test it. MR will either do it or will give you an error message. 

Expanded suggestion: as Britechguy suggested in post#2, why are you messing with cloning? Full image backups are bullet-proof in MR, and will work every time, SSD to HDD (or the reverse), and each image is completely accessible for data retrieval.


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#7 britechguy

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Posted 20 May 2018 - 09:51 AM

why are you messing with cloning? Full image backups are bullet-proof in MR, and will work every time, SSD to HDD (or the reverse), and each image is completely accessible for data retrieval.

 

Which, when there is any reason to have the slightest doubt, the full image backup route is the way to go.   Not to mention that restores from full image backups are pretty darned fast, at least when compared with incremental backups which require a lot of "reconstruction work."   Full image backups are pretty much "load and go."


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

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#8 RolandJS

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Posted 20 May 2018 - 09:20 PM

"...But you can't boot from an external USB HDD.."

BriTechGuy, I think under certain circumstances, one can boot off of a USB-connected hard-drive, but as you imply, why do so?


Edited by RolandJS, 20 May 2018 - 09:21 PM.

"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)





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