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Computer sending fake emails


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#1 jafwiz

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Posted 15 May 2018 - 06:18 AM

I keep having a problem with my computer sending a fake email to some of my contacts that on there end they see a blue screen with Office 365. I have changed my passwords but this keeps happening. I run scans with Malwarebytes and Hitman pro.What else can I do?

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#2 buddy215

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Posted 15 May 2018 - 10:55 AM

It is likely your email address has been spoofed. How Spammers Spoof Your Email Address (and How to Protect Yourself)

 

If you could view the header of one of the emails sent to someone in your contacts you would likely see that it came from a

different IP than yours and often from a different country.

 

Just changing a password is not good enough if your email account has been compromised. Changing secret words and other

things used to verify it is YOU who is changing the email account password needs to be done, too.

 

One of your email contacts could of been compromised. Good evidence for that is if those receiving your emails would have the

same contacts in their list of email contacts.


“Every atom in your body came from a star that exploded and the atoms in your left hand probably came from a different star than your right hand. It really is the most poetic thing I know about physics...you are all stardust.”Lawrence M. Krauss
A 1792 U.S. penny, designed in part by Thomas Jefferson and George Washington, reads “Liberty Parent of Science & Industry.”

#3 jafwiz

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Posted 15 May 2018 - 09:04 PM

Thanks for the reply. I tried going to my email server website Cox and it only give the option to change password? Another thing about this problem is the person that gets the email it shows a company name like mine with a different address and my email address?

#4 buddy215

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Posted 16 May 2018 - 05:31 AM

Other Cox email users have asked Cox to use two-factor authentication. I wouldn't use an email client that

didn't require more than just a password in today's environment.

 

Have you asked those receiving the emails to look at the headers or resend one to you so you can check the

header? That is the best way to determine if the mail is actually being sent from your account and your address

not being spoofed.


“Every atom in your body came from a star that exploded and the atoms in your left hand probably came from a different star than your right hand. It really is the most poetic thing I know about physics...you are all stardust.”Lawrence M. Krauss
A 1792 U.S. penny, designed in part by Thomas Jefferson and George Washington, reads “Liberty Parent of Science & Industry.”




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