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Permissible PHOTO paper weights for certain HP inkjet printers


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#1 saluqi

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Posted 08 May 2018 - 09:10 AM

I have a friend who, having long been printer-less, is considering buying (with my help) a light duty printer - the "duties" to include photo printing.  He is an expert on form and function in dogs, and still writes articles on this and related subjects.

 

COSTCO is currently offering an HP Envy Photo 7858 at a favorable price.  I took a look at the specifications to see if they would fit my friend's needs.  I then tried to ask HP for the information I was seeking.  Unfortunately I drew a blank.

 

Those specs listed the permissible weight of PHOTO papers at 70 to 90 grams per square meter (18-22 lb).  I have to presume that is a typo or an error - that is the typical weight of ordinary typing or copy paper, not photo paper.  I myself have an older HP printer - HP Photosmart 6525 - which lists for permissible PHOTO paper weight up to 280 g/m2, that is 75 lb.  I do a lot of photographic work.  The lightest photo paper I have in stock is HP "Everyday" photo paper at 200 g/m2 (53 lb).  For better quality prints I use a photo paper (not HP) of 255 g/m2 (69 lb).  So long as I keep the pickup rollers clean, no problem with the 255 g paper.

 

So I have to believe the info in the published specs of the HP Envy Photo 7858 is a mistake.  Most printer specs list the maximum permissible weight of LETTER paper at 24 lb (heavy weight copy paper - everyday copy/letter paper is 20 lb).

 

Another feature of the HP Envy Photo 7858 is that it uses only 2 ink cartridges - one black, one tricolor.  That also suggests to me that this is not really a "serious" printer and that I should be looking elsewhere for my friend.  I am personally most familiar with HP printers, having used them from the dawn of the PC era (I still have a first generation HP LaserJet in working order <G>) but time moves on and I have no objection to trying something else.  It must, however, be simple and easy to use.  My friend struggles with the complexity of computers, so for his use I do need to create a more or less "set it and forget it" printing environment.

 

Can anyone tell me what the  real photo paper capabilities of the HP Envy Color 7858 are, and whether this might be a reasonable choice for the above described situation?

 

Thanks as always for enlightenment!

 

 



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#2 RecursiveNerd

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Posted 08 May 2018 - 09:50 AM

According to their manual their recommended photo papers are HP Premium Plus Photo Paper, HP Advanced Photo Paper, and HP Everyday Photo Paper, which range from 80lbs to 53lbs.

With that said, I've never been a fan of inkjet printers with the combination cartridges these days. If I have to get an inkjet, I much prefer ones with individual cartridges, such as this Canon. You can get aftermarket replacement cartridges for extremely cheap as well. This Canon also has individual cartridges and is a bit cheaper if cost is a factor.

#3 britechguy

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Posted 08 May 2018 - 10:20 AM

I will also weigh in that I absolutely advise anyone thinking of purchasing a printer to avoid those using tricolor cartridges like the plague.

 

Canon and Epson both make excellent printers, including very serious photo printers, that use individual ink tanks.  If one is doing any significant amount of printing with an inkjet printer then getting refillable cartridges with ARC chips or a CISS is a must do.

 

I have a Canon TS5020 and a TS6020 (the 5020 does not do automatic duplex, so it's gone to the son-in-law for now) and the print quality on both is excellent.  It seems the higher one goes up on the TSX020 line the only difference is the number of bells and whistles the machine has.  When I last checked the print resolution on all of them was the same.


Edited by britechguy, 08 May 2018 - 10:23 AM.

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#4 r.a.d.

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Posted 08 May 2018 - 12:06 PM

Just by the allowable cartridges they mention raises doubts here, as with my old HP deskjet 5550, quality photo printing required exchanging the 56 black with a 58 photo to work alongside the 57 tri-color cartridges, and with their photo paper and settings set to max dpi, results rivaled a lab.

Edit, manual link removed. I didn't realize RecursiveNerd had already posted it. :)

Edited by r.a.d., 08 May 2018 - 01:38 PM.

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#5 saluqi

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Posted 08 May 2018 - 01:07 PM

I did check out the specs for the HP Envy Photo 7858, and it does use a tricolor cartridge.  That's already a deal killer for me.  Note that my old HP PhotoSmart 6525 uses four cartridges - 3 individual color cartridges and 1 black.  To use a "photo black" cartridge I think you need the next higher printer in that series.  I'm not sure, but suspect the photo black cartridge would not fit in the PhotoSmart 6525.

 

HP is pretty sticky about refilled cartridges.  I have been using refills from COSTCO, and the printer has accepted them (under complaint <G>) but at least once I had a print quality problem and had to throw out an entire set of refills.

 

Using premium photo paper and print quality setting to "best", the PhotoSmart 6525 has produced very satisfactory quality prints.  The print menu lets you select each of the HP photo papers (53 to 80 lb) separately, and has several other options for non-HP photo papers.

 

The Canon Pixma MX922 is on sale and actually cheaper than the other at the moment.  I think it would fully suffice for my friend's needs, so thanks for that tip.  I'll look at some of the other options as well.

 

Thanks for all the help!



#6 mjd420nova

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Posted 08 May 2018 - 03:00 PM

I have had printers with individual color carts and a few with the tri-color carts.  I see no difference in the quality of the prints and have used all three grades of photo papers for  postcards and greeting cards with both types of carts.  I have many clients who would rather replace one single cartridge for color and one for black, rather than replace four at once.  I use refilled carts for everyday prints and to test photo prints before changing to HP new carts(not refilled) to do final prints.  My main source is a camera with 5K by 6K resolution, yielding a jpg file of 35 MB.  Printed, it is just a bit more than the 4800 DPI the printer can do.  Exceptional prints near lab quality when using the heavy paper.  Even does quality matte finish papers.  It's cheaper to refill than buy new all the time.  The thing I look for when doing the heaviest papers is whether the paper path has a straight through or a turn around as the heavier papers will baulk and jam.


Edited by mjd420nova, 08 May 2018 - 03:02 PM.





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