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Linux Mint promises not to spy on you.


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#1 SuperSapien64

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Posted 06 May 2018 - 07:12 PM

The Linux Mint team said that they wont be spying on you come LM 19. :https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DWsf7wA4eVU



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#2 Gary R

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Posted 07 May 2018 - 06:42 AM

See also ... https://news.softpedia.com/news/linux-mint-19-tara-won-t-collect-or-send-any-of-your-personal-or-system-data-520915.shtml



#3 pcpunk

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Posted 07 May 2018 - 07:31 AM

It's about time!


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#4 Gary R

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Posted 07 May 2018 - 11:49 AM

Of course every website you land on will still be full of trackers and beacons, and shovelling 3rd party cookies onto your machine like a navvy on piece work, but at least you won't have to worry that Mint is trying to data harvest you. :wink: :whistle:



#5 The-Toolman

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Posted 07 May 2018 - 05:21 PM

[snip]

but at least you won't have to worry that Mint is trying to data harvest you. :wink: :whistle:

emojis of confidence especially this one:whistle:    


Edited by The-Toolman, 07 May 2018 - 05:24 PM.

I'm grumpy because I can be not because I'm old.

 

The world is what you make of it, if it doesn't fit, you make alterations.

 

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#6 Condobloke

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Posted 07 May 2018 - 08:19 PM

...""like a navvy on piece work..."... :hysterical:......so true !!!


Condobloke ...Outback Australian  fed up with Windows antics...??....LINUX IS THE ANSWER....I USE LINUX MINT 18.3  EXCLUSIVELY.

“A man travels the world in search of what he needs and returns home to find it."

It has been said that time heals all wounds. I don't agree. The wounds remain. Time - the mind, protecting its sanity - covers them with some scar tissue and the pain lessens, but it is never gone. Rose Kennedy

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#7 Condobloke

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Posted 07 May 2018 - 08:49 PM

on a more serious note....the article linked by rburkartjo (over at cheesemakers linux corner) ...HERE   presents a few compelling reasons for  ubuntus data collection.

 

quote a tad...""I'm all for the idea of choosing to opt in for hardware data collection.

 

Done effectively, it allows us to expand on challenges like dual-graphics switching on select notebook PCs, oddball wireless configurations and other issues that might crop up that better hardware detection might solve.""

 

The author then goes on to explain his point of view on various points of contention......and labels his article (appropriately enough) .....

Ubuntu 18.04 Review: Tough Love

Condobloke ...Outback Australian  fed up with Windows antics...??....LINUX IS THE ANSWER....I USE LINUX MINT 18.3  EXCLUSIVELY.

“A man travels the world in search of what he needs and returns home to find it."

It has been said that time heals all wounds. I don't agree. The wounds remain. Time - the mind, protecting its sanity - covers them with some scar tissue and the pain lessens, but it is never gone. Rose Kennedy

 GcnI1aH.jpg

 

 


#8 The-Toolman

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Posted 07 May 2018 - 09:32 PM

 

on a more serious note....the article linked by rburkartjo (over at cheesemakers linux corner) ...HERE   presents a few compelling reasons for  ubuntus data collection.

 

quote a tad...""I'm all for the idea of choosing to opt in for hardware data collection.

 

Done effectively, it allows us to expand on challenges like dual-graphics switching on select notebook PCs, oddball wireless configurations and other issues that might crop up that better hardware detection might solve.""

 

The author then goes on to explain his point of view on various points of contention......and labels his article (appropriately enough) .....

Ubuntu 18.04 Review: Tough Love

 

It actually isn't as bad as it seems it's suppose to allow them to see what hardware is used etc to help better Ubuntu 18.04.

 

I'm not worried about it as it will be done with or without users consent imo and it's not like it's anything new. (Cynical I am)

 

 

https://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2018/05/this-is-the-data-ubuntu-collects-about-your-system


I'm grumpy because I can be not because I'm old.

 

The world is what you make of it, if it doesn't fit, you make alterations.

 

Under certain circumstances, profanity provides a relief denied even to prayer.  (Mark Twain)


#9 Gary R

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Posted 08 May 2018 - 12:22 AM

Letting Canonical have a better idea of what types of hardware their creation is being expected to interact with, seems like something that most sensible people would be OK with, since it will allow Canonical to improve Ubuntu in that regard. However IMO they would have done better to make it an opt in choice rather than opt out.

 

Whilst making it opt-out may get them more data to work with, it also erodes the trust between Canonical and the people who are using their product. It doesn't matter  whether their intentions are altruistic or not, people like to be consulted about what they choose to share.



#10 Condobloke

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Posted 08 May 2018 - 12:47 AM

Agreed. The most important issue between corporations such as canonical, msft, etc etc, and the general public has and always will be ...TRUST....(or lack thereof)

 

Opt in would win trust....especially if followed by a precise explanation of what is to be gathered and why.

 

Linux does not sit in the same camp as msft......we Linuxians download the OS's for Free.....and the minute it hits our hard drive, it belongs to us. We then go on to make donations to show our support. The donations take many different forms, but we all do our bit in our own way. 

 

(Linuxians = new word. Get over it )


Condobloke ...Outback Australian  fed up with Windows antics...??....LINUX IS THE ANSWER....I USE LINUX MINT 18.3  EXCLUSIVELY.

“A man travels the world in search of what he needs and returns home to find it."

It has been said that time heals all wounds. I don't agree. The wounds remain. Time - the mind, protecting its sanity - covers them with some scar tissue and the pain lessens, but it is never gone. Rose Kennedy

 GcnI1aH.jpg

 

 


#11 The-Toolman

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Posted 08 May 2018 - 06:24 AM

Opt-in / Opt out

 

That is just an option to pacify the mind. 

 

Yeah I believe and trust Canonical as much as I believe and trust Microsoft.

 

Microsoft said they are collecting user info for a better user experience.

 

Canonical says they are collecting user info to improve the Linux Disro.

 

Canonical like Microsoft has probably been gathering user information all along and just making it public in Ubuntu 18.04 just as Microsoft did in Windows 10.

 

It just makes sense since Canonical and Microsoft partnered together.


Edited by The-Toolman, 08 May 2018 - 06:41 AM.

I'm grumpy because I can be not because I'm old.

 

The world is what you make of it, if it doesn't fit, you make alterations.

 

Under certain circumstances, profanity provides a relief denied even to prayer.  (Mark Twain)


#12 britechguy

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Posted 08 May 2018 - 10:06 AM

I cannot fathom, for the life of me, why anyone would be concerned about the collection of anonymized "system health" data, no matter what OS maker is collecting it.

 

As more and more "old" (and even new) systems get OSes downloaded on them it is vital to know what issues, if any, are being encountered so that fixes can be made.  We are long past the time when any OS maker can or will attempt to build an in-house test bed of all hardware on which their OSes will be running.  It's now an impossible task.

 

The collection of system health data that cannot be traced to an individual user should be expected to be a vital, and usual, practice going forward.  In fact, it pretty much already is.

 

By the way, data collection and spying are not interchangeable terms.  The collection of anonymized system health data, not used for any nefarious purpose, is not spying in any meaningful sense of the word.  Those OSes that do this generally have this clearly stated in their license agreements.  That people choose not to read those agreements does not mean that the makers have not used the only mechanism available to them to communicate about what they're doing.  Some also use opt-in or opt-out at installation, too, but many people don't read those carefully, either.  Data collection of this nature can hardly be considered "secret" these days unless one is being willfuly ignorant.


Edited by britechguy, 08 May 2018 - 10:11 AM.

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#13 Gary R

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Posted 08 May 2018 - 04:44 PM

The issue for those that are bothered about it (and I'm not saying that I am one of those), is that a person's data is theirs, and should only be collected after they have given specific permission to do so.

 

Doesn't matter how good the reason is, or how innocuous the data is that is being collected, until permission is given, it still belongs to the person who owns the machine, and not the software creator.

 

If a EULA is clear that collection of system data is one of the conditions of use, then personally I can't see how anyone can complain when such data is collected, however, as anyone who has ever read through a few EULAs is well aware, some of them are a long, long way from being clear.



#14 pcpunk

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Posted 08 May 2018 - 05:15 PM

Very well said Gary R!!!


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#15 britechguy

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Posted 08 May 2018 - 05:44 PM

Doesn't matter how good the reason is, or how innocuous the data is that is being collected, until permission is given, it still belongs to the person who owns the machine, and not the software creator.

 

If a EULA is clear that collection of system data is one of the conditions of use, then personally I can't see how anyone can complain when such data is collected, however, as anyone who has ever read through a few EULAs is well aware, some of them are a long, long way from being clear.

 

I actually don't agree that every scrap of information about how a given piece of hardware is working in conjunction with a licensed piece of software, and nothing more than that class of information, "belongs to the person who owns the machine."   No one owns the OS they use, they are licensed to use it under the terms the maker chooses.   It is in our collective best interest that OSes are as stable as possible across as wide a range of hardware as possible.

 

I will absolutely agree that EULAs are often far from clear if one tries to plow through all of the legalese, but most also include something "in more human friendly language" covering the central parts.  It is now standard operating procedure to collect OS-to-hardware-interaction data, and has been for some time.

 

People need to understand the technology they use and why the things that are required are required.  If I hear one more person use the phrase "spying on you" to collect anonymized OS-to-hardware interaction data, without any personal data (which, by the way, Microsoft does collect if you allow "full" system health data to be collected, but you don't have to), I think I shall put my face into a pillow and scream for about five minutes.    It makes about as much sense as calling any event that strikes terror into the heart of the public "terrorism."


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 





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