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How to check a website for malicious ads


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#1 bcmo

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Posted 26 April 2018 - 02:10 PM

I've seen a message on social media that an ad on a website is virus laden and harmful to one's device even without clicking on it. Is there a way I could check that out just to make sure?
 
Thank you.

Edited by bcmo, 26 April 2018 - 02:19 PM.


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#2 cunikcz

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Posted 26 April 2018 - 02:28 PM

Hi, try use AdBlock extension for internet browser. Or check webpage on VirusTotal. Webpage advertisement can contain Malware


Edited by cunikcz, 26 April 2018 - 02:31 PM.


#3 bcmo

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Posted 26 April 2018 - 02:33 PM

Hi, try use AdBlock extension for internet browser.

Is that a guarantee to avoid all malicious ads?

Or check webpage on VirusTotal. Webpage advertisement can contain Malware

VR rates the site as clean. But VR doesn't test the ads that are browser specific and which aren't really on the website for all users.

Is there a tool that analyzes everything on a website including all the ads and elements added by the browser or anything else?

Edited by bcmo, 26 April 2018 - 03:03 PM.


#4 Phantom010

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Posted 26 April 2018 - 04:51 PM

With extensions like Adblock Plus, uBlock Origin, or AdGuard Adblocker, you simply don't get ads, or at least very few. I'd say that's pretty good. It's impossible to guarantee you'll be 100% safe. Adblockers are part of the multi-layer security approach. Your antivirus will also alert you if an ad is malicious.


Edited by Phantom010, 26 April 2018 - 05:00 PM.


#5 bcmo

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Posted 26 April 2018 - 04:59 PM

With extensions like Adblock Plus, uBlock Origin, or AdGuard Adblocker, you simply don't get ads, or at least very few. I'd say that's pretty good. It's impossible to guarantee you'll be 100% safe. Adblockers are part of the multi-layer security approach.

So in other words there isn't much more that can be done if I already have the AdBlock Chrome extension?



#6 Phantom010

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Posted 26 April 2018 - 05:01 PM

So in other words there isn't much more that can be done if I already have the AdBlock Chrome extension?

 

You probably missed my last edit. Your antivirus will also alert you if an ad is malicious.



#7 britechguy

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Posted 26 April 2018 - 07:53 PM

Not to mention that the risk of being compromised when web browsing is greatly reduced if one is not browsing in "less than desirable" neighborhoods.

 

There is a difference between taking reasonable precautions and having unwarranted fear.  Basic safe browsing and downloading habits will keep one safe from well over 95% of things that infect.  There is very little that "sneaks on" to a computer; almost all infections are the result of unsafe browsing and/or downloading habits.


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#8 bcmo

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Posted 27 April 2018 - 09:53 AM

Not to mention that the risk of being compromised when web browsing is greatly reduced if one is not browsing in "less than desirable" neighborhoods.

 

There is a difference between taking reasonable precautions and having unwarranted fear.  Basic safe browsing and downloading habits will keep one safe from well over 95% of things that infect.  There is very little that "sneaks on" to a computer; almost all infections are the result of unsafe browsing and/or downloading habits.

Of course. I was just wondering if there was a way to check a website based on a WhatsApp message I saw (which could not even be true, but I just wanted to make sure).






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