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replacing the keyboard on a Sony Vaio SVF15


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#1 berbes

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Posted 24 April 2018 - 11:49 PM

whoever designed this model is truly a sadist. it seems sony took a keyboard and built a laptop around it, but enough of my bleeping.

ok, once you take EVERYTHING apart and can reach the KB, my question is, once you cut all the little plastic nubs that are holding the KB in place, how do you secure the new KB? in the video i've provided below, it seems the guy uses aluminum tape? is that enough? thanks for your ideas.

here is an idea of the job ahead:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0QU6SMTEJlQ



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#2 hamluis

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Posted 25 April 2018 - 06:59 AM

Google Results.

 

Louis



#3 britechguy

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Posted 25 April 2018 - 01:15 PM

This is not the only laptop using this design these days.   The keyboards in these are really not meant to be replaced, but the "top cover unit" is.

 

It's not that you can't do what you're doing, but securing the new keyboard back in place is not easy.  If you can source the whole unit you're far better off.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#4 berbes

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Posted 25 April 2018 - 03:33 PM

hello brit.  what do you mean by, "top cover unit"?   thanks!



#5 JohnC_21

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Posted 25 April 2018 - 04:12 PM

I believe the keyboard and bezel are sourced separately on this computer.

 

Bezel

 

Keyboard



#6 britechguy

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Posted 25 April 2018 - 04:23 PM

See this parts page:  http://www.pchub.com/uph/model/0--35850-1/Vaio-SVF15-Series-Fit-Fit-15E-parts.html

 

There are several different ones (colors) and backlit and non-backlit versions.  They call them the mainboard.

 

I cannot find Sony Vaio service manuals, so I'm going to use screen shots from two different HP 15-inch laptop models, the first of which has a "pop-in" keyboard that is not integrated into the "top cover" of the base of the PC:

 

hp_separate_keyboard.jpg 

 

and the second of which uses a "top cover" unit where the keyboard, mousepad, and surround are all part of one unit and are fixed to the plastic surround of the top in the same way you describe yours as being, with plastic studs that are heat melted to keep the metal (usually) keyboard retaining clip in place:

 

hp_integrated_keyboard.jpg

 

I just dealt with a Toshiba laptop that uses the all-in-one keyboard, mousepad, and surround top cover unit as shown in the second image above and it sounds like your Sony does the same, particularly based on what's at that parts page (at least some of the Sony models do).


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#7 britechguy

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Posted 25 April 2018 - 04:30 PM

I believe the keyboard and bezel are sourced separately on this computer.

 

Bezel

 

Keyboard

 

John,

 

          I really cannot speak definitively for this machine, not having seen it, but even the Toshiba I worked on had the keyboard for sale separately.  The problem was that you were never really supposed to replace it separately.   By the time you freed the support frame from the bezel on the underside it would have been well nigh impossible to put it back together in a way that likely would have held up over time.  I guess one could use plastic welder epoxy, but that's the only thing I'd be willing to try and would make no guarantee it would hold over time, particularly since the plastic on these bezels is typically "shiny" and even if roughened does not necessarily hold a glue bond well.

 

          I absolutely despise the fact that many makers are now using an integrated top cover unit made up of the bezel, keyboard, and mousepad where none can be easily dealt with alone.  Of all the parts of laptops that might need to be replaced, the keyboard has to be right up there at the top.  It's insane to make it this difficult (if you want to do a workaround) or expensive (if you don't).


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#8 JohnC_21

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Posted 25 April 2018 - 04:38 PM

 I absolutely despise the fact that many makers are now using an integrated top cover unit made up of the bezel, keyboard, and mousepad where none can be easily dealt with alone.  Of all the parts of laptops that might need to be replaced, the keyboard has to be right up there at the top.  It's insane to make it this difficult (if you want to do a workaround) or expensive (if you don't).

 

I was dealing with this years ago when design for assembly was starting to take off. It makes the end product cheaper to produce but servicing is a nightmare. I look at my old laptop and everything is accessed through panels on the back and the keyboard can be removed by taking out a few screws. 


Edited by JohnC_21, 25 April 2018 - 04:38 PM.


#9 berbes

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Posted 25 April 2018 - 07:13 PM

i've been doing this for 10 years and i'm glad you gentlemen have the same observations as i did.  i have an older, souped up elitebook laptop and it is simply built like a tank and the KB, HD and RAM and even screen is easily accessed for repair.  

 

thanks for the diagrams too!!  i gave the client the choice to spend a few more dollars and do the repair right, or i'll be forced to tape the KB in...without a warranty :).



#10 DavisMcCarn

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Posted 26 April 2018 - 07:22 AM

During manufacturing, the plastic "pins" originally stuck up through the holes in the keyboard and were then melted to form mushroom tops which held the keyboard in place.  I would have carefully cut the mushrooms off without removing the entire tops of each and then used epoxy "drops" to recreate the mushrooms.  Short of that, the best course is to replace the entire top cover assembly.


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