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Does "Windows Defender Browser Protection" Chrome Ext. Need Windows Defender?


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#1 F1Help

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Posted 18 April 2018 - 02:36 PM

Hi,

Can the "Windows Defender Browser Protection" Chrome extension be used to provide browsing protection, without running Windows Defender as an anti-virus (I use Avast)?

https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/microsoft-ports-anti-phishing-technology-to-google-chrome-extension/

I am using Windows 7.

Thanks.



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#2 britechguy

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Posted 18 April 2018 - 03:09 PM

Given the nature of what this extension does I would imagine that it would not require Windows Defender to be running as your primary antivirus, but it would require you to allow it to remain running in its "on demand scan" mode which allows it to keep updating its definition files for use for on demand scanning.  In this case something else is "borrowing" one of those files to compare against, but if it isn't being constantly kept up to date then what you're comparing against may not be accurate, thus defeating the very purpose of the extension.


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#3 quietman7

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Posted 18 April 2018 - 03:46 PM

The Windows Defender Browser Protection extension was  released for those who opted to use Google Chrome instead of the Edge browser included in Windows 10.

Windows Defender Browser Protection works by relying on a constantly updated list of malicious sites. Should you try to visit one of these sites, you'll be warned about the potential dangers. The warning screen thrown up by the extension when a malicious site is encountered is very similar to the one which is already displayed by Chrome. Some will argue that it's not possible to have too much protection, while others will see the doubling up as somewhat unnecessary.
Microsoft brings Windows Defender Browser Protection extension to Google Chrome
 

Although it uses the same name, Windows 10 Defender is not the same as Windows Defender in Windows 7/Vista since it integrates both anti-virus and anti-malware protection.
 
Windows Defender in Windows 7/Vista is an anti-malware (anti-spyware) program intended to supplement your anti-virus program, not replace it.The anti-malware protection provided by Windows Defender in Windows 7/Vista is weak, meaning it does not provide comprehensive protection and cannot prevent, detect and remove all threats at any given time. As such, many folks keep it disabled and use a more effective alternative.


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#4 britechguy

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Posted 18 April 2018 - 06:24 PM

Sorry F1Help, but quietman7 made an excellent "catch" in noticing your line about being on Windows 7, that somehow eluded me.

 

There's a world of difference between Windows Defender as implemented for Windows 8 and later than as implemented in Windows 7 and earlier for which quietman7 has already given the details.

 

My apologies for my oversight.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.  Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.

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#5 F1Help

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Posted 19 April 2018 - 08:52 AM

From reading the descriptions, it appears that the Chrome extension just checks visited sites with a database of known "bad" URLs using the SmartScreen API, showing a warning screen if necessary.  Therefore, it should not matter if the "full" Windows Defender app is used or not.



#6 britechguy

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Posted 19 April 2018 - 09:07 AM

I guess that really depends on what you mean by, 'it should not matter if the "full" Windows Defender app is used or not.'

 

It certainly would.  That URL database in all likelihood does not even exist for the pre-Windows 8 implementation of Windows Defender and in the Windows 8 and later implementation would still require that Windows Defender definitions (which would include said database) were being updated on a regular basis.

 

The Windows 10 (and I'd presume 8, but I don't have it to check) version of Windows Defender can now be run without realtime scanning as a secondary checking mechanism side-by-side with most of the major 3rd party antivirus/security suites.   It would have to be doing so, at a minimum in that mode, for the URL database to be kept up to date.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.  Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.

       ~ Mark Twain

 

 

 

              

 


#7 quietman7

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Posted 19 April 2018 - 09:20 AM

Windows Defender Browser Protection extension appears to be Microsoft's alternative to programs like McAfee WebAdvisor (formerly SiteAdvisor), WOT (Web of Trust), Google's Safe Browsing, Google's Safe Browsing, Avira Scout browser, Avira Scout browser, avast! Online Security Plugin (formerly WebRep), Symantec WS.Reputation.1, Webutation, etc.
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#8 F1Help

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Posted 20 April 2018 - 11:16 AM

I installed "Windows Defender Browser Protection" Chrome extension on Windows 7 yesterday and it installed and ran fine.  It appears to be a self-contained extension and did not mention anything about the Windows Defender app (which I don't use).



#9 britechguy

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Posted 20 April 2018 - 11:32 AM

It's interesting that there is virtually no documentation regarding this extension other than the high-level "what it does" type.

 

Even on Microsoft's own webpage for it and the Chrome Store page for it there is nothing about system requirements, etc.  The description that is available, though, suggests that all of the comparisons are done against a cloud-based database, so if that's the case there really would be no restriction on what Windows one chose to use this extension on provided it's got an up-to-date version of the Chrome browser running.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.  Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.

       ~ Mark Twain

 

 

 

              

 


#10 CamazingMe

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Posted 07 June 2018 - 06:56 PM

In this case, "Windows Defender" is being used as a branding name, and is't actually connected to the computer application in any way. The windows defender browser protection extension uses Microsoft's "Smartscreen" service to get a list of dangerous sites over the internet. The extension doesn't even need a Windows computer to run, just a compatible browser. Cheers!






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