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Whats going on with MS... :/


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#1 -FireBlazer-

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Posted 13 April 2018 - 05:20 AM

https://mspoweruser.com/microsoft-distances-their-always-connected-pc-initiative-from-windows-10-on-arm-issues/



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#2 rp88

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Posted 14 April 2018 - 03:00 PM

Converting things from x86 based (intel or AMD) chip types to ARM is definitely not easy, generally the only way for software written for x86 to run on ARM chips is to go back to the source code and edit it a bit then recompile for an ARM architecture. In general trying to make x86 software run on ARM in any way makes getting Windows exe software running on linux look utterly trivial, that's what a bother it can be. Now the whole point of a Windows OS is to let people run exe file programs*, x86 based exe file programs, many of which do not have available source code and many of which are legacy and no longer in development and for which the source code is not only not publically available but is probably lost forever. Emulating x86 on ARM can get around this but it too is tricky, and quite slow compared to programs running without emulation.

No wonder Ms's project to put Windows 10 on ARM is struggling. ARM chips can do really great things but they are so different from x86 at the very lowest level than going between the two is a total nightmare.

*this is the case in the real world, not however in microsoft's dream world where they become a fashion brand and set up a walled garden of M$ products which no-one in their right mind would actually want. In such a dream world a Windows OS exists to take a user to a magic cloud where all the cool people hang out and have their data sold to advertisers and not to run useful programs.

Edited by rp88, 14 April 2018 - 03:03 PM.

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#3 dhagerjohns

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Posted 15 April 2018 - 11:14 AM

*this is the case in the real world, not however in microsoft's dream world where they become a fashion brand and set up a walled garden of M$ products which no-one in their right mind would actually want. In such a dream world a Windows OS exists to take a user to a magic cloud where all the cool people hang out and have their data sold to advertisers and not to run useful programs.

If you don't like MS, then use another OS, but don't spread stuff you make up off the top of your head.  There are too many conspiracy theories out there already.



#4 DKat20

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Posted 26 April 2018 - 06:27 PM

Could I ask what exactly an Arm Chip is. I have a RaspPi and I still dont know?

#5 DKat20

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Posted 26 April 2018 - 06:30 PM

Hagar the funny thing is I think Apple is leaning that way!

#6 rp88

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Posted 05 May 2018 - 03:43 PM

Post #4: ARM is an architecture of CPU, a competitor to the x86 architecture on which intel and AMD processors are built. These differences exist at a very low level, different instruction sets (little pieces of low level binary code to do the fundamental tasks of computing which involve shifting bits of data in and out of registers and stacks)are used in each architecture. When a programmer writes code they are writing source code, they compile* this source code to make an executable. The compiler converts human readable code to instructions for the CPU, and how it does this conversion varies according to the CPU which the compiler is designed to make software for. Not only must software be compiled differently for x86 versus ARM but also it often needs any libraries or prerequisites on which it relies to be recompiled and sometimes bits of the source code might need editing in the odd case. Compiling code can become quite a tricky task if not done exactly as it was originally designed to be compiled, and when changing from an original architecture for which code was written to a new one on which you now want to run code (for example microsoft converting their operating system that they developed for x86 computers, but now want to try on ARM) it won't be possible to compile it exactly the same way. From what I hear apple might have more chance of working on ARM than ms does, because I think that a lot of mac software is generally distributed as something a little higher level than an executable so can survive the change of CPU architecture rather better. *for simplicity I'm only talking about compiled languages like C rather than interpreted like python. Most software is distributed as an executable of some form, that is to say as code that has already been compiled before the user downloads it. Even with open source software most users just download the executables rather than try to compile the source code themselves. Note how x86 linux executable software won't run on your raspberry pi but will on a linux laptop/desktop, but the same piece of python code can generally run on both as long as it doesn't have to call special libraries which might want to get at low level stuff.
Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB




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