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Suggestion for Antivirus


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#1 monker

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Posted 12 April 2018 - 08:29 AM

I am using windows 10 (64 bit OS) currently up to date on a HP 6200 MT and wanted any suggestions on the best Antivirus Protection and Malware Protection available to date. I used to use Nod32 years ago but I see it is ranked lower than others these days. I have free AVG, MalwareBytes and Ccleaner. I feel they are giving me false flags in an effort to get me to purchase them but I am not sure. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

 

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#2 mikey11

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Posted 12 April 2018 - 08:34 AM

Windows Defender



#3 britechguy

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Posted 12 April 2018 - 08:47 AM

Windows Defender

 

Seconded.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

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#4 Cyberluddite

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Posted 12 April 2018 - 10:12 AM

Windows Defender's good, except if the malware has the same name as the targeted DLL (HitmanPro's been seeing more of those over the past year) or is a bootdisk virus.  For grandma, however, it's perfect.

 

ESET's pretty solid.

 

Avira's built with German engineering but is equally heavy on processing power.  Also, the installation and license activation process isn't very intuitive.  If you're running a network, this might be an effective choice.

 

Norton is being phased out of existence, as Google downgraded Symantec to subCA status last year for selling corrupted SSL certs.

 

Avast and AVG are notorious for false positives, even more so for doing it to each other on a regular basis.

 

McAfee is okay, but it's pre-installed on Windows 10 as an opt-in antivirus.  It doesn't really matter if you opt-out, though, the next update forces the activation.

 

Zemana's awesome, but you have to remember to use its built-in uninstaller or else you'll end up with orphaned kernel files that are a headache to remove.

 

Kaspersky's safe, and also reliable.

 

I ended up going with Dr.Web about a month ago.  So far everything's been running smoothly, I haven't been hit from all sides by malware, and the system maintenance is much easier.

 

NOTES:

 

CCleaner is a maintenance program; it's not really an antivirus, but it's still effective at optimizing your computer.

 

RogueKiller, MalwareBytes, HitmanPro and HitmanPro.Alert are second-opinion scanners, which means that they catch whatever Windows Defender, BitDefender, ESET, Kaspersky, AVG, etc. miss.  It never hurts to have a backup.

 

All major AV software these days utilizes some form of cloud-based upload scanning, in case they detect an unfamiliar file that may (or may not) be a virus; that's how these companies manage "real-time protection".  Nobody got hacked by Kaspersky, the NSA contractor didn't follow the regulations he agreed to... specifically the part involving "don't take NSA tech out of the NSA facility, for any reason."



#5 monker

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Posted 12 April 2018 - 01:15 PM

Thank you 

Cyberluddite very informing
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#6 britechguy

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Posted 12 April 2018 - 01:43 PM



Windows Defender's good, except if the malware has the same name as the targeted DLL (HitmanPro's been seeing more of those over the past year) or is a bootdisk virus.  For grandma, however, it's perfect.

 

It's perfect for way more than Grandma.

 

Every time the question of which antivirus is "the best" comes up I post the following:   The best predictor of whether or not you will get an infection with a virus or any malware is your own history of having done so.  If you are getting repeated infections then you need to improve your browsing and downloading practices.  Virtually no "bad stuff" of any variety sneaks on to a computer, but most is generally the result of direct user action.

 

Our own Quietman7  has written extensively on the subject of security.  The following are three "must reads:"
 
 
 

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#7 quietman7

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Posted 12 April 2018 - 03:41 PM

I no longer recommend AVG as a free alternative anti-virus solution...I explain why in this topic.
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#8 Cyberluddite

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Posted 12 April 2018 - 04:34 PM

It's perfect for way more than Grandma.

 

Every time the question of which antivirus is "the best" comes up I post the following:   The best predictor of whether or not you will get an infection with a virus or any malware is your own history of having done so.  If you are getting repeated infections then you need to improve your browsing and downloading practices.  Virtually no "bad stuff" of any variety sneaks on to a computer, but most is generally the result of direct user action.

 

 

 

I agree, it is the best predictor.  Improving my browsing and downloading, as recommended, eventually required something a bit more advanced.  Did Windows Defender fail as an AV product?  Absolutely not, it was an effective teaching tool at the time and I'd highly recommend it for users who do normal, everyday stuff on the web.

 

Quietman7 has a valid point.  It just depends on what you're planning to do.  And I tend to break stuff.


It's perfect for way more than Grandma.

 

Every time the question of which antivirus is "the best" comes up I post the following:   The best predictor of whether or not you will get an infection with a virus or any malware is your own history of having done so.  If you are getting repeated infections then you need to improve your browsing and downloading practices.  Virtually no "bad stuff" of any variety sneaks on to a computer, but most is generally the result of direct user action.

 

 

 

I agree, it is the best predictor.  Improving my browsing and downloading, as recommended, eventually required something a bit more advanced.  Did Windows Defender fail as an AV product?  Absolutely not, it was an effective teaching tool at the time and I'd highly recommend it for users who do normal, everyday stuff on the web.

 

Quietman7 has a valid point.  It just depends on what you're planning to do.  And I tend to break stuff.



#9 Cyberluddite

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Posted 12 April 2018 - 04:37 PM

Sorry about that double-post.  The screen didn't refresh.  My bad.



#10 quietman7

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Posted 12 April 2018 - 05:26 PM

Not a problem...it happens to me sometimes too.
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#11 STS-1

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Posted 12 April 2018 - 10:53 PM

I am going to weigh in on the opposite side..... In my opinion, with free anti-virus programs you get what you pay for... I have seen Windows Defender miss stuff before, while picked up by other AV programs,  myself I use and recommend Bitdefender (Paid) in conjunction with Malwarebytes Premium(paid) and have never (knock on wood) had any problems with viruses or malware. The one thing I will agree with is that  safe user habits are #1 in protecting yourself!



#12 STS-1

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Posted 12 April 2018 - 11:00 PM

@quiteman7: As a Microsoft guy (just noticed your Microsoft certs) I would love to hear your opinion on Windows Defender now ( I just don't associate "Windows" with anything security conscientious including producing a top quality Anti-virus product... would you consider it on the same level as Paid version of a established AV company such as Bitdefender or Kaspersky (which I personally am not a fan of, but they have a well know rep for being very good)



#13 quietman7

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Posted 13 April 2018 - 04:51 AM

For anti-virus, if you don't mind paying, I generally recommend ESET NOD32 Anti-Virus or Emsisoft Anti-Malware as they are effective and offer excellent protection against ransomware but leave a small footprint...meaning they are not intrusive and do not utilize a lot of system resources which slow down performance. Kaspersky Anti-virus is also a good choice for the same reason.

See my comments in Choosing an Anti-Virus Program for more specific details as to why I recommend ESET and Emsisoft.

Windows 10 Defender (Windows Defender Antivirus) is just as good as any other free antivirus solution (and probably easier to use for the novice) without bundled toolbars or nagging popups. Windows Defender includes Exploit Guard which has four components of new intrusion prevention capabilities designed to lock down a system against various attack vectors and block behaviors commonly used in ransomware attacks before any damage can be done. "Controlled Folder Access" Anti-Ransomware is a feature that allows you to protect files in certain folders to that they cannot be modified by unknown applications. This protects the files within these folders from being encrypted by a ransomware infection. In Windows 10 Spring Creators Update, Microsoft has added a dedicated Ransomware Protection section in the Windows Defender Security Center under the "Virus & threat protection" settings. Windows 10 Anniversary update introduced Limited Periodic Scanning which allows you to also use a third party anti-virus program as your primary protection.

For more specific information about Windows Defender, see my comments in Choosing an Anti-Virus Program.

If you choose to use Windows Defender (or any other anti-virus), then I recommend adding an additional anti-malware solution. Please read Supplementing your Anti-Virus Program with Anti-Malware Tools for information about trustworthy and effective anti-malware programs which can find and remove adware, spyware, browser hijackers and potentially unwanted programs.


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#14 mikey11

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Posted 13 April 2018 - 07:07 AM

 I have seen Windows Defender miss stuff before, while picked up by other AV programs

 

 

those other AV programs are probably giving false positives which most 3rd party AV are known for.....

 

it makes people think they are doing something, when really they are not,

 

so windows defender probably didn't miss anything at all



#15 britechguy

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Posted 13 April 2018 - 09:09 AM

Every antivirus/security suite program ever produced has had incidents of false positives and false negatives.   I won't try to make the claim that "they're all exactly the same" in terms of how many of each they're likely to produce, as some are very well known for producing false positives and I know of none that are known for producing false negatives with any frequency.

 

It is long past time that people realize that antivirus and security suite programs, while essential, are there to "clean up after the mess you've made."  Ideally, and it's not an ideal that's hard to achieve, your antivirus and antimalware programs should never detect anything other than PUPs, if that.  These programs are second lines of defense.  The user having reasonable circumspection about where they're willing to travel in and what they're willing to download from cyberspace is the first line.  It's also important to remember that anything, and I do mean anything, other than your chosen antivirus/antimalware that might pop-up claiming, "You're infected, run {insert some clickable item here}!!," is never, ever, ever to be responded to in the affirmative.  If they can be closed via the "X in the upper right hand corner" then close 'em and if not gracefully shut down your system (or hard shut down if absolutely necessary) and reboot.   The only warnings you trust are from the products that you know that you have consciously chosen to protect your system.  All others are infection vectors.


Edited by britechguy, 13 April 2018 - 09:16 AM.

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 





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