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Windows 10 Spring Creators Update delayed after Microsoft finds 'blocking bug'


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#1 JohnC_21

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Posted 11 April 2018 - 04:38 PM

Details of the nature of the problem are still withheld. We asked for more information on Tuesday morning and once again their poor put-upon PR team had to come back to us at the end of the day saying that they would get back to us when they could.

In other words, Microsoft had told them to say nothing, which for a corporation that has made repeated claims that it was going to be 'more open' is ridiculous and goes some way to explaining why we don't bother waiting for comment from them anymore - we'd never get anything done.

We've been referring to this update as the "Spring Creators Update" in lieu of anything official, but it does seem that even this is still open to debate, which is odd within itself.

Right now, it looks like we probably won't see a rollout in the stable channel for another couple of weeks, so you'll have to hang on until then, and then for the several weeks or months, it usually takes to roll out completely.

https://www.theinquirer.net/inquirer/news/3030004/microsoft-delays-windows-10-spring-creators-update-after-finding-blocking-bug



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#2 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 13 April 2018 - 05:56 AM

I have been running version 1803 build17133 since last month with no problems. I did a clean install as a non-insider but this build seems fast and stable.


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#3 Mastmunda

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Posted 13 April 2018 - 07:00 AM

I am also running version 1803 build17133. No problem.



#4 britechguy

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Posted 13 April 2018 - 08:56 AM

Microsoft's own statement says that the bug is not common, but for those for whom it occurs is "dead in the water" devastating.  I'm really glad that they're delaying release when these sorts of things come to light and/or stopping ongoing roll out when something is detected "in the wild" that's of this nature that was not seen in their testing.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

     Presenting the willfully ignorant with facts is the very definition of casting pearls before swine.

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#5 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 13 April 2018 - 10:59 AM

I agree with you Brian, this is absolutely the right thing for Microsoft to do.


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#6 midimusicman79

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Posted 14 April 2018 - 08:44 AM

Hi all!

 

Since Microsoft did not yet provide any details on the 'blocking bug' issue, hopefully, they will do that when launching the Spring Creators Update at any time now.

 

Personally, I have already bookmarked the Microsoft Windows 10 Update Page so it is easy to check whenever the said update is launched and to download it for installation.

 

After several clean installations of new major Windows 10 versions with the Media Creation Tool and DVDs, and spending a lot of time on re-installing programs for various reasons, I have since the Fall Creators Update performed in-place upgrades.

 

And, as the above-mentioned article points out: "By performing an in-place upgrade, you will clean up the system which may help resolve some troubles with the system."

 

Which, for me personally, possibly means correcting an issue with Taskbar apps icons randomly disappearing upon on Windows 10 booting, which BTW is a known issue with the Fall Creators Update (I have tried all sorts of methods, even PowerShell, but none of them actually resolved that issue).

 

Regards,

midimusicman79


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#7 britechguy

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Posted 14 April 2018 - 09:04 AM

midimusicman,

 

           I always advise doing an in-place upgrade, whether via the normal Windows Update [my first choice, wait until it shows up for your cohort], the Update Assistant on the Win10 Download Page, or creating media and using the "Keep files and apps" choice available when doing a feature update using that media.

 

           The in-place updates replace so much of the existing OS that it's very close to doing a clean install.  Very often any issues that were being seen just disappear after an in-place update.  If they don't, then I move on to a Reset/Refresh and if that's not enough a completely clean install.

 

           The amount of time it takes to get all the software that many people use reinstalled and reconfigured is not trivial.  It should be avoided when that is possible.

 

           I doubt that Microsoft is ever going to discuss what the "blocking bug" was.  It's not really relevant if it's fixed before roll out, at least to end users.  I'm just glad they identified it before roll out to the public began.  The last time something like this happened was Version 1703, I think, and the issues were not identified until roll out to the early cohorts had taken place.  That's far more damaging to the end user and to Microsoft than to delay a release.


Edited by britechguy, 14 April 2018 - 09:07 AM.

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

     Presenting the willfully ignorant with facts is the very definition of casting pearls before swine.

             ~ Brian Vogel

 

 

 

              

 


#8 midimusicman79

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Posted 14 April 2018 - 11:16 AM

Hi again, britechguy!

Thank you for the prompt and insightful reply! :)

Yes, of course I choose the "Keep files and apps" option when I create installation media.

And like you, I do not think Microsoft will discuss the 'blocking bug' either, but I just thought they would mention it in the update's release notes, however, it is certainly no requirement, and moreover, I do agree with you that they did the right thing.

Thank you! :)

Regards,
midimusicman79

Edited by midimusicman79, 14 April 2018 - 11:18 AM.

MS Win 10 Pro 64-bit, EAM Pro/EEK, MB 3 Free, WPP, SWB Free, CryptoPrevent Free, NVT OSA and Unchecky, WFW, FFQ with CanDef, uBO, Ghostery, Grammarly Free and HTTPS Ew. Acronis TI 2018, K. Sw. Upd. AM-tools: 9-lab RT BETA, AdwCleaner, Auslogics AM, aswMBR, Avira PCC, BD ART, catchme, Cezurity AV, CCE, CKS, ClamWin P., Crystal Sec., DDS, DWCI, EMCO MD, eScan MWAV, ESS/EOS, FGP, FMTB, FRST, F-SOS, FSS, FreeFixer, GMP, GMER, hP BETA, HJT, Inherit, JRT, K. avz4, KVRT, K. TDSSKiller, LSP-Fix, MB 3 Free, MBAR BETA, MA Stinger, NMC, NoBot, NPE, NSS, NVT MRF (NMRF), OTL, PCC, QD, RCS, RSIT, RKill, Rs, SC, SR, SAP, SVRT, SAS, SL, TMHC, TSA ART, UHM, Vba32 AR, VRS, WR (AiO), Xvirus PG, ZAM, ZHPC, ZHPD and Zoek. I have 23 Years of PC Experience. Bold = effective.


#9 JohnC_21

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Posted 14 April 2018 - 11:32 AM

What surprises me is this was not caught in the fast ring but was caught just before release. Even though it may be a rare bug it seems somebody in the fast ring would have seen it. Even though Microsoft isn't required to say what the bug is I wish Microsoft would be transparent about it. What's there to hide? I am afraid to say with Windows as a Service getting two major releases a year you are going to be see more of this. 



#10 britechguy

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Posted 14 April 2018 - 12:07 PM

I am afraid to say with Windows as a Service getting two major releases a year you are going to be see more of this. 

 

I agree, but probably not for the same reasons.

 

There are untold millions of machines never designed for Windows 10 and never certified by their makers for upgrade to Windows 10 that are, indeed, running Windows 10.  I have one of them (and had two, but there was no mousepad driver for the Inspiron 1720 laptop that ever worked, so it's now Linux Mint and "in dry dock.").

 

There is no way that Microsoft could ever encounter all possible issues in their testing given the number of platforms that have Windows 10 on them, many of which are "old" hardware.

 

John, do you happen to actually know how/where it was caught?  I haven't even seen anything that specific.  The only thing I know is that for those very few souls for whom the bug reared its ugly head it must have been devastating.  There's no way this latest feature update would have been delayed, and the delay announced publicly, were that not the case.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

     Presenting the willfully ignorant with facts is the very definition of casting pearls before swine.

             ~ Brian Vogel

 

 

 

              

 


#11 JohnC_21

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Posted 14 April 2018 - 12:35 PM

No,  I don't know how it was caught. I was actually thinking people who installed it early like Rocky found the bug and reported it to Microsoft but if that was the case I can't understand why it's not public knowledge what the bug is. 

 

There are untold millions of machines never designed for Windows 10 and never certified by their makers for upgrade to Windows 10 that are, indeed, running Windows 10.  I have one of them (and had two, but there was no mousepad driver for the Inspiron 1720 laptop that ever worked, so it's now Linux Mint and "in dry dock.").

And yet Microsoft installed Windows 10 on these older computer's via GWX and encouraged people to upgrade but I can see why they did it. 


Edited by JohnC_21, 14 April 2018 - 12:35 PM.


#12 britechguy

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Posted 14 April 2018 - 01:22 PM

John,

 

           Ignoring GWX (which, at the time, I didn't, but you could decline with the exception of the "sneaky week" where hitting the red X was taken as implied consent) most of the folks I know who upgraded their machines would have done so via other means had GWX not invited them to do it.

 

           It actually amazes me how well Windows 10 runs on all kinds of hardware it was never envisioned to be running on.

 

           I can see why Microsoft pushed Windows 10, too.  The fact of the matter is that anyone who intends to stay within the Windows ecosystem is going to have to transition to Windows 10, even if that involves buying new hardware [and for machines issued during the pre-Windows 7 era I really have very little sympathy.  You can buy ultra cheap machines that run rings around those computers for less than $200.  Machines have a finite expected service life, even if I push mine past it on a routine basis].   They do not want to be maintaining three major releases of Windows for one moment longer than they committed to, and I can understand that entirely.

 

           I long ago accepted that I am at the mercy of the hardware and software (including OS) makers as far as what my choices are.  It's no different than being at the mercy of car makers for car choices, home electronics makers for the full range of electronic devices, etc., etc., etc.   The world is not being designed around me:  never has and never will be.  I am required to make choices, particularly at major transition points for anything.  It's just a standard part of living.

 

           I have nothing against people expressing their opinions about what they like or dislike, but I find that I am much relieved now that the insane (and often inane) ranting that took place about Windows 10 in the early days is subsiding for the most part.  If you don't like Microsoft or Windows 10 you (the generic you, not you personally) are faced with researching what else is out there, how it compares on more than just surface gloss, and to make an informed decision about how you wish to proceed.  Any OS is designed with myriad competing needs and wants based on the various user demographics.  OSes are metaphorical Swiss Army knives and while they may each do a wide number of things very well in the eyes of a given user or user group they invariably do lots of other things suboptimally in those same eyes.  'Twas ever thus.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

     Presenting the willfully ignorant with facts is the very definition of casting pearls before swine.

             ~ Brian Vogel

 

 

 

              

 


#13 rp88

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Posted 14 April 2018 - 02:52 PM

Post #12, " most of the folks I know who upgraded their machines would have done so via other means had GWX not invited them to do it."

I'm not so sure about that. If we ignore the periods in which GWX.exe was used to forcibly upgrade users without consent and concentrate solely on the times when it was merely acting as adware rather than full malware then I still think it is responsible for a lot of the people running windows 10, especially on the older and lower performance hardware. What we must remember is that non-geeky people don't read tech news websites, nor do they hear about announcements of products and demonstrations made my tech companies. These people might well have only been aware of Windows 10 due to the GWX adware telling them. They might also have upgraded without really realising what they were doing, merely thinking it was an update. Given that the sort of people who don't keep up with computing news, click through pop-ups without really being aware of their effects and don't typically understand the full meaning of phrases like "change operating system" are also the sort of people who are likely to be running older lower powered hardware we could very much say that if M$ had not made GWX at all (that is not even the early phase adware, and definitely not the malicious version they deployed later) then there would probably be a lot less people today suffering Windows 10 on hardware that wasn't really meant to run it. If not for the GWX virus then the machines on which Windows 10 updates are most likely to cause issues would probably still be running their prior operating systems.


All that said:
1. Very good to see microsoft delaying an update because of a discovered bug in it, I can only commend them for thinking about quality above of the marketing PR of meeting a deadline.

2."OSes are metaphorical Swiss Army knives and while they may each do a wide number of things very well in the eyes of a given user or user group they invariably do lots of other things suboptimally in those same eyes. 'Twas ever thus." I quite agree.

Edited by rp88, 14 April 2018 - 02:53 PM.

Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB

#14 midimusicman79

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Posted 15 April 2018 - 11:05 AM

Hi again, all!

Although it merely is a theory, below the said news article, there is a comment by a user named m-slovak79, who wonders if the 'blocking bug' possibly could be the (IVT) Intel Virtualization Technology bug, but I am not sure, as it could be wrong. She has some relatively good arguments, though, and as such, I wish I could quote her, but given her use of some explicit language, I cannot, as that would violate the Forum Rules.

However, as it happens, the only way I personally can access the news article's comments section, is from my smartphone (the only plausible reason for this could likely be Ghostery, as I know it blocks comments by default).

Also, with all due respect, I am wondering how some BC users and even non-insiders can claim to already be running the Spring Creators Update Version 1803, even though, AFAIK, it never was officially launched?

Thank you! :)

Regards,
midimusicman79

Edited by midimusicman79, 16 April 2018 - 06:54 AM.

MS Win 10 Pro 64-bit, EAM Pro/EEK, MB 3 Free, WPP, SWB Free, CryptoPrevent Free, NVT OSA and Unchecky, WFW, FFQ with CanDef, uBO, Ghostery, Grammarly Free and HTTPS Ew. Acronis TI 2018, K. Sw. Upd. AM-tools: 9-lab RT BETA, AdwCleaner, Auslogics AM, aswMBR, Avira PCC, BD ART, catchme, Cezurity AV, CCE, CKS, ClamWin P., Crystal Sec., DDS, DWCI, EMCO MD, eScan MWAV, ESS/EOS, FGP, FMTB, FRST, F-SOS, FSS, FreeFixer, GMP, GMER, hP BETA, HJT, Inherit, JRT, K. avz4, KVRT, K. TDSSKiller, LSP-Fix, MB 3 Free, MBAR BETA, MA Stinger, NMC, NoBot, NPE, NSS, NVT MRF (NMRF), OTL, PCC, QD, RCS, RSIT, RKill, Rs, SC, SR, SAP, SVRT, SAS, SL, TMHC, TSA ART, UHM, Vba32 AR, VRS, WR (AiO), Xvirus PG, ZAM, ZHPC, ZHPD and Zoek. I have 23 Years of PC Experience. Bold = effective.


#15 JohnC_21

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Posted 15 April 2018 - 11:09 AM

It was available via the insider program. Also, you could cheat if you were not an insider.

 

https://www.techradar.com/how-to/how-to-download-and-install-the-windows-10-spring-creators-update-right-now






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