Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Why two scan options?


  • Please log in to reply
18 replies to this topic

#1 MickinPlymouthUK

MickinPlymouthUK

  • Members
  • 664 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:09:38 AM

Posted 06 April 2018 - 07:12 AM

Hi, PC dummy here, I've got AVG payware and when I click "Scan now" it only takes less than a couple of minutes before the "No threats found" message comes up.

But there's also a "Deep Scan" option which takes an hour or more before  "No threats" comes up.

So why don't I simply use 'Scan now' every time? Why should I ever want to consider using 'Deep scan'?


Edited by MickinPlymouthUK, 06 April 2018 - 07:15 AM.


BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 mikey11

mikey11

  • Members
  • 1,209 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Psychiatric Ward @ Beelitz-Heilstatten Hospital, Beelitz, Germany
  • Local time:10:38 AM

Posted 06 April 2018 - 07:18 AM

deep scan probably scans your entire drive,

 

scan now only scans the parts where viruses are most commonly found



#3 Platypus

Platypus

  • Moderator
  • 13,731 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Australia
  • Local time:06:38 PM

Posted 06 April 2018 - 07:23 AM

San now doesn't say you are threat-free, it says no threats were found - where it looked.

 

A basic scan looks for any evidence of malware being active currently, and scans for signs of malware on the system in locations that it's very likely malware would be found.

 

If nothing is found, then there's reason to believe there's not active malware currently on the system.

 

A Deep scan will, as mikey11 says, scan everything on the system, most likely including things like zipped archives if possible, so will take a long time, and if something undesirable is found, it will probably not be something that would be an immediate threat.


Top 5 things that never get done:

1.


#4 britechguy

britechguy

    Been there, done that, got the T-shirt


  • Moderator
  • 6,883 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Staunton, VA
  • Local time:04:38 AM

Posted 06 April 2018 - 08:16 AM

Also, some products make a deep scan (or whatever they call it) of the entire drive as their first scan after installation and make a record of what's been scanned and the date/time stamps on same.  Subsequent scans ("Quick scans") only look at the common areas where new infections are likely to be found and any new files or changed files.

 

It doesn't take much space to index the files scanned during a deep scan and their last modified information.  That can be used to rule in or rule out a follow-up scan for a given file/folder on subsequent quick scans.

 

I can't recall the last time I've done a "deep scan" or equivalent on any of my systems since at least some of the products I use (or have used) create a whitelist that they refer to on subsequent quick scans to determine whether or not a rescan of actual content is necessary.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (my website address is in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

    Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
             ~ Lauren Bacall
              

 


#5 midimusicman79

midimusicman79

  • Members
  • 541 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Norway
  • Local time:10:38 AM

Posted 06 April 2018 - 11:24 AM

Hi, MickinPlymouthUK!

For routine checking, only the "Scan now" option is necessary, but the "Deep Scan" option is only necessary if your system is heavily infected with malware (showing obvious signs of infection/malware symptoms, which BTW is rather unlikely if you follow best practices of safe computing), but anyway, if your system is clean of malware, you seldomly need to use it.

The credit for the above-mentioned information goes to quietman7.

Regards,
midimusicman79

Edited by midimusicman79, 06 April 2018 - 03:45 PM.

MS Win 10 Pro 64-bit, EAM Pro/EEK, MB 3 Free, WPP, SWB Free, CryptoPrevent Free and Unchecky, WFW, FFQ with uBO, Ghostery, Grammarly Free and HTTPS Ew. Acronis TI 2018, K. Sw. Upd. AM-tools: 9-lab RT BETA, AdwCleaner, Auslogics AM, aswMBR, Avira PCC, BD ART, catchme, Cezurity AV, CCE, CKS, ClamWin P., Crystal Sec., DDS, DWCI, EMCO MD, eScan MWAV, ESS/EOS, FGP, FMTB, FRST, F-SOS, FSS, FreeFixer, GMP, GMER, hP BETA, HJT, Inherit, JRT, K. avz4, KVRT, K. TDSSKiller, LSP-Fix, MB 3 Free, MBAR BETA, MA Stinger, NMC, NoBot, NPE, NSS, NVT MRF (NMRF), OTL, PCC, QD, RCS, RSIT, RKill, Rs, SC, SR, SAP, SVRT, SAS, SL, TMHC, TSA ART, UHM, Vba32 AR, VRS, WR (AiO), Xvirus PG, ZAM, ZHPC, ZHPD and Zoek. I have 23 Years of PC Experience. Bold = effective.


#6 quietman7

quietman7

    Bleepin' Janitor


  • Global Moderator
  • 50,964 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Virginia, USA
  • Local time:04:38 AM

Posted 06 April 2018 - 05:48 PM

A Full (Deep) Scan is much more comprehensive since it scans the entire hard drive (all folders/files) which can number in the thousands to hundreds of thousands. Some may even scan all registry entries which too can number in the thousands. The length of time for performing a Full (Deep) Scan will vary but because it is so comprehensive, this type of scan can take several hours.

BTW, some scanners also offer a Custom Scan which allows the user to select any files and folders on the hard drive to be scanned.
.
.
Windows Insider MVP 2017-2018
Microsoft MVP Reconnect 2016
Microsoft MVP Consumer Security 2007-2015 kO7xOZh.gif
Member of UNITE, Unified Network of Instructors and Trusted Eliminators

If I have been helpful & you'd like to consider a donation, click 38WxTfO.gif

#7 MickinPlymouthUK

MickinPlymouthUK
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 664 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:09:38 AM

Posted 07 April 2018 - 12:33 AM

Thanks guys, so I think I'll run the quick scan several times a week because it's so quick, and I'll let the Deep scan run when I'm away from the computer for a few hours watching a film on TV about once a week, does that sound a sensible strategy to you?

What are your own strategies?



#8 midimusicman79

midimusicman79

  • Members
  • 541 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Norway
  • Local time:10:38 AM

Posted 07 April 2018 - 03:10 AM

Hi again, MickinPlymouthUK!

Yes, if you practice safe computing, that should be more than adequate.

Personally, I run quick scans every now and then with my Emsisoft Anti-Malware, and occasionally Malwarebytes Free.

Other members may have other and better strategies.

Good luck! :)

Regards,
midimusicman79

Edited by midimusicman79, 07 April 2018 - 06:47 AM.

MS Win 10 Pro 64-bit, EAM Pro/EEK, MB 3 Free, WPP, SWB Free, CryptoPrevent Free and Unchecky, WFW, FFQ with uBO, Ghostery, Grammarly Free and HTTPS Ew. Acronis TI 2018, K. Sw. Upd. AM-tools: 9-lab RT BETA, AdwCleaner, Auslogics AM, aswMBR, Avira PCC, BD ART, catchme, Cezurity AV, CCE, CKS, ClamWin P., Crystal Sec., DDS, DWCI, EMCO MD, eScan MWAV, ESS/EOS, FGP, FMTB, FRST, F-SOS, FSS, FreeFixer, GMP, GMER, hP BETA, HJT, Inherit, JRT, K. avz4, KVRT, K. TDSSKiller, LSP-Fix, MB 3 Free, MBAR BETA, MA Stinger, NMC, NoBot, NPE, NSS, NVT MRF (NMRF), OTL, PCC, QD, RCS, RSIT, RKill, Rs, SC, SR, SAP, SVRT, SAS, SL, TMHC, TSA ART, UHM, Vba32 AR, VRS, WR (AiO), Xvirus PG, ZAM, ZHPC, ZHPD and Zoek. I have 23 Years of PC Experience. Bold = effective.


#9 quietman7

quietman7

    Bleepin' Janitor


  • Global Moderator
  • 50,964 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Virginia, USA
  • Local time:04:38 AM

Posted 07 April 2018 - 06:49 AM

As already noted...a Full (Deep) Scan is generally only recommended for heavily infected systems...showing obvious indications (signs of infection and malware symptoms) that something is wrong. In most cases when performing routine security checks, only a Quick Scan is needed.


.
.
Windows Insider MVP 2017-2018
Microsoft MVP Reconnect 2016
Microsoft MVP Consumer Security 2007-2015 kO7xOZh.gif
Member of UNITE, Unified Network of Instructors and Trusted Eliminators

If I have been helpful & you'd like to consider a donation, click 38WxTfO.gif

#10 mikey11

mikey11

  • Members
  • 1,209 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Psychiatric Ward @ Beelitz-Heilstatten Hospital, Beelitz, Germany
  • Local time:10:38 AM

Posted 07 April 2018 - 08:39 AM

Thanks guys, so I think I'll run the quick scan several times a week because it's so quick, and I'll let the Deep scan run when I'm away from the computer for a few hours watching a film on TV about once a week, does that sound a sensible strategy to you?

What are your own strategies?

 

 

its fine, however in my opinion its overkill,

 

generally the quick scan is sufficient......i only do a full scan about once or twice a year



#11 britechguy

britechguy

    Been there, done that, got the T-shirt


  • Moderator
  • 6,883 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Staunton, VA
  • Local time:04:38 AM

Posted 07 April 2018 - 09:49 AM

I don't even see why one would manually trigger a Quick Scan absent some suspicion of a very recent infection.   The vast majority of modern antivirus and security suites do these automatically, without any user intervention, on a basis considered "routine enough" to catch anything.

 

This is all the more true since most modern antivirus/security software has realtime scanning upon download, which should catch anything that even could infect a system and quarantine it immediately, not allowing it to be saved for regular access by the end user.

 

Anything "could miss something" but those occurrences these days are increasingly rare and have been very rare for years now.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (my website address is in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

    Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
             ~ Lauren Bacall
              

 


#12 mikey11

mikey11

  • Members
  • 1,209 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Psychiatric Ward @ Beelitz-Heilstatten Hospital, Beelitz, Germany
  • Local time:10:38 AM

Posted 07 April 2018 - 10:30 AM

I don't even see why one would manually trigger a Quick Scan absent some suspicion of a very recent infection.   The vast majority of modern antivirus and security suites do these automatically, without any user intervention

 

 

OP is using AVG.....i havn't used AVG in a few years but back when i did use it, it would not do automatic scans unless that option was setup by the user.....you could select a specific day of the week, and a specific time for the automatic scan, but this was disabled by default.....maybe they have changed that now, im not sure,

 

i moved on a few years ago to windows defender and have never looked back.....no more annoying AVG popups for me



#13 midimusicman79

midimusicman79

  • Members
  • 541 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Norway
  • Local time:10:38 AM

Posted 07 April 2018 - 10:47 AM

Hi, britechguy!

I don't even see why one would manually trigger a Quick Scan absent some suspicion of a very recent infection. The vast majority of modern antivirus and security suites do these automatically, without any user intervention, on a basis considered "routine enough" to catch anything.


Interesting. Approximately how often do antivirus and security suites automatically do quick scans, or how often should these scans be scheduled?

Thank you! :)

Regards,
midimusicman79

MS Win 10 Pro 64-bit, EAM Pro/EEK, MB 3 Free, WPP, SWB Free, CryptoPrevent Free and Unchecky, WFW, FFQ with uBO, Ghostery, Grammarly Free and HTTPS Ew. Acronis TI 2018, K. Sw. Upd. AM-tools: 9-lab RT BETA, AdwCleaner, Auslogics AM, aswMBR, Avira PCC, BD ART, catchme, Cezurity AV, CCE, CKS, ClamWin P., Crystal Sec., DDS, DWCI, EMCO MD, eScan MWAV, ESS/EOS, FGP, FMTB, FRST, F-SOS, FSS, FreeFixer, GMP, GMER, hP BETA, HJT, Inherit, JRT, K. avz4, KVRT, K. TDSSKiller, LSP-Fix, MB 3 Free, MBAR BETA, MA Stinger, NMC, NoBot, NPE, NSS, NVT MRF (NMRF), OTL, PCC, QD, RCS, RSIT, RKill, Rs, SC, SR, SAP, SVRT, SAS, SL, TMHC, TSA ART, UHM, Vba32 AR, VRS, WR (AiO), Xvirus PG, ZAM, ZHPC, ZHPD and Zoek. I have 23 Years of PC Experience. Bold = effective.


#14 mikey11

mikey11

  • Members
  • 1,209 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Psychiatric Ward @ Beelitz-Heilstatten Hospital, Beelitz, Germany
  • Local time:10:38 AM

Posted 07 April 2018 - 11:30 AM

 

Interesting. Approximately how often do antivirus and security suites automatically do quick scans,

 

 

 

my windows defender (windows 10) does a quick scan at least once a day....sometimes twice i think, depending on how much i use the computer.....it also updates by itself....one thing i really like about it, is it really takes care of itself, without needing any attention by the user



#15 quietman7

quietman7

    Bleepin' Janitor


  • Global Moderator
  • 50,964 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Virginia, USA
  • Local time:04:38 AM

Posted 07 April 2018 - 03:51 PM

There is no hard and fast or universal rule for how often to perform a scan or what security tools to scan with since such activity varies with each individual. If an anti-virus does not perform automatic daily scans, they typically have advanced settings for startup and/or scheduled scans...daily, weekly, monthly, time of day, etc... by choosing options for Add Task, Add new scan.

BTW...some security scanners may also offer a Context menu scan whereby you can start an on-demand scan of any file by right-clicking on it from the context menu. There may even be a Context menu scan profile option which allows defining a scan configuration that will be used when you trigger the scan this manner.
.
.
Windows Insider MVP 2017-2018
Microsoft MVP Reconnect 2016
Microsoft MVP Consumer Security 2007-2015 kO7xOZh.gif
Member of UNITE, Unified Network of Instructors and Trusted Eliminators

If I have been helpful & you'd like to consider a donation, click 38WxTfO.gif




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users