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Question: can an email address give someone your IP address?


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8 replies to this topic

#1 RichardCB

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Posted 04 April 2018 - 05:26 PM

Hello,
I am guessing this question has been asked before, but I was having a discussion about this and we couldnt come to a conclusion.
If this has been already answered, I would appreciate a link to it.

Thanks!
RichardCB

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#2 britechguy

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Posted 04 April 2018 - 09:20 PM

Think about this.

 

You can use the same e-mail address no matter where you are in the world and no matter what network you're connected to while using it.  Does that suggest a one-to-one correspondence between the two?


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#3 Allan

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Posted 05 April 2018 - 06:31 AM

Your IP address is public information. The header of your email will generally contain your IP address. Here's a detailed explanation: https://www.whatismyip.com/how-to-trace-an-e-mail-address/


Edited by Allan, 05 April 2018 - 06:32 AM.


#4 britechguy

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Posted 05 April 2018 - 08:00 AM

Allan,

 

        I love the information presented on that page, particularly:  "After viewing the trace information, the initiating IP can be looked up to determine from where the message was sent. IP address location information DOES NOT contain your street name, house number, or phone number. The trace will most likely determine the city and the ISP the sender used."

 

        Even the city information associated with the ISP the sender used can be, and often is, wildly inaccurate.  Verizon is my ISP, and I'd love to know how they connect me to their DSL offices.  Most of the time I seem to appear to be somewhere down near the Roanoke, Radford, Blacksburg areas but there are occasions where I appear to be elsewhere [in other states on occasion] when I'm sitting in my living room.

 

         That ISP address depends directly on what ISP you happen to be connected to at any given moment when an e-mail is created and sent by you.  It's not personally identifiable in any meaningful sense of the term.  It's an artifact of your internet connection.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#5 Allan

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Posted 05 April 2018 - 08:31 AM

Brian,

 

Agreed - as I have often found with ip-lookup. For my purposes (on other websites where I may want to check user authenticity, duplicate accounts, etc), the general geo area is generally enough. But to respond to the OP's question, the email header DOES generally contain the ip address and our ip addresses are not private or protected (nor should they be).



#6 STS-1

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Posted 06 May 2018 - 02:37 AM

Allan:

 

Just curious about why you would say that, should our IP not be private such as our home phone number or street address? (or are you simply referring to the "public IP address?)

 

Brian,

 

Agreed - as I have often found with ip-lookup. For my purposes (on other websites where I may want to check user authenticity, duplicate accounts, etc), the general geo area is generally enough. But to respond to the OP's question, the email header DOES generally contain the ip address and our ip addresses are not private or protected (nor should they be).

After re reading the entire forum I think you are referring to the public IP address... not an ISP disclosing someone's private IP address...



#7 sflatechguy

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Posted 06 May 2018 - 09:05 AM

Again, there are no private IP addresses. The minute you connect to the Internet, your IP address is "public". It has to be, or web servers wouldn't know where to send HTTP requests from your browser, and mail servers wouldn't know where to route emails sent to you (if you are using a mail client like Outlook or Thunderbird).



#8 britechguy

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Posted 06 May 2018 - 09:20 AM

Again, there are no private IP addresses. The minute you connect to the Internet, your IP address is "public". It has to be, or web servers wouldn't know where to send HTTP requests from your browser, and mail servers wouldn't know where to route emails sent to you (if you are using a mail client like Outlook or Thunderbird).

 

And since this has been the case since cyber time immemorial (eventually there will be such a thing) I fail to understand:

 

1.  Why people won't accept it when it's pointed out.

 

2.  Even care.

 

In real life our own names, addresses, often phone numbers, and all kinds of public records concerning us have been easily accessible for decades now via web searches after being put online.  That isn't a target on one's back, it's just common knowledge being "more common" than it once was.

 

The world is not out to get you.   In fact, most of the world is not concerned in any way about your life or existence.  [And that's for the generic "you," which includes me.]


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#9 RichardCB

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Posted 08 May 2018 - 08:20 PM

Thank you for the link concerning this subject.




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