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Need help upgrading my computer if possible


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#1 Sacrifice

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Posted 28 March 2018 - 11:32 PM

I have a pretty old computer I was told that I can't upgrade the graphics card more than I have or really do much more to make it much faster for playing league of legends just wanted to know if anyone could tell me if that's true if there's anything I can do or if a better option would be to upgrade to building a whole new computer either way if anyone can tell me how to upgrade this one or help me build a new one specifically for playing league of legends or help me understand how to build my own and not get ripped off i'm playing on about 25-30 fps and it uses about 100% of the CPU usage when playing

 

 

 

Here is my computer stats:

Windows 7 Ultimate 64 bit

Compaq Presario RK539AA-ABA SR2173WM

AMD Athlon 64 Processor 3500+, ~2.2GHz 1 Core

3072MB RAM

NVIDIA GeForce 7600 GT

 

Hopefully this is all the information needed i'm not really sure how to find out more detailed information



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#2 jonuk76

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Posted 29 March 2018 - 10:11 AM

League of Legends Recommended Specs:

3 GHz processor
2 GB of RAM (4 GB of RAM for Windows Vista and higher)
12 GB available hard disk space
Nvidia GeForce 8800/AMD Radeon HD 5670 or equivalent video card (Dedicated GPU with 512MB or higher Video Memory(VRAM))
Support for DirectX v9.0c or better.
Windows XP SP3, Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows 8.1, or Windows 10 with the latest service pack installed
The latest update to .NET Framework from Microsoft

 

 

It is an old system (guessing from the spec around a 2006-7 vintage?), and I wouldn't suggest putting any serious expense into upgrading it.  If it can be done for very little money, then you might decide it's worth it.
 
According to the HP Support site, the system will take up to an AMD Athlon 64 X2 5000+ AM2 processor, and will support up to 4 Gb Memory (4 x 1 Gb DDR2 DIMM's).  The GPU (you already have a 7600 GT) is fitted in a PCIe 1.0 x16 slot, which means it is upgradeable.  You have to bear in mind though that the systems weak power supply won't be suitable for powering a lot of cards.
 
You can pick up said Athlon X2 cheaply (around $5).  GPU's, anything worth buying is not going to be so cheap and there's a lot of grossly overpriced used cards out there.  Some of the stuff people want $100 on eBay (like mid range cards from more than 5 years ago) I would realistically pay only $20-30 for.  Something like this GT 630 would probably be OK at $30-ish.
 
Other alternatives include building/buying a new PC, or buying a refurbished older (but newer than the HP) PC.  For building, something like this is about the lowest end I would consider, but it would be a massive upgrade over your existing PC in every way.  If you have a retail Windows 7 license, you can install it on a new system - it does need some tweaks to work properly though.

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#3 Sacrifice

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Posted 29 March 2018 - 03:04 PM

 

League of Legends Recommended Specs:

3 GHz processor
2 GB of RAM (4 GB of RAM for Windows Vista and higher)
12 GB available hard disk space
Nvidia GeForce 8800/AMD Radeon HD 5670 or equivalent video card (Dedicated GPU with 512MB or higher Video Memory(VRAM))
Support for DirectX v9.0c or better.
Windows XP SP3, Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows 8.1, or Windows 10 with the latest service pack installed
The latest update to .NET Framework from Microsoft

 

 

It is an old system (guessing from the spec around a 2006-7 vintage?), and I wouldn't suggest putting any serious expense into upgrading it.  If it can be done for very little money, then you might decide it's worth it.
 
According to the HP Support site, the system will take up to an AMD Athlon 64 X2 5000+ AM2 processor, and will support up to 4 Gb Memory (4 x 1 Gb DDR2 DIMM's).  The GPU (you already have a 7600 GT) is fitted in a PCIe 1.0 x16 slot, which means it is upgradeable.  You have to bear in mind though that the systems weak power supply won't be suitable for powering a lot of cards.
 
You can pick up said Athlon X2 cheaply (around $5).  GPU's, anything worth buying is not going to be so cheap and there's a lot of grossly overpriced used cards out there.  Some of the stuff people want $100 on eBay (like mid range cards from more than 5 years ago) I would realistically pay only $20-30 for.  Something like this GT 630 would probably be OK at $30-ish.
 
Other alternatives include building/buying a new PC, or buying a refurbished older (but newer than the HP) PC.  For building, something like this is about the lowest end I would consider, but it would be a massive upgrade over your existing PC in every way.  If you have a retail Windows 7 license, you can install it on a new system - it does need some tweaks to work properly though.

 

 

Interesting I didn't realize HP was Compaq

 

I am assuming the AMD Athlon X2 doesn't imply two of them but why is it "x2" ?

 

Is there anyway you can explain PCIe 1.0 x16? How do you know what parts can be upgraded with what such as the graphics card ? My friend gave me this computer for free years ago and I believe I spent about 60$ on the 7600 GT and he told me it was about the best I could get for it. How much better is the card you linked? Also you talked about multiple cards were you implying to get linked card as a secondary? The motherboard from what I can tell only has 1 slot for 1 GPU theres 3 slots below it and they are a tiny bit smaller and white instead of black.

 

Thank you for your time



#4 jonuk76

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Posted 29 March 2018 - 04:12 PM

Yep, HP took over Compaq a few years back.

 

The X2 is a dual core CPU.  So basically two complete CPU's in one package.  The one you have is a single core.  These days, most PC's have multi core CPU's - dual core as a minimum, with quad cores + more becoming mainstream.  These CPU's allow the system to multitask better.  Windows is a multi-tasking OS and does a lot of things in the background even if you are only have one program open, so it results in a much smoother and quicker system.  Speed comparison of 3500+ vs X2 5000+ vs Ryzen 3 2200G for info.

 

PCIe (PCI Express) is the type of expansion slot used for the graphics card (actually it links a lot more of the PC's motherboard functions together but that's not relevant really). 1.0 is the version.  PCIE 2.0 became common around 2009, 3.0 some time after that, each time doubling the data rate of the previous version.  Key point though is that the different versions are both backward and forward compatible.  You can plug a PCIe 3.0 card into a PCIe 1.0 motherboard, and it should work (but at the lower speed).  Similarly you can use an older PCIe 1.0 card in a newer PCIe 3.0 motherboard.  The 7600 GT was a good card - 11 years ago.  The GT 630 is also an old card now (2012) and not "high end" by any means.  But it should be OK for that particular game.  I linked to it because it was cheap, and it's roughly 4 times faster than the 7600 GT.  Note, the Vega graphics included in the budget build I linked to (actually they are integrated onto the 2200G CPU), is a lot faster again.  Imperfect comparison here but it gives an idea.

 

I hadn't meant to imply running multiple graphics cards. Yes solutions do exist for using multiple GPU's combined to increase performance (AMD Crossfire, and Nvidia SLI) but not on your system.  Due to various issues though, I think most people would suggest getting one good card rather than using Crossfire or SLI (I know I would). The other expansion slots on your motherboard are PCI.  Used mostly for sound cards, network cards, modem's and in the very old days, graphics cards.  This is now a legacy standard, replaced by PCI Express.


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#5 Sacrifice

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Posted 29 March 2018 - 08:40 PM

Yep, HP took over Compaq a few years back.

 

The X2 is a dual core CPU.  So basically two complete CPU's in one package.  The one you have is a single core.  These days, most PC's have multi core CPU's - dual core as a minimum, with quad cores + more becoming mainstream.  These CPU's allow the system to multitask better.  Windows is a multi-tasking OS and does a lot of things in the background even if you are only have one program open, so it results in a much smoother and quicker system.  Speed comparison of 3500+ vs X2 5000+ vs Ryzen 3 2200G for info.

 

PCIe (PCI Express) is the type of expansion slot used for the graphics card (actually it links a lot more of the PC's motherboard functions together but that's not relevant really). 1.0 is the version.  PCIE 2.0 became common around 2009, 3.0 some time after that, each time doubling the data rate of the previous version.  Key point though is that the different versions are both backward and forward compatible.  You can plug a PCIe 3.0 card into a PCIe 1.0 motherboard, and it should work (but at the lower speed).  Similarly you can use an older PCIe 1.0 card in a newer PCIe 3.0 motherboard.  The 7600 GT was a good card - 11 years ago.  The GT 630 is also an old card now (2012) and not "high end" by any means.  But it should be OK for that particular game.  I linked to it because it was cheap, and it's roughly 4 times faster than the 7600 GT.  Note, the Vega graphics included in the budget build I linked to (actually they are integrated onto the 2200G CPU), is a lot faster again.  Imperfect comparison here but it gives an idea.

 

I hadn't meant to imply running multiple graphics cards. Yes solutions do exist for using multiple GPU's combined to increase performance (AMD Crossfire, and Nvidia SLI) but not on your system.  Due to various issues though, I think most people would suggest getting one good card rather than using Crossfire or SLI (I know I would). The other expansion slots on your motherboard are PCI.  Used mostly for sound cards, network cards, modem's and in the very old days, graphics cards.  This is now a legacy standard, replaced by PCI Express.

Ah I see that would likely be a great improvement for 5$ then considering when running games or most anything it is usually always at 100% CPU Usage right? The AMD Athlon 64 X2 is cheaper in price on the middle graph? 

 

Very interesting. So as a general rule would you say that you can use even a brand new card in an older system such as mine and it would still be better quality than older cards but just not able to function at as high of speeds as it may be capable on a newer motherboard? Is there a way to tell what card is better than what card other than i'm sure websites/web searching.

 

I'm thinking i'll upgrade this pc now for about roughly 50 bucks and then as I can afford it i'll start buying parts to build one of my own plus then I can keep it as a backup. Could you recommend me two ram sticks (I have two 0.5) or does that not matter much what brand you go with?

 

What about CD drives, could I use my old one with a new computer I was building temporarily if I wanted to?

 

Thank you for your time



#6 jonuk76

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Posted 29 March 2018 - 10:46 PM

Ah I see that would likely be a great improvement for 5$ then considering when running games or most anything it is usually always at 100% CPU Usage right? The AMD Athlon 64 X2 is cheaper in price on the middle graph? 

 

 

Yep at that price you can't go too far wrong, and yes it should give a performance boost to everything.  Ignore the pricing on the CPUBenchmark link - it just scrapes the price from Amazon or wherever at the last price that chip was listed at.  Neither the 3500+ or the X2 have been sold new for a number of years.

 

Very interesting. So as a general rule would you say that you can use even a brand new card in an older system such as mine and it would still be better quality than older cards but just not able to function at as high of speeds as it may be capable on a newer motherboard? Is there a way to tell what card is better than what card other than i'm sure websites/web searching.

 

 

 

I'd just advise a bit of caution here.  Although the PCIe spec is backwards and forwards compatible, and new cards should work on older systems, albeit limited by a slower PCI Express 1.0 bus, from what I've read there can sometimes be compatibility problems with old systems.  There's no hard and fast rule, but when you consider many new graphics cards have more video RAM on board than most systems of 11-12 years ago supported as main memory, and there have been new developments like UEFI firmware on new systems replacing BIOS on old ones, it's inevitable some compatibility issues will result.

 

The site I linked to www.videocardbenchmark.net while not perfect (it's based on a synthetic benchmark suite, and so may not represent real gaming performance) is at least able to give a rough guide on how one card stacks up against another in terms of processing power.  The TechPowerUp GPU database is good for the more techie details and for finding reviews.

 

Memory sticks, I think Crucial are quite good.  They'll guarantee compatibility or money back if you use their memory selector/scanner tool.  Corsair, G.Skill, Kingston - also pretty reputable.

 

Unfortunately I think your CD/DVD drive is IDE.  IDE ports are no longer provided on new systems - they have moved to SATA.  While you could potentially use an adapter, it might be just as well to buy a SATA drive.  Fortunately, these are cheap - new DVD burners can be found for $12..


Edited by jonuk76, 29 March 2018 - 10:51 PM.

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#7 MadmanRB

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Posted 31 March 2018 - 01:07 PM

One question: is this a full tower PC or small form factor?

If full tower you are in luck as you may be able to turn that into a sleeper gaming PC, sure it would not be the best thing out there but you could in theory turn it into a more modern rig without much effort.


Edited by MadmanRB, 31 March 2018 - 01:08 PM.

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#8 Sacrifice

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Posted 31 March 2018 - 02:24 PM

One question: is this a full tower PC or small form factor?

If full tower you are in luck as you may be able to turn that into a sleeper gaming PC, sure it would not be the best thing out there but you could in theory turn it into a more modern rig without much effort.

it is a full tower pc






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