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optical drive fails to burn


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#1 MrD2358

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Posted 25 March 2018 - 08:02 AM

On HP 15 TS Notebook PC laptop
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 10 (64-bit)

I once burned audio CDs without a problem.  Now, the process appears to complete but the CD is blank.

 

Long story short, if possible:

HP laptop with Win8.1 new, upgraded to Win10.  Then, HD failed, so replaced, restored (to Win8.1) using recovery thumb drive, then upgraded to Win10 again.  Reinstalled software(s), restored backup, and all seemed hunky-dory.

 

Trying to burn an audio CD using three different sofwares (Media Player, Power2Go, CDBurnerXP) and all go through the process and give successful report, but CD is blank.  Take CD out and reinsert gets Windows dialog box "how do you want to use this CD - Flash Drive or CD.  It's like the CD wasn't touched at all. I have verified the setting for simulation burn is not ticked.

 

Even trying to create data disc (dragging files from Windows Explorer to CD drive) and it fails the same way. It appears to work, but the disc is blank.

 

Optical drive does play music CDs, and shows data CD contents.  It reads, but won't write.  I have tried CD-R and CD-RW discs, including blanks of the same ones I had when it worked fine.

 

Using Device Manager, I have tried to update drivers (current one installed is "latest" - cdrom-sys) and uninstalled the unit and rebooted to reinstall it.  Still no joy.

 

Welcome any ideas.  I have a couple log files attached, one from a "successful" burn that in fact did not burn, and three from failures. The successful one was using Maxell CD-R disc, the fails using Staples brand CD-RW.  The successful burn disc is blank however, and appears to still be usable.  Maybe something in the failure technobabble will make sense to you??

 

Thanks,

David

 

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#2 DavisMcCarn

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Posted 25 March 2018 - 09:46 AM

Optical drives have multiple lasers for reading and writing to media.  They all decay with time; but, sometimes they just fail.  I think the laser that writes has failed which explains why it still reads OK.

 

DVD drives for laptops; though are sub-$20 on eBay and are usually very easy to replace.


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#3 britechguy

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Posted 25 March 2018 - 09:48 AM

All I can tell you is that it is not at all uncommon, particularly in laptops, for the write capability of optical drives to fail.  I have had two where they continued to read optical media just fine but would not write.  My suggestion would be to replace the drive if you routinely need to write optical media.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#4 MrD2358

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Posted 25 March 2018 - 09:56 AM

Thank you both for the (disheartening) replies.  Is there anyway to test the write laser beyond what I'm doing - that is, trying to write a CD and having it fail?  Or is it just a fair assumption that since the drive reads but doesn't write, that the answer is the write laser has given up the ghost?  



#5 britechguy

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Posted 25 March 2018 - 10:01 AM

It really doesn't matter, per se, what the precise mechanism of failure is.  You know the write function has failed.

 

As DavisMcCarn has already noted optical drives for laptops can be purchased for very little money.  The replacement of same is dirt simple on every laptop I've ever worked on.  There's typically a single screw that you will see on the bottom of the laptop just beyond the depth of the drive tray itself.  When that's removed the drive can be slid right out as a unit.  The replacement slides right in, the screw goes back, and away you go.

 

Just make sure to get one that fits your machine, and by that I mean has an external tray configuration that matches the curvature of the machine it's being installed in to.  There are untold hundreds of different shapes out there, so search for one that fits your make/model.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#6 MrD2358

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Posted 25 March 2018 - 10:11 AM

It really doesn't matter, per se, what the precise mechanism of failure is.  You know the write function has failed.

 

As DavisMcCarn has already noted optical drives for laptops can be purchased for very little money.  The replacement of same is dirt simple on every laptop I've ever worked on.  There's typically a single screw that you will see on the bottom of the laptop just beyond the depth of the drive tray itself.  When that's removed the drive can be slid right out as a unit.  The replacement slides right in, the screw goes back, and away you go.

 

Just make sure to get one that fits your machine, and by that I mean has an external tray configuration that matches the curvature of the machine it's being installed in to.  There are untold hundreds of different shapes out there, so search for one that fits your make/model.

 

True, it doesn't work so the "why" is fairly irrelevant.  Just curiosity getting the better of me.  Good idea though about getting the "fit" right.  I'll keep that in mind while shopping.

Many thanks for your insights.



#7 DavisMcCarn

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Posted 25 March 2018 - 12:07 PM

Search for the <complete model number> DVD drive and look to see if the plastic facing matches what you have. (i.e. Dell 15-5555 DVD drive)


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