Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Can't boot, HDD seems unrecognizable


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 Layka91

Layka91

  • Members
  • 2 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:09:57 AM

Posted 22 March 2018 - 07:25 AM

Hi all, I seriously need some help...
 
3 days ago, while I was working, the computer got freezed and a blue screen showed up.
 
 
After that, I can't boot windows. I tried everything, repair start, booting in safe mode, booting on normal mode.. Nothing works.
 
When I try to boot on safe mode, the last driver getting loaded or the one that always is stuck is:
aswbidsha.sys
 
I tried unplugging the HDD and conect it to another computer, to backup files, but is not recognizable.
 
My brother tried a program called ntfs4dos from Avira wich allowed him to "navigate" through the HDD, and every folder seems to be ok.
 
He tried chkdsk but seems it can't detect the drive. We tried to repair the system from the windows7 dvd, but nothing. We recently discover a "trick" that allows to open a notepad.exe from command console and choose open and copy the files to a flash drive. But it shows 2 disk partitions, one called "Reserved for the system" (C:)  wich is about 100mb, and another one, (D:) which must be the one containing all the data.
But we can't click on that.
 
Today, my brother told me that is possible that the mbr is corrupt. Or the bootsec.
 
 
If someone could at least give us some light.. some tips for what it could be at least or what to do.. I'll be so grateful... I've lost the work from the entire past year...
 
Any help is welcome.
 
Thanks for reading.

Edited by hamluis, 22 March 2018 - 01:35 PM.
Moved from Internal Hardware to Disk Mgmt - Hamluis.


BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 hamluis

hamluis

    Moderator


  • Moderator
  • 56,113 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Killeen, TX
  • Local time:03:57 AM

Posted 22 March 2018 - 07:38 AM

No sign of lifeas a secondary drive on another system...I would connect it to another system and run the long diagnostic in SeaTools For Windows.

 

Louis



#3 JohnC_21

JohnC_21

  • Members
  • 24,297 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:04:57 AM

Posted 22 March 2018 - 08:31 AM

If you can access the files with NTFS for DOS then you can access the files using a live linux boot disk. I have had issues where Windows will not read a drive and linux could. In regards to the drive letters. The 100MB partition is required for Windows to boot and it was labeled C: which is normal when booting outside of Windows.

 

Download Mint Cinnamon. Burn the iso to a DVD by right clicking and selecting Burn Disk Image. Boot the DVD. Do not input anything during the boot process. At the desktop click Computer on the desktop. In the lower left pane you will see your HDD labeled in GBs. Click on it. If linux is able to mount the disk a File Manager Window will open showing your files.

 

Attach a USB external drive to the computer. A USB icon will appear and the drive will automount, opening another Window. You can copy and paste your files on the HDD to your USB external. After retrieving your data then we can look at repairing the boot files.

 

Mint Cinnamon

https://blog.linuxmint.com/?p=3457

 

If you do not have a DVD disk you can use a USB flash drive using Rufus. Attach the flash drive and run Rufus. Select MBR partition scheme. If you know your computer has UEFI then select GPT partition scheme. Leave all boxes as checked. If you see FreeDos in the dropdown box select iso image. Click the icon and browse to the Mint iso file. Press Start. Backup any data on the flash drive as it will be formatted.



#4 lobstrick

lobstrick

  • Members
  • 2 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New York
  • Local time:04:57 AM

Posted 22 March 2018 - 10:11 AM

I would recommend use Testdisk to copy your file or recover files if it is not accessible. Testdisk is an open source solution which works on most OSes. so get to another computer connect your drive and try TestDisk. CGSecurity dot org is the address. Read manual before starting the process...



#5 Layka91

Layka91
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 2 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:09:57 AM

Posted 22 March 2018 - 12:05 PM

Thanks, thanks a lot for the help guys! Really.
 
 
 

If you can access the files with NTFS for DOS then you can access the files using a live linux boot disk. I have had issues where Windows will not read a drive and linux could. In regards to the drive letters. The 100MB partition is required for Windows to boot and it was labeled C: which is normal when booting outside of Windows.
 
Download Mint Cinnamon. Burn the iso to a DVD by right clicking and selecting Burn Disk Image. Boot the DVD. Do not input anything during the boot process. At the desktop click Computer on the desktop. In the lower left pane you will see your HDD labeled in GBs. Click on it. If linux is able to mount the disk a File Manager Window will open showing your files.
 
Attach a USB external drive to the computer. A USB icon will appear and the drive will automount, opening another Window. You can copy and paste your files on the HDD to your USB external. After retrieving your data then we can look at repairing the boot files.
 
Mint Cinnamon
https://blog.linuxmint.com/?p=3457
 
If you do not have a DVD disk you can use a USB flash drive using Rufus. Attach the flash drive and run Rufus. Select MBR partition scheme. If you know your computer has UEFI then select GPT partition scheme. Leave all boxes as checked. If you see FreeDos in the dropdown box select iso image. Click the icon and browse to the Mint iso file. Press Start. Backup any data on the flash drive as it will be formatted.

 
Thanks a lot John!
 
Sadly it didn't let me mount the hdd.
It say the drive is ok, but it has 22 bad sectors:
 
(I don't know why the image is not appearing, here is a link with a photo https://imgur.com/a/oSZOT )
 
 
I also noticed that there is an option for setting wich partition is bootable.
https://imgur.com/a/LCjDQ
 
Actually is set on bootable the smallest one. 
Do you guys know if I set on bootable the partition that contains my Windows, it will boot?
 
Again... thanks a lot for your answers, now I got some hope... :)
Thanks.

#6 JohnC_21

JohnC_21

  • Members
  • 24,297 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:04:57 AM

Posted 22 March 2018 - 12:26 PM

The last thing I would do is run chkdsk on a drive you want to get data from. Having bad sectors is probably why the computer will not boot, especially if the errors are in the boot partition.

 

You can tap F8 at boot and select Repair Computer. After Selecting Repair Computer select Startup Repair. It may take up to three attempts to repair Windows. I would do this first. If that fails then I would run Testdisk on a computer with the drive attached. Unzip Testdisk to a folder on the desktop of the good computer. Run Testdisk and look for your HDD you wish to recover. Run a Quick Search for any partitions. On any partition found highlight it and press "P". If any files are found they can be copied over to the other drive your started Testdisk from but you would need at lease the amount of free space as the amount of data you are recovering.

 

I can also give instructions on using Mint Cinnamon. This would be if the drive is in the computer that does not boot, not if you are connecting the drive to a good computer via a USB adapter or internally. You would need a USB external drive attached to the computer to recovery your data.

 

https://www.cgsecurity.org/wiki/TestDisk_Step_By_Step

 

This is the repair screen of Windows 7 after selecting Repair Computer. You want Startup Repair.

 

windows-7-startup-repair-7-5807115d3df78

 

Edit: It's not the main Windows partition that is bootable. The bootable flag is for the 100MB System Reserved Partition.

 

You can confirm this by using diskpart at a command prompt

 

diskpart

list disk

select disk X where X is the number of your Windows drive

list partition

select partition X    where X is the number associated with the 100MB partition

detail partition        This will tell you if the partition is Active which means bootable.


Edited by JohnC_21, 22 March 2018 - 12:34 PM.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users