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How bad if use alternative browser based on Chrome 51 ?


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#1 cafejose

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Posted 21 March 2018 - 01:46 AM

How bad is to use an alternative web browser based on Chrome 51, on Windows Vista?  

 

The browser in use is because it is the latest version recommended for use on Windows Vista.

 

How safe?  The machine also has up-to-date Security & Protection software (commercial).



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#2 NickAu

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Posted 21 March 2018 - 01:54 AM

Hi

 

What browser is it?

 

Regards

Nick



#3 cafejose

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Posted 21 March 2018 - 02:47 AM

Slimjet version 11 (which is based on Chrome 51).

 

System is:

Laptop, Toshiba Satellite
Windows Vista, s.p.2
Security & Protection:  Norton Security v22.12.1.15
Favored Installed Browers: Opera v36, Pale Moon v27,
Other browsers avaialbe: Slimjet v11, Comodo Ice Dragon v52, Firefox v56, Internet Explorer v9



#4 NickAu

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Posted 21 March 2018 - 02:59 AM

Slim Jet for Linux is a good browser in my opinion, I have no reason to think it would be any different on Windows.



#5 cafejose

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Posted 21 March 2018 - 03:03 AM

Slim Jet for Linux is a good browser in my opinion, I have no reason to think it would be any different on Windows.

No doubt but my question is about security and safey.  All I find as disadvantages is YouTube works imperfectly but still does work.  Otherwise, I am asking about security and safety.  Chrome 51 is not up-to-date, but I use Slimjet 11 (sometimes) which is based on Chrome 51.  I can NOT use Chrome/Google Chrome 65 on this machine. 



#6 devilus

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Posted 21 March 2018 - 05:58 AM

Slimjet version 11 (which is based on Chrome 51).

 

System is:

Laptop, Toshiba Satellite
Windows Vista, s.p.2
Security & Protection:  Norton Security v22.12.1.15
Favored Installed Browers: Opera v36, Pale Moon v27,
Other browsers avaialbe: Slimjet v11, Comodo Ice Dragon v52, Firefox v56, Internet Explorer v9

Are you sure? I think the latest version of Slimjet supporting Vista is 10.0.13.0 (based on Chromium 50). Is there another version which I don't know?


Self-built PC, Lian-Li PC-A70B, GA-EX38-DS5, Intel Core 2 Duo 3GHz, Leadtek 9600GT, Kingston 4GB DDR2, Enermax Galaxy 850W

Selective boot (F12):

Vista Ultimate SP2 32bit, installed 2008, Samsung HD502HJ (500GB, SATA)

Windows 7 Ultimate SP1 64bit, installed 2016, Samsung 850 EVO (120GB, SSD)

Linux Mint 18.3 Cinnamon 64 bit, installed 2018, Intel 320 (120GB, SSD)


#7 cafejose

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Posted 21 March 2018 - 12:42 PM

 

Slimjet version 11 (which is based on Chrome 51).

 

System is:

Laptop, Toshiba Satellite
Windows Vista, s.p.2
Security & Protection:  Norton Security v22.12.1.15
Favored Installed Browers: Opera v36, Pale Moon v27,
Other browsers avaialbe: Slimjet v11, Comodo Ice Dragon v52, Firefox v56, Internet Explorer v9

Are you sure? I think the latest version of Slimjet supporting Vista is 10.0.13.0 (based on Chromium 50). Is there another version which I don't know?

 

Flashpeak did say to use version 11 for a time, but later changed to saying to use version 10.  I stuck with version 11.  

 

I have tried their version 18 on Windows 10 and all seems good this way; but I will normally use google Chrome when in Windows 10 most of the time.  



#8 GeekzwebDOTcom

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Posted 21 March 2018 - 02:13 PM

I don't think this question is so much about using an alternative browser as it is about versions of browsers.  Any time you are using an older version of a browser, you can expect that there might be vulnerabilities or bugs.  That is what drives the creation of new versions.  Is this particular version vulnerable?  I would imagine that you could google that question and come back with some interesting results.  I would suggest that you run the latest version of any browser you are using on Vista.  I would also suggest that you upgrade your version of Windows, if possible.



#9 cat1092

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Posted 24 March 2018 - 06:49 PM

I don't think this question is so much about using an alternative browser as it is about versions of browsers.  Any time you are using an older version of a browser, you can expect that there might be vulnerabilities or bugs.  That is what drives the creation of new versions.  Is this particular version vulnerable?  I would imagine that you could google that question and come back with some interesting results.  I would suggest that you run the latest version of any browser you are using on Vista.  I would also suggest that you upgrade your version of Windows, if possible.

 

+1! :thumbup2:

 

It's not just the browser at risk, if it's the latest version sought after, the OS needs to be upgraded to make it more secure. :)

 

Windows Vista hasn't been updated for some time & unlike the two extra years XP holdouts had, most browsers, security choices & other offerings came to a halt before EOL of the OS. I recommend at a minimum, upgrading to Windows 7 SP1 (8.1 or W10 would be a much better return on investment), or go with a Linux install, which is free of cost & no 3rd party security required. Just have to make sure the Firewall is enabled, and for better protection, make sure that if a wireless router is used, change all default passwords (these can be found via Google), disable remote administration & UP&P, and have a complex wireless WPA-PSK2 passphrase that contains both upper & lower case letters, numbers & a few of the specialized keys (~!@#$%^&*()_+-=?/><). Just two or three of these keys added will make a script kiddie look to freeload from someone else's Internet connection, will keep all other than professional data thieves away. 

 

Even if you can update your browser to the latest now, it's not going to last forever (may already be out of luck if running 32 bit), the risk far outweighs any benefit gained. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#10 GeekzwebDOTcom

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Posted 25 March 2018 - 05:38 PM

Well said, cat.  Now, I also understand that there are times, especially in the commercial world where you are forced to stick with an OS or piece of software past it's EOS or EOL, but that should only be done until you can successfully get off that version.  And there should be risk mitigations in place until you are able to do so.  For home users, I don't see the value.  I am an amateur radio operator (ham) and I often have friends who use older versions of their operating system because software for ham radio operators is not being produced or updated at a rate that can keep up with operating system releases.  I understand that you may need to run an older version of an OS for this, but does that PC require Internet connectivity?  If so, what can be done to protect it?  



#11 cat1092

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Posted 25 March 2018 - 09:40 PM

 

 I understand that you may need to run an older version of an OS for this, but does that PC require Internet connectivity?  If so, what can be done to protect it?  

 

 

Well, if you cannot update the browser or upgrade the OS (even a no cost Linux one), then the best thing to do is make regular full drive backups & use only when needed. Backups are the best physical restore point to good working order one can have, and perhaps the best protection. If these were available for Vista, my recommendation would be to use a VPN service (often on promo for as little as $2.99/month when purchasing & paying for 3 years service). Unfortunately, most of the best requires Windows 7 SP1 or newer, you'd likely be left with bottom of the barrel choices. :(

 

Yet you can still lock down the router for best Firewall defense, which I covered above. This is an task that way too many overlooks in their security configuration & provides much more protection than the one provided by the OS or a AV/IS package. If you're going to use this (or any) computer on the Internet, even if just a little, lock down the Firewall as much as possible. Instructions for a given model can be found with the instruction or setup guide, or be found online. Even the latest OS's benefits from this, security begins at the point of entry, not the Ethernet or wireless interface of any connected computers. 

 

I still have a single XP Pro SP3 system, used only to assist a couple of close friends & when needed, it's still very useful Hyperterminal is a powerful tool. Which didn't ship with Vista onwards, not too long back, rescued a 500GB Seagate 7200.11 HDD, the infamous one that led an outright uproar across many tech forums 8-10 years back. Don't know what the big deal was, fixed mine in under 45 minutes with a sub-$15 gadget & had never done it prior. Point being, these OS's can still be useful when used offline, many of today's OS's doesn't have the tools of the legacy. 

 

BTW, my uncle was an avid ham radio operator, this was long before computers were available (let alone affordable) for Home users. He was on that equipment a lot, don't know what exactly he was doing, only that could communicate for very long distances & had to have an FCC license. Other than that, don't know any other details. :)

 

Am sure that Vista has similar uses & it's 100% OK to use these legacy systems offline. Many machine shops are still running W2K to power the equipment used for machinery operations (example, the rebuilding of both diesel & gas engines). There's big money in this & I'm positive that the shop owners would be thrilled to upgrade to a later OS (actually W2K was/is more secure than XP), it's just that the OEM of the equipment didn't rewrite software to work with newer ones. Rather were focused more on manufacturing equipment that works with the latest OS (be it Windows or Linux) available.

 

Good Luck with the computer & your ham radio hobby, don't believe as many uses these as long ago, first time heard it mentioned for years. :)

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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