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Ethernet cable types


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#1 Miguel_92

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Posted 20 March 2018 - 07:35 PM

I have no idea about networking really apart from a few things i learned in school and college, but i was wondering what is the difference between a shielded/unshielded ethernet cable? And what performance differences do you get if any really? Because even if they lower my ping by a few numbers or even give me a bit more speed i would be satisfied, but i'll assume ping speed while gaming etc is based on the ISP you have etc. Thanks.



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#2 Sneakycyber

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Posted 21 March 2018 - 11:33 AM

Here you go!


Chad Mockensturm 
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#3 Miguel_92

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Posted 21 March 2018 - 06:53 PM

Thank you! I have another minor issue, because i got given a new "Superhub 3.0" by my ISP which gives me 8 ping during a speed test when i am wired to it, but i have to turn on modem mode to use my own router and all of a sudden it's leaped to 13 ping via my router connection on my pc. I know it's not massive, but when i play on American servers on my Playstation i think it's making the number go a bit higher than it should. Is there a way i can find out why it's happened? As i do not want to factory reset my router lol. Asus RT-AC3200 Fibre/Cable router is the one i have. Thanks


Edited by Miguel_92, 21 March 2018 - 06:59 PM.


#4 Orecomm

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Posted 23 March 2018 - 05:55 PM

Any time you hit a router you are going to pick up a little ping delay. The router has to receive all of the bits in the packet, then compare the destination address to it's routing table (which should be pretty simple for a home router - it's either the local inside net, outside net which includes the upstream gateway). In a home router it also has to swap some IP addresses around (for NAT) and keep track of what goes where, then reassemble the packet, queue it to send with any other outbound traffic, and send it on it's way. It all happens pretty quick, but when you are measuring time in 1/1000's of a second it adds up. Your router is getting it done in 5/1000's of a second, not too bad. There may be a little tuning possibly, but in all likelihood more trouble than it's worth. I don't know that particular router, but various manufacturers have "tweaks" that provide a minimal boost to some traffic at the expense of others. It won't make much difference if you are the only one using the pipe, though.



#5 Miguel_92

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Posted 25 March 2018 - 06:17 PM

Any time you hit a router you are going to pick up a little ping delay. The router has to receive all of the bits in the packet, then compare the destination address to it's routing table (which should be pretty simple for a home router - it's either the local inside net, outside net which includes the upstream gateway). In a home router it also has to swap some IP addresses around (for NAT) and keep track of what goes where, then reassemble the packet, queue it to send with any other outbound traffic, and send it on it's way. It all happens pretty quick, but when you are measuring time in 1/1000's of a second it adds up. Your router is getting it done in 5/1000's of a second, not too bad. There may be a little tuning possibly, but in all likelihood more trouble than it's worth. I don't know that particular router, but various manufacturers have "tweaks" that provide a minimal boost to some traffic at the expense of others. It won't make much difference if you are the only one using the pipe, though.

Well, when i had a broken hub from my ISP the ping was still at 8 through my router and since i got the new one it's jumped to 13 but seen as i am not an expert i will not fiddle with it lol. I wonder if just resetting it would fix it, but then i'd need to do a lot of firmware updates/my settings so it isn't worth the hassle as my speeds still reach 385mbps lol and my upload reaches 25 :D.



#6 Sneakycyber

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Posted 25 March 2018 - 08:34 PM

You can backup the settings of the Asus router and the firmware won't downgrade itself during a factory reset (unless your running custom/open firmware).


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