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Clean install dual boot Mint 18.3 & Windows 10


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#1 kristi4

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Posted 18 March 2018 - 09:47 PM

Hi,

After spending much of the day troubleshooting win 10 issues in the win 10 forum I've decided to do a clean install of both win 10 & Linux MInt. I gave Linux a whirl a few days ago & liked it.

I want to make sure that this is done so it's easy enough, if needed, to remove one OS without affecting the other. 

 

I have an ASUS Q302LA 

A bootable USB with win 10

Same with Linux Mint 18.3

Stuff is backed up on an old HD

 

Do I need to look at any BIOS settings other than changing the boot priority?

 

 

 

 



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#2 Gary R

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Posted 19 March 2018 - 04:28 AM

In Windows 10, ensure that "fast boot" is disabled ... https://www.tenforums.com/tutorials/4189-turn-off-fast-startup-windows-10-a.html ... before you shut down, or your computer may not shut down properly, and you may not be able to boot from your USB drive.

 

Whilst with Mint it's not really necessary to disable "Secure Boot" in BIOS/UEFI, it doesn't do any harm if you do, and it may prevent problems.

 

Once that's done, and you get round to re-installing from USB, be sure to install Windows 10 before you install Mint.

 

The Windows installer does not recognise Mint as an OS, and will mess things up if you install Mint first.  Whereas the Mint installer will recognise Windows, and will happily install Mint alongside it, and make the appropriate adjustments in Grub, so that you are able to boot into either.



#3 kristi4

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Posted 19 March 2018 - 06:30 AM

So I did windows & shrunk the c: partition by 100gb. It fellt a little weird that that was all I had to do (not give it a letter or anything to ID it). I then successfully booted into Linux & began the install. I chose install alongside windows & a warning came up about it having to do something resulting in a #5 & #6 along with a 3 letter code. (Sorry. It was almost 2:00 a.m., otherwise I would have written it down.) I said ok, continue & it started to do something & then another (different) warning and up with the option to retry, however also informing me if I did retry, it could mess something up. Tried to back out. Froze & I then aborted mission.
Only thing I can think of is did I need to restart windows in order for the shrinking to finish & then boot into Linux?

#4 kristi4

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Posted 19 March 2018 - 06:46 AM

Hmmmm..... I just found this. These instructions to choose "something else" were not on the site I was using as a guide.
https://www.tecmint.com/install-linux-mint-18-alongside-windows-10-or-8-in-dual-boot-uefi-mode/

#5 MadmanRB

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Posted 19 March 2018 - 07:30 AM

The "something else" is for more advanced users

 

If you are familiar with gparted and setting up a different partition for /home and /(root) its a great option


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#6 kristi4

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Posted 19 March 2018 - 08:42 AM

Well it worked up until I had a Grub2 installation fail. Any suggestions? Gparted is showing that close to 6 GB of my / partition is used, so itdid not back all the way out of the installation.

Edited by kristi4, 19 March 2018 - 08:43 AM.


#7 JohnC_21

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Posted 19 March 2018 - 10:36 AM

Here is one of the better guides I found. The most important part is to tell the install you want grub installed in the EFI boot loader.

 

It sets you up with a separate home partition. 

 

https://www.tecmint.com/install-linux-mint-18-alongside-windows-10-or-8-in-dual-boot-uefi-mode/

 

I think you will need to repair your Grub install on the Windows EFI partition. That is something one of the linux guru's here will help with if needed.



#8 kristi4

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Posted 19 March 2018 - 12:45 PM

This is actually one of the ones I used to cross reference with another that did basically the same thing, just using the + sign that opens a box where you can choose primary, size, name, etc. One thing I have seen elsewhere (post grub problems) that is not covered in this guide or the other I used is creating a 700mb /boot partition & a 400mb EFI partition. This is somehow directly related to Grub installation, I guess.

#9 JohnC_21

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Posted 19 March 2018 - 01:03 PM

This is actually one of the ones I used to cross reference with another that did basically the same thing, just using the + sign that opens a box where you can choose primary, size, name, etc. One thing I have seen elsewhere (post grub problems) that is not covered in this guide or the other I used is creating a 700mb /boot partition & a 400mb EFI partition. This is somehow directly related to Grub installation, I guess.

I not quite sure why you would want to create a 700MB boot partition and 400mb EFI partition. I would clean install Windows 10 making sure that the C: partition is the last partition on the drive. If not I would shrink the C: partition and move any partition on the right of C: until it's adjacent to C: leaving unallocated space on the end of the drive. I would then follow the guide, creating the root partition and the work partition. I wouldn't bother with a swap if you have a lot of RAM. When it gets to the point where it asks where you want to install grub select the Windows EFI partition, step 12 in the guide I linked to.



#10 pcpunk

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Posted 19 March 2018 - 03:17 PM

Don't we need to confirm if Windows 10 was indeed installed in UEFI Mode first, and as GPT?  And if installed as MBR, how many Primary Partitions have been created?

https://www.tenforums.com/tutorials/85195-check-if-windows-10-using-uefi-legacy-bios.html

 

Sounds like either the wrong place for bootloader was chosen or there are too many Primary Partitions. But before anything else is done we should look at what has been created so far.

 

Does Windows boot at this point?

 

Have you got all your Windows problems sorted from before?

 

As John said, don't worry about the boot partition in linux, that would be for more advanced users to fool around with.


Edited by pcpunk, 19 March 2018 - 03:39 PM.

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#11 kristi4

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Posted 19 March 2018 - 09:10 PM


This is actually one of the ones I used to cross reference with another that did basically the same thing, just using the + sign that opens a box where you can choose primary, size, name, etc. One thing I have seen elsewhere (post grub problems) that is not covered in this guide or the other I used is creating a 700mb /boot partition & a 400mb EFI partition. This is somehow directly related to Grub installation, I guess.

I not quite sure why you would want to create a 700MB boot partition and 400mb EFI partition. I would clean install Windows 10 making sure that the C: partition is the last partition on the drive. If not I would shrink the C: partition and move any partition on the right of C: until it's adjacent to C: leaving unallocated space on the end of the drive. I would then follow the guide, creating the root partition and the work partition. I wouldn't bother with a swap if you have a lot of RAM. When it gets to the point where it asks where you want to install grub select the Windows EFI partition, step 12 in the guide I linked to.

Other than the placement of the partitions you referred to, (which I didn't know to check so will have to do that), I am at a loss as to what part I missed. I got a little thrown when you put being asked if I want to install the grub cuz I didn't recall it being worded that way, however after double checking step 12 I get that it was your lingo for continuing with the install.

I

#12 kristi4

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Posted 19 March 2018 - 09:22 PM

Don't we need to confirm if Windows 10 was indeed installed in UEFI Mode first, and as GPT?  And if installed as MBR, how many Primary Partitions have been created?
https://www.tenforums.com/tutorials/85195-check-if-windows-10-using-uefi-legacy-bios.html
 
Sounds like either the wrong place for bootloader was chosen or there are too many Primary Partitions. But before anything else is done we should look at what has been created so far.
 
Does Windows boot at this point?
 
Have you got all your Windows problems sorted from before?
 
As John said, don't worry about the boot partition in linux, that would be for more advanced users to fool around with.


I have not been back into it since the clean install. Can ya blame me? & I did install GPT/UEFI. The partitions seem fine as far as I can tell. Root & home each have stuff installed in them. It's this grub2 error that makes it freeze. I finish the user/password screen & that's when it happens.

#13 kristi4

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Posted 19 March 2018 - 09:32 PM

Booted in to Windows no prob.



#14 JohnC_21

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Posted 20 March 2018 - 08:18 AM

Download and burn a disk or use Rufus to create a USB of Boot Repair. Backup any data you need off the Windows 10 install first. You need an internet connection. Use Ethernet if Wifi does not work.

 

https://sourceforge.net/p/boot-repair-cd/home/Home/



#15 kristi4

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Posted 20 March 2018 - 10:47 PM

Download and burn a disk or use Rufus to create a USB of Boot Repair. Backup any data you need off the Windows 10 install first. You need an internet connection. Use Ethernet if Wifi does not work.

 

https://sourceforge.net/p/boot-repair-cd/home/Home/

 

After I run this should I uninstall Linux since it partly installed & then do a fresh install?


Edited by kristi4, 20 March 2018 - 11:17 PM.





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