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Can law enforcement request cookie data from websites like facebook ?


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#1 DellKeyboard

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Posted 16 March 2018 - 07:34 AM

Sites like facebook, newspaper websites, ... use cookies which give them a lot of browsing information. Search websites like google log everything too, linked with our IP-adress. They probably keep it forever, whereas ISP's in my country are not required to store these data for more than 1 year. The ISP's probably discard them, as it's too much too log.

If police want browsing data of a suspect, can they request browsing history data older than 1 year from these sites ?

In Europe Facebook faces huge fines because of their breach of privacy through cookies, so wouldn't those data be unlawfully acquired ? I've never read about law enforcement doing this, probably because it's unlikely that old browsing data yield more evidence than new data.

I'm considering to terminate my FB account, I mean, FB knows everything what I search on the internet, that's insane :(


Edited by hamluis, 16 March 2018 - 07:58 AM.
Moved from Gen Security to Gen Chat - Hamluis.


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#2 mikey11

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Posted 16 March 2018 - 07:41 AM

 

If police want browsing data of a suspect, can they request browsing history data older than 1 year from these sites ?

 

if law enforcement think an online crime has been committed they can request data, but most websites wouldn't keep logs longer then 3 months.....its more common for a WEBSITE to report a crime to the police, then police coming to a website looking,

 

if police think an individual has committed an online crime its more common for law enforcement to get a search warrant from a court and they would go to a suspects home or business and seize their computers and phones......this would give them their internet history for as long back as the computer was used.....

 

What are you afraid of?.....if you havn't done anything wrong i see no reason to get rid of all your accounts.....

 

you might want to google "government data requests" and do some reading


Edited by hamluis, 16 March 2018 - 09:54 AM.


#3 DellKeyboard

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Posted 16 March 2018 - 08:05 AM

Probably not ... most browsers log only a few months of browsing history. It seems very unlikely that a 3 year used-computer would still have browsing data from the beginning ...


Edited by hamluis, 16 March 2018 - 09:53 AM.


#4 mikey11

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Posted 16 March 2018 - 08:27 AM

law enforcement can find EVERYTHING you have done on your computer.....even if you re-format your drive they can still find it!

 

they wouldn't bother going to website owners to track you.....that would take too long.....they would go directly to "the belly of the beast" and seize all your electronic devices and use the findings as evidence......

 

its more common then most people think.....happened to a close friend of mine.....

 

he was innocent and somebody was using his WIFI to commit fraud.....police knocked on his door at 11pm at night, he answered thinking their was a problem in the area or something, they came in and took his computers and phones.....

 

he was cleared of all charges because they found nothing, but it was still a huge hassle him not having his phone or computers for 4-6 weeks

 

again......what are you worried about?


Edited by hamluis, 16 March 2018 - 09:54 AM.


#5 buddy215

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Posted 16 March 2018 - 10:15 AM

facebook is tracking you and everyone else who isn't using NoScript to block their scripts in web pages....not just cookies.

It is not only facebook...I sometimes see as many as 40 scripts being blocked by NoScript on web pages. It takes quiet a bit of

effort to completely be anonymous...if that is even possible for home computers.

 

A screenshot of what is allowed by me and what scripts are being blocked when viewing your topic:

hoKbki7.png

 

I don't have a facebook account.


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#6 mikey11

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Posted 16 March 2018 - 11:29 AM



facebook is tracking you and everyone else who isn't using NoScript to block their scripts in web pages....not just cookies.

It is not only facebook...I sometimes see as many as 40 scripts being blocked by NoScript on web pages. It takes quiet a bit of

effort to completely be anonymous...if that is even possible for home computers.

 

 

 

another reason not to use facebook.....

 

i don't use any social media....facebook, twitter, etc etc.....dont have any need for it, i just don't see the point in it....why would i want to advertise everything i do in life to the public?.....what i WANT to share with friends, i send through email



#7 MarkMackerel

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Posted 16 March 2018 - 04:15 PM

facebook is tracking you and everyone else who isn't using NoScript to block their scripts in web pages....not just cookies.

It is not only facebook...I sometimes see as many as 40 scripts being blocked by NoScript on web pages. It takes quiet a bit of

effort to completely be anonymous...if that is even possible for home computers.

 

A screenshot of what is allowed by me and what scripts are being blocked when viewing your topic:

hoKbki7.png

 

I don't have a facebook account.

 

 

Nice post. I use Ublock Origin which blocks a lot of scripts.

 

These scripts are probably capable of turning on your webcam and taking vids/pics, turning on your mic, extracting data from your machine etc. You can't be too careful.



#8 quietman7

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Posted 17 March 2018 - 06:32 AM

If the law in a particular allows law enforcement to request such data, then certainly they can ask for it. However, in some cases a request for information may require a subpoena.
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#9 Chertoff

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Posted 20 March 2018 - 03:33 AM

Yep, if you have done any wrong activity they can.



#10 DellKeyboard

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Posted 24 March 2018 - 06:47 PM

Not too sure about that ... I've never heard of such a case. (In which they requested cookie data.)

They probably don't even think of it, as they focus on the computer itself, and maybe google queries. As they did with the Austin bomber case.



#11 DellKeyboard

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Posted 24 March 2018 - 06:51 PM

law enforcement can find EVERYTHING you have done on your computer.....even if you re-format your drive they can still find it!

 

they wouldn't bother going to website owners to track you.....that would take too long.....they would go directly to "the belly of the beast" and seize all your electronic devices and use the findings as evidence......

 

its more common then most people think.....happened to a close friend of mine.....

 

he was innocent and somebody was using his WIFI to commit fraud.....police knocked on his door at 11pm at night, he answered thinking their was a problem in the area or something, they came in and took his computers and phones.....

 

he was cleared of all charges because they found nothing, but it was still a huge hassle him not having his phone or computers for 4-6 weeks

 

again......what are you worried about?

You are exaggerating, data that has been overwritten a few times are unrecoverable, probably even with expensive forensic tools.

What I'm worried about ? Do you like the idea of the government being able to find out what you googled 5 years ago ?



#12 buddy215

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Posted 24 March 2018 - 07:08 PM

Source: How to stop Google from tracking you and delete your personal data | WIRED UK

 

Probably the least surprising of the lot, but Google has all of your search history stored up.

How to delete it: If you'd rather not have a list of ridiculous search queries stored up, then head to Google's history page, click Menu (the three vertical dots) and then hit Advanced -> All Time -> Delete.

 

If you want to stop Google tracking your searches for good, head to the activity controls page and toggle tracking off.

 

If you've used any of Google's opt-in voice features for yourself, then head to Google's Voice & Audio Activity page to review your voice searches and listen back to them. Be warned, this could be interesting, funny or just plain cringe-worthy.

To delete this database of embarrassing searches select one or more of the recordings from the check box beside them and then click "delete" at the top of the screen.

 

                               208285.png


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#13 britechguy

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Posted 24 March 2018 - 07:30 PM

If one is concerned about search engines tracking you there are several that don't.  I've been using DuckDuckGo for a long time now because it doesn't.  (And that's purely on principle.  I don't care whether someone has something to hide or not, what little bits of privacy we can still hold on to while interacting with cyberspace are worth holding on to.  They're few and far between.)

 

However, when it comes to posting anything on the worldwide web, the moment you release it "to the wild" you should presume that it will become public knowledge (at least if someone is determined to make it so, and sometimes not even then).


Edited by britechguy, 24 March 2018 - 07:32 PM.

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#14 mikey11

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Posted 25 March 2018 - 08:42 AM

 


 

Do you like the idea of the government being able to find out what you googled 5 years ago ?

 

 

 

it certainly wouldn't bother me......i don't have anything to hide.....you on the other hand, sound like you do



#15 quietman7

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Posted 25 March 2018 - 08:55 AM

It's not a matter of whether someone has something to hide or not. It's more a matter of government & the Big Tech industry involving itself in our privacy and all aspects of our daily life which many folks are opposed to...at least in the USA. That is one of several reasons I do not use any social media.

What I do, what I say, where I go, etc is none of their business.
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