Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Question about internet upload/download speeds


  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 matrixebiz

matrixebiz

  • Members
  • 24 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:08:58 AM

Posted 13 March 2018 - 01:54 PM

Hey gang, not sure where to ask this so maybe someone can point me in the right direction.

 

I'm trying to understand how download and upload speed works when there are multiple people.

 

If my Internet is 150 Mbps Download and 10 Mbps upload and if I'm uploading a video at 5 Mbps, then start another video upload at 5 Mbps does that mean I am using all 10 Mbps and can't upload anymore? or does that mean I am still only using 5 Mbps of my total speed regardless of how many video files I upload?

Thanks


Edited by hamluis, 13 March 2018 - 02:13 PM.
Moved from Win 7 to Networking - Hamluis.


BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 zbuster225

zbuster225

  • Members
  • 10 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:05:58 AM

Posted 13 March 2018 - 04:24 PM

If my Internet is 150 Mbps Download and 10 Mbps upload and if I'm uploading a video at 5 Mbps, then start another video upload at 5 Mbps does that mean I am using all 10 Mbps and can't upload anymore?

 

 

Trap question! Yes to part and no to part.

 

Yes, you are using the full 10Mbps (you're correct in thinking the numbers are added together.) But that doesn't mean you can't upload anymore.  If you're on a 10Mbps connection, you are uploading two videos, each at a rate of 5Mbps, and you start to upload a third, you'll most likely just drop the speeds of each of them down to 3.3Mbps.  So you certainly could upload more videos.



#3 matrixebiz

matrixebiz
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 24 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:08:58 AM

Posted 14 March 2018 - 07:37 AM

Okay, thanks for the clarification.

Is there a Windows Network monitoring program I can install that will check this and let me know what upload speeds I can expect at currently at peek times or do I just use speedtest.net while my computers are uploading and it will tell me the current rate I should expect for the next upload? so if speedtest.net now says my upload speed is 2Mbps while my network is currently under load (Computers currently uploading videos) then I should hold off uploading anymore until speedtest.net shows my upload speeds back up to better speeds like 7-8 Mbps?



#4 Sneakycyber

Sneakycyber

    Network Engineer


  • BC Advisor
  • 6,107 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ohio
  • Local time:08:58 AM

Posted 15 March 2018 - 08:02 AM

Speedtest is not affected by anything happening on your local network. It tests the speed between your modem and the internet, you could be maxing out your connection and still get a full speed test result. The caveat being if you are maxing out your upload/download your latency will be high and you can start dropping packets. I am not sure of software for the computer that will show you your current bandwidth usage. However Ubiquity Edgerouters show you what your upload/download utilization is and which network (if you have multiple VLANs) is using it. There may be others out there but I am not familiar with them. 


Chad Mockensturm 

Systems and Network Engineer

Certified CompTia Network +, A +


#5 matrixebiz

matrixebiz
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 24 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:08:58 AM

Posted 15 March 2018 - 09:27 AM

Okay, thanks so what would be a high latency? is that the Ping result? If I am getting 17 ms, does that mean everything is still good?



#6 Sneakycyber

Sneakycyber

    Network Engineer


  • BC Advisor
  • 6,107 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ohio
  • Local time:08:58 AM

Posted 15 March 2018 - 09:40 AM

Wideband internet (over Coax cable) 17ms isn't too bad. The ping reply time also depends on the distance to the server you are testing from and the load on the server. It shouldn't exceed 20ms unless your maxing out your bandwidth. If your on Fiber it shouldn't be anywhere near 17ms. 


Chad Mockensturm 

Systems and Network Engineer

Certified CompTia Network +, A +


#7 matrixebiz

matrixebiz
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 24 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:08:58 AM

Posted 15 March 2018 - 09:55 AM

I'm on DSL



#8 Sneakycyber

Sneakycyber

    Network Engineer


  • BC Advisor
  • 6,107 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ohio
  • Local time:08:58 AM

Posted 15 March 2018 - 02:28 PM

17ms is good for DSL.


Chad Mockensturm 

Systems and Network Engineer

Certified CompTia Network +, A +


#9 matrixebiz

matrixebiz
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 24 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:08:58 AM

Posted 16 March 2018 - 12:44 PM

Okay, so if I select the same server every time in speedtest.net and I start to get 40+ ping times then my network uploading is starting to get maxed out? or is it more complicated than that? I was reading some stuff on using 'iperf' but not sure if I need to use that for testing if my network is getting close to maxing out my uploading.

What are your thoughts?



#10 Sneakycyber

Sneakycyber

    Network Engineer


  • BC Advisor
  • 6,107 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ohio
  • Local time:08:58 AM

Posted 16 March 2018 - 02:05 PM

Besides Uploading allot of stuff what is your concern? Are you trying to find out if you need faster internet? Are you trying to upload as many files as you possibly can at the fastest you possibly can?


Chad Mockensturm 

Systems and Network Engineer

Certified CompTia Network +, A +


#11 matrixebiz

matrixebiz
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 24 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:08:58 AM

Posted 16 March 2018 - 02:28 PM

I am uploading video streams to my internet server and I need to find out if I'm getting close to my upload limit speed/bandwidth at the source as to not get into a scenario where some streams are waiting too long to update their packet on the server which would cause loading/buffering issues on the clients (server) side while it's waiting for the video stream to catch up from the source (me)

 

So I need to determine if uploading stream 3 is all my internet will be able to do successfully without packet waiting or is 8, 9 10 streams still ok.



#12 Vicin

Vicin

  • Members
  • 64 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sweden
  • Local time:02:58 PM

Posted 17 March 2018 - 05:39 AM

Besides Uploading allot of stuff what is your concern? Are you trying to find out if you need faster internet? Are you trying to upload as many files as you possibly can at the fastest you possibly can?

Maybe I'm going a bit off topic, however I feel it's related to the topic.

 

Would it be more efficient to upload at 95-ish % of capacity or 100 % I'm thinking the stress of 100 % could cause packet loss and reseeding of packets, and thus be less efficient. But at the same time I could imagine using it at 100 % to be more efficient data transfer as a result of the full utilization of the speed.



#13 Sneakycyber

Sneakycyber

    Network Engineer


  • BC Advisor
  • 6,107 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ohio
  • Local time:08:58 AM

Posted 17 March 2018 - 08:09 PM

I would keep it at 95% to prevent packet loss. Also this assumes you are the ONLY one and NO other devices are accessing the internet at all. If there are, remember to include this in your calculations. There are other factors that will need to be calculated as well. Such as the "bit rate, frame rate, frame size, sound quality and variations in user connection speed". Are you streaming Twitch or Kodi? FYI I am not all that familiar with streaming video requirements I have never had to do the calculations. I can only surmise how your network will react to being saturated (or maxing out your bandwidth).


Chad Mockensturm 

Systems and Network Engineer

Certified CompTia Network +, A +





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users