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Sending Personal Info on Facebook Groups


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4 replies to this topic

#1 Kolby-kun

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Posted 11 March 2018 - 03:11 AM

Hey guys, I'm wondering if it's safe to send my personal details to a group admin including my signature to a facebook admin that handles the group that acts as a marketplace so it's used to identify I'm a legit seller.

 

I'm kind of paranoid(of the internet), what do you think?



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#2 mjd420nova

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Posted 11 March 2018 - 11:57 AM

I'm very paranoid of the internet, so much so that when buying something on line I will go to the local Walmart and buy a gift card so I don't have to put my banking info on the web.  It would only take one hacker of a site to clean out my account.



#3 MichelleAlese

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Posted 16 April 2018 - 03:50 PM

If you could avoid it, I would. It's important to be really careful about sharing personal info on the web, you never know who may see it. I try to be cautious when possible. 



#4 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 16 April 2018 - 06:06 PM

It's all very well being paranoid on the internet but you have to weigh the risks against the benefits.

 

If you wish to be identified as a legit seller in this group then it depends on what information has been asked for versus the benefits you gain as being recognised as 'legit'.

 

If you are being asked for a complete life history and you are only making say £100/year from sales then it is probably not worth it, if you are being asked for your name, address, email and possibly mobile phone number then that would seem a reasonable amount of information to give in almost any case. I have to give that information to buy a ferry ticket !

 

Remember your name and address is not classified information, and your email address is not exactly a state secret either. You could of course always set up a seperate email account just for trading purposes.

 

Chris Cosgrove


I am going to be away until about the 22nd October. Time on-line will be reduced and my internet access may be limited. PMs may not be replied to as quickly as normal !


#5 britechguy

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Posted 16 April 2018 - 06:33 PM

I'm very paranoid of the internet, so much so that when buying something on line I will go to the local Walmart and buy a gift card so I don't have to put my banking info on the web.  It would only take one hacker of a site to clean out my account.

 

I suggest you take a look at how credit and debit card data is processed at points of sale (as in, brick and mortar stores) these days.  It's sent out over the internet just like it is if you enter it from home.  It may be transmitted in a slightly different format, but anyone who's hacking for credit card information is far more likely to go for the big jackpot on a large merchant's or processor's servers than ever to try to get this information one computer at a time.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 





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