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Sporadic WHEA Logger Warnings at Startup


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#1 plat1098

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Posted 10 March 2018 - 08:22 PM

Hello.  Since the Fall Creators Update came out, the machine has had issues at startup, among which are clusters of 4 DCOM errors (which I cannot take ownership of) and periodically 1 or more WHEA Logger corrected hardware warnings.  An example is below

 

Attached File  WHEA.PNG   68.13KB   0 downloads

 

You can tell startup is affected (delayed) but proceeds as usual.  No bluescreens so no dumpfiles.  I want to know why these are occurring and if there is anything more I can do.  The device ID A118 appears to correspond to PCI Express Root Port #9 and involves the NVMe--if not, please correct me.  

 

What I've done so far:  reseat the NVMe,  clean installation of Windows 10 v. 1709 (3x), installation of latest Intel chipset and Serio I/O (3x).  Latest BIOS (no Spectre/Meltdown one yet). The # of these WHEA Logger warnings can fluctuate from 1 to over 20 but don't occur at every startup.  Fast startup and BIOS Quick Boot are both disabled.  I've found that booting machine before Internet connection is fully established results in zero DCOM errors and zero WHEA. 

 

http://speccy.piriform.com/results/3nhWaKuVdYKtZNfT1C2LEEd

 

Chkdsk /r showed no errors or bad blocks.  The NVMe is about 3 months old.  RAM is 2x8 GB Ballistix Sport DDR4 @2400MHz. Speccy does not detect two temperatures so here is a snip of the missing motherboard and drive information:

 

 Attached File  hwinfo snip.PNG   38.37KB   0 downloadsAttached File  crystaldiskinfo.PNG   62.92KB   0 downloads

 

There are two temps for the NVMe in HWInfo snip.   

 

The issue isn't really dire but any information is gratefully received.  Thanks!


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#2 HyperHenry

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Posted 10 March 2018 - 11:12 PM

Your PSU is bad. The rates should be within 5%. Your 12V rate was 7.35V for example. If you supply a Sysnative report that is requested in the posting instructions for the forum we can take a look at the DMP files and see what else might be going on. Here is the link https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/576314/blue-screen-of-death-bsod-posting-instructions-windows-10-81-8-7-vista/



#3 plat1098

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Posted 11 March 2018 - 04:14 AM

Hello @HyperHenry.  I was afraid of that, seeing as this is the same generic power supply Lenovo supplied originally.  OK.  Seeing as I have a new 650 watt EVGA Super Nova PSU gathering dust in the closet, I might as well use it.  I was hoping I could blame it on the Fall Creators Update as the machine ran the first CU flawlessly.  Once the Fall CU came around, numerous software and hardware conflicts happened and persist to this day.  I read the posting instructions but as I said before, there are no BSODs or system freezes so there would be no dump files to examine. Nevertheless, here is the requested zip folder. I disabled a small security program to run it but it still says wscript host is disabled, contact your administrator.  Hopefully, the info you need is still in there.  

 

Thank you for the voltage info, it is not surprising.  CPUID and SpeedFan didn't provide any useful info on voltages.  

 

 

Attached File  SysnativeFileCollectionApp.zip   390.38KB   2 downloads

 

 

plat


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#4 bwv848

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Posted 12 March 2018 - 09:59 PM

Your PSU is bad. The rates should be within 5%. Your 12V rate was 7.35V for example. If you supply a Sysnative report that is requested in the posting instructions for the forum we can take a look at the DMP files and see what else might be going on. Here is the link https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/576314/blue-screen-of-death-bsod-posting-instructions-windows-10-81-8-7-vista/

Henry, please keep in mind that there are occasional erroneous readings by software programs, so "bad" is a little bit too strong. Always confirm that the voltages in the BIOS tell a similar story before jumping to any conclusions. In general, a PSU test would be the best test for confident and experienced users (although still never 100% accurate).


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#5 plat1098

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Posted 15 March 2018 - 04:05 PM

OK, since I don't have an external voltage monitoring device and wouldn't know how to use it anyway, I went looking for another software.  So, I got the AIDA64 Extreme trial version (expensive, kind of), and unfortunately it only displays the 3 and 5 volt readings, which are right on point. No 12v in the trial, but unless that's a major requirement, it's OK. Something is dinging the NVMe at startup so I reset the machine again.  Like many with nuisance issues in the Fall CU, I'll grin and bear it until the Spring CU.

:killcomp:  

 

Attached File  aida64.PNG   53.36KB   0 downloads

 

Thanks all, @bwv848--you were right.   :) 

 

plat


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#6 HyperHenry

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Posted 15 March 2018 - 04:19 PM

You should be able to check them in the BIOS BWV848 suggested. I should have thought about that too.



#7 plat1098

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Posted 17 March 2018 - 04:53 AM

Yes, I combed thru BIOS in the past, so based on info here, I accessed it again looking for voltage info to magically appear and it's nowhere in any field--just "manual," "enable" and "disable" functions for various things like EIST, turbo mode, etc.  Hmmm.  I guess a voltmeter is your best bet in a situation like this--it was surprising that HWInfo64 voltage readings were so off compared to AIDA64's.  Speccy, unfortunately, has never been able to capture the complete picture on either of my Lenovo machines. I ran a few  "diagnostic" hardware readings and machine always passes, including the motherboard tests.   No abrupt shutdowns or crashes to date. Furmark was stable at avg 201 fps/83 deg C for over 30 minutes--a failing PSU would have manifested itself there, I think.  No dust or anything. 

 

Guess I'll wait and see what the big upgrade in a few weeks brings.  Thanks.   :) 


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#8 plat1098

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Posted 13 April 2018 - 04:16 PM

I resolved this, it was actually very simple.  I let some days go by to make sure it was resolved.  I'd already determined the offending component was the NVM-e--by searching vendor id and device id shown in the event viewer (here 8086 is Intel/ 0xA118 is Sunrise Point PCI-e Express Root Port 9).  After the WHEA warnings started showing up randomly, not just at startup, I went to the Samsung site and there was a driver and controller available for the EVO 960, which I could get without having to install additional manuf. software.  Never thought I would need a third party driver for this storage device (looks like a metallic stick of gum), but apparently that did the trick.  I learned to never ignore even one WHEA logger warning.  

 

So there you are.   :) 


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#9 HyperHenry

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Posted 14 April 2018 - 04:24 PM

Thank you for sharing the fix.






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