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1 computer 2 OS: SSD 1 Linux. SSD 2 Windows. Can it be done


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#1 frldyz

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Posted 10 March 2018 - 06:04 AM

Built a great computer a couple years back.

Way overkill for my purposes ( online browsing, forums and youtube ).  

 

I ditched my Win 7 a few mos. back and installed Linux Mint.  I love it.  This OS is fantastic for newbs. ...and FAST!

 

Anyways...

I've never been much of a gamer and honestly have not played a PC game in ages.

But....

I always have the best intentions to do so.

 

Here is my question:

1).  On a separate  SSD can I install Win. 10?   In the event I ever want to game and play games that are Win. compatabile?

 

*I'm not interested in running the app. "wine"

** I'm not interested in partitioning my Linux SSD

*** This 2nd SSD that I want to run Win.10 on will not even be hooked up.  I will just have it in my desk and if I ever do want to play a Win. game I'll just disconnect my Linux SSD and connect my Win 10 SSD.

 

2) And if this is possible.  Is there any harm in disconnecting my Linux SSD and reconnecting my Linux SSD after I'm done with the Win. 10 SSD?

*I'm not sure if I will loose any data or apps. I've installed when I disconnect and reconnect?

 

Thank you

 

ALERT:  Newb. here. 


Edited by hamluis, 10 March 2018 - 07:02 AM.
Moved from Internal Hardware to Disk Mgmt - Hamluis.


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#2 Hareen

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Posted 10 March 2018 - 06:21 AM

That's an interesting point.

 

You will run only one SSD at a time here.

 

So it might be fine, actually.

 

I am waiting for the elders to speak up.



#3 DavisMcCarn

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Posted 10 March 2018 - 06:50 AM

You would be advised to have two identical SSD's; but, as long as you shut the PC down to swap the drives, you should be fine.


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#4 buddy215

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Posted 10 March 2018 - 06:53 AM

It would make more sense to install both SSDs. But if you do that you should remove the Linux SSD until Windows is installed

on the new one to avoid any accidents or problems. Then install the Linux SSD and repair grub that is on the Linux SSD. It will

then give you the option to boot into Windows or Linux.

 

Knowing how often Windows 10 is updated and how huge some of the updates are, I think it would be a real pain to have the Windows

SSD uninstalled.


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#5 frldyz

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Posted 10 March 2018 - 12:40 PM

It would make more sense to install both SSDs. But if you do that you should remove the Linux SSD until Windows is installed

on the new one to avoid any accidents or problems. Then install the Linux SSD and repair grub that is on the Linux SSD. It will

then give you the option to boot into Windows or Linux.

 

Knowing how often Windows 10 is updated and how huge some of the updates are, I think it would be a real pain to have the Windows

SSD uninstalled.

 

So:1) So I can install Win. 10 on a separate SSD and use it on my Linux computer?

 

1a)  As long as during the install my Linux SSD is diconnected?

2a)  If I do this when I want to  use my Win. 10 SSD on this computer I just need to have the power turned off and disconnect my Linux SSD.

 

This will work?



#6 buddy215

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Posted 10 March 2018 - 12:51 PM

What I'm suggesting is to have both recognized at bootup and then you select which to run.

 

Food for thought....Dual Boot Windows 10 and Linux Ubuntu on Separate Hard Drives - Ask Ubuntu

 

I am going to ask that this be moved to a more appropriate forum where all the Linux geniuses hang out and

you will be given the best advice.


Edited by buddy215, 10 March 2018 - 12:53 PM.

“Every atom in your body came from a star that exploded and the atoms in your left hand probably came from a different star than your right hand. It really is the most poetic thing I know about physics...you are all stardust.”Lawrence M. Krauss
A 1792 U.S. penny, designed in part by Thomas Jefferson and George Washington, reads “Liberty Parent of Science & Industry.”

#7 Orange Blossom

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Posted 10 March 2018 - 01:04 PM

And I've now moved it to the Linux forum.  Topic link remains the same.


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#8 frldyz

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Posted 10 March 2018 - 01:14 PM

What I'm suggesting is to have both recognized at bootup and then you select which to run.
 
Food for thought....Dual Boot Windows 10 and Linux Ubuntu on Separate Hard Drives - Ask Ubuntu
 
I am going to ask that this be moved to a more appropriate forum where all the Linux geniuses hang out and
you will be given the best advice.

 
How can I move it?

Edited by Orange Blossom, 10 March 2018 - 01:16 PM.
Deleted echo. ~ OB


#9 Orange Blossom

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Posted 10 March 2018 - 01:16 PM

I already have moved it.


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#10 MadmanRB

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Posted 10 March 2018 - 01:23 PM

Yes this is possible, linux or windows can be installed on two drives and still be able to be dual booted.

The only caveat is if you install windows after linux you will indeed have to disconnect the linux drive (as windows is greedy at its bootloader) and then you will have to enter this comand on linux:

 

sudo update-grub

 

in a terminal

 

this will; make grub (the linux bootloader) able to detect windows.

 

 

but other than that it should go swimmingly


Edited by MadmanRB, 10 March 2018 - 01:24 PM.

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#11 pcpunk

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Posted 10 March 2018 - 04:04 PM

Why would grub need to have anything done to it at all, these will be on two different drives?  If the computer supports booting more than one drive, that will be determined by the Boot Order in BIOS, or the Temp Boot Options.


Edited by pcpunk, 10 March 2018 - 04:07 PM.

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#12 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 10 March 2018 - 05:39 PM

@ pcpunk #11

 

Possibly because most of us are lazy and having Grub offer boot options within a second or two of hitting the start button is easier than going into BIOS or Advanced boot options to pick your drive and OS.

 

My desktop is set up to dual boot with Win 7 on one 500GB drive and Mint on another 500 GB drive. There are also 2 x 1TB drives for storage. Win 7 has been on this computer for a long time and when I decided to try my hand at Linux I just added a spare 500 GB drive I had lying around. the install was straight forward, with a bit of care taken that I did not format any of the other three drives already on the computer, a mistake I had made on an earlier attempt. Grub makes the boot choice easy - If I want Linux I need to do nothing, if I want Windows then four clicks on the down arrow key and it starts up.

 

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#13 pcpunk

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Posted 10 March 2018 - 05:47 PM

Chris, this works even if the bootloader is installed on the Linux Drive?  I thought this would only work if the Bootloader was installed on the First Windows Drive?


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#14 MadmanRB

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Posted 10 March 2018 - 07:22 PM

Chris, this works even if the bootloader is installed on the Linux Drive?  I thought this would only work if the Bootloader was installed on the First Windows Drive?

 

 

You can bypass this.

 

This is why i suggested updating grub as it will just add windows into the grub boot screen.

Its a simple command and works wonders, beats going into boot drive selection all the time, far simpler.


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#15 Mike_Walsh

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Posted 10 March 2018 - 07:58 PM

Even Puppy's Grub4DOS (essentially the old 'legacy' GRUB, from before GRUB2) will do this. 

 

Even if you run only Puppy (like I do), Grub4DOS still makes an entry for Windoze by default; the path is there for the Windoze NTLDR, should it ever be wanted. Before going 'all-Puppy', I ran XP alongside 4 or 5 Puppies for nearly 2 years. And Linux bootloaders are more versatile than their Windoze counterparts; you don't have to run 'em from the MBR.....you can even run them from any partition's 'volume boot record' (more commonly known as the 'partition boot sector', or PBR.). So long as you point the relevant lines of your bootloader in the right direction, it honestly doesn't matter where on the drive it is physically situated. 

 

It is only a set of directions, when all's said & done.....although the Master Boot Record is normally utilised for the simple reason that most industry-standard BIOS programs are set-up to look there first, in the initial 512K of the first sector, before looking anywhere else.

 

-----------------------------------------------------

 

Anyway, Chris is right. Most of us are lazy; why arse around with the BIOS every time, when the Boot Menu will give you the choice? And to my mind, using a properly set-up Boot Menu is a far more technically satisfying solution.

 

Currently, I have 10 Pups on a 500 GB WD Caviar 'Blue'.....and Anti-X 16.1 on a 32GB KingSpec SSD. Anti-X boots via the Puppy Grub4DOS bootloader; I have an entry in Grub4DOS which 'chains' into Anti-X's GRUB2. Like this:-

 

# Full installed Linux


title AntiX 16.1 (sdb1/boot) 
  chainloader (hd1)+1 
  rootnoverify (hd1)

When I installed Anti-X, I disconnected the main drive, so the LiveCD only 'saw' the smaller SSD. Hence, it installed GRUB2 to that drive. I did things this way, knowing that it was extremely easy to 'chain' into other boot-loaders, even on other drives, from Grub4DOS itself.....and also because I firmly believe, and maintain, that GRUB2 is a bloated, excessively over-complicated monstrosity of a thing which, to my mind, has no real place in the elegantly simple set-up of your average Linux distro (compared to Windoze, that is). Why construct a simple, robust OS, then burden it down with summat like that?

 

I still maintain Grub4DOS is one of the most versatile boot-loaders I've ever come across.....and Pup's version is specially 'tweaked' to search 'two-deep' inside a partition's top-level directories for kernels as well. Why on earth the Linux community abandoned it in favour of its offspring I shall never, ever understand.

 

(I know this doesn't directly answer the OP's original query.....but it does serve to illustrate how versatile most boot-loaders really are. They usually have many more options than your average Joe will ever be aware of. All it takes is a wee bit of research; as with so much 'tech' stuff, the answers are out there on the 'net; you just have to 'dig' a little!)

 

That's what a 'search engine' is for...

 

 

Mike.  :wink:


Edited by Mike_Walsh, 10 March 2018 - 08:37 PM.

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