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Ripple Distortion with new Samsung Monitor


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#1 Lasagna_Smoothie

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Posted 09 March 2018 - 11:39 PM

Hello,

 

I recently purchased a Samsung CHG90 144Hz gaming monitor.  I've been very pleased with it, however, I'v encountered a rather strange problem.  I've noticed periodic horizontal distortions that move up the screen, creating a sort of "ripple" effect.  I've recorded a video of the issue, it can be most clearly seen at about the 20 second mark in the upper left hand corner:

 

 

Initially, I assumed it had something to do with screen tearing.  While this monitor has free-sync, I'm using an Nvidia graphics card, so I can't avail myself of this technology.  However, even when I enable vertical-sync in the in game options, I still notice this issue.  I assume if it were a form of screen tearing v-sync would solve this issue?  I've noticed this problem in a number of different games (not just the racing game I recorded), and I've only observed it when the screen is showing moving imagery.  The monitor is connected through a display port connection on the graphics card.  I've tried all three display port outlets on my graphics card, and they all exhibit the same issue.  Any suggestions on what might be causing this issue would be hugely appreciated.  Thanks!

 

System specs:

Intel i7 5820K

Aus ROG Strix GTX 1080ti

16GB Ram

Windows 10

 

Best,

 

Ryan


Edited by Lasagna_Smoothie, 10 March 2018 - 08:31 AM.


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#2 OldPhil

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Posted 10 March 2018 - 06:50 AM

Please give full system specs it helps others in assessing problems.


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#3 Platypus

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Posted 10 March 2018 - 07:57 AM

What method did you use for the recording?
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#4 Lasagna_Smoothie

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Posted 10 March 2018 - 08:12 AM

Please give full system specs it helps others in assessing problems.

 

Thanks for your response.  I've amended my original post.  Please let me know of you need any additional info.


What method did you use for the recording?

 

I simply used my Samsung S6 smartphone.  Sorry about the less than excellent quality.  



#5 Platypus

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Posted 10 March 2018 - 08:35 AM

It's just that I'm having difficulty identifying any visual artifact that answers the description. There's some aliasing in the fence that seems normal...
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#6 mjd420nova

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Posted 11 March 2018 - 12:01 PM

I saw the effect and have seen something like it before.  It was caused by a nearby radar installation.  The effect happened every six seconds and was able to coordinate it with the sweep of a radar dish at the nearby airport.



#7 Lasagna_Smoothie

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Posted 12 March 2018 - 09:13 PM

It's just that I'm having difficulty identifying any visual artifact that answers the description. There's some aliasing in the fence that seems normal...

 

Thanks for weighing in.  If you look closely, you should see the distortion appear at the twenty second mark on the left side of the screen.  It appears at about mid screen and moves upward in a ripple until it reaches the top of the monitor.  I understand the footage isn't the greatest.  I'll see about getting a better recording.  Thanks again.



#8 Lasagna_Smoothie

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Posted 12 March 2018 - 09:15 PM

I saw the effect and have seen something like it before.  It was caused by a nearby radar installation.  The effect happened every six seconds and was able to coordinate it with the sweep of a radar dish at the nearby airport.

 

Thanks for your insight, it's appreciated.  I'm in the middle of the woods in New Hampshire, so unfortunately I don't think radar interference is the culprit.  Also, the monitor's in a basement, so it should be well shielded from outside interference.  There's also no regularity to the distortion, it seems to come and go and random intervals.  Nonetheless, thanks for the idea.



#9 OldPhil

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Posted 13 March 2018 - 04:10 AM

Are you using an UPS, trying to rule out something in the electric supply coming in to your home.  The quick distortion is pretty easy to see I have looked at it a bunch of times.  If you are using an UPS it would filter out a ripple in the current coming into your setup!

 

Phil


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#10 Platypus

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Posted 13 March 2018 - 04:52 AM

If you are in an area that still uses control tones on the mains supply to switch off-peak in and out, that can be one factor like OldPhil is indicating. If that's what it is, they can be difficult to attenuate fully. A UPS is certainly one way, as long as it is a full-time converter - the other type that detects loss of mains and cuts in the UPS in a few milliseconds relies on whatever interference suppression is fitted to attenuate frequencies riding on the line. That won't have much effect on control tones, a very effective mains scrubber is needed to deal with them.


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#11 mightywiz

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Posted 13 March 2018 - 11:07 AM

yes a UPS with a built in power conditioner could do the job. 

 

usually what your referring to 60Hz hum in the power line.   and visually you will see this in a monitor as the bar move from the bottom of the screen to the top.

 

other things that can cause this effect are florescent lighting in the same room along with monitor refresh rates, try changing the refresh rate of the monitor in settings.



#12 Lasagna_Smoothie

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Posted 13 March 2018 - 07:22 PM

Are you using an UPS, trying to rule out something in the electric supply coming in to your home.  The quick distortion is pretty easy to see I have looked at it a bunch of times.  If you are using an UPS it would filter out a ripple in the current coming into your setup!

 

Phil

 

Thanks so much for weighing in.  To answer your question, I have my computer hooked up to a cyberpower UPS, however, the monitor is currently just plugged into a run of the mill surge protector.  It didn't occur to me this may be an issue with the quality of the power.  I'll try hooking the monitor up to my UPS and if that improves the situation.  Thanks!



#13 Lasagna_Smoothie

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Posted 13 March 2018 - 07:29 PM

If you are in an area that still uses control tones on the mains supply to switch off-peak in and out, that can be one factor like OldPhil is indicating. If that's what it is, they can be difficult to attenuate fully. A UPS is certainly one way, as long as it is a full-time converter - the other type that detects loss of mains and cuts in the UPS in a few milliseconds relies on whatever interference suppression is fitted to attenuate frequencies riding on the line. That won't have much effect on control tones, a very effective mains scrubber is needed to deal with them.

 

Thanks so much for that response.  I can tell you really know your stuff when it comes to electrical issues.  I own a cyberpower CP1000PFCLCD PFC sinewave UPS system.  I'm not sure if this qualifies as a full-time converter or not.  It does feature automatic voltage regulation, for whatever that's worth.  It's just strange that I've only encountered this issue with my new Samsung monitor.  Prior to this I was using an Acer X34 and I never noticed this sort of distortion.  Regardless, thank you and I'll try plugging the monitor into my UPS and see if that solves the problem.



#14 Lasagna_Smoothie

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Posted 13 March 2018 - 07:31 PM

yes a UPS with a built in power conditioner could do the job. 

 

usually what your referring to 60Hz hum in the power line.   and visually you will see this in a monitor as the bar move from the bottom of the screen to the top.

 

other things that can cause this effect are florescent lighting in the same room along with monitor refresh rates, try changing the refresh rate of the monitor in settings.

 

Thanks a ton for your reply.  I'll definitely give the UPS option a try.  I don't have any florescent lighting in this particular room, so I don't think that's the culprit - good thought though.  Messing with the monitor refresh rate is a good idea as well, although I'd like to avoid restricting the refresh rate if at all possible.  One of the things that attracted me to this particular monitor is the very high 144hz refresh rate.  Thanks again!



#15 Platypus

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Posted 14 March 2018 - 02:20 AM

The refresh rate can be used as just a test to help prove matters, e.g. locking to 60HZ could show if the effect is an optical effect caused by interaction with 60Hz lighting. The human eye can see a flutter at the difference frequency, up to about 20Hz. If using 60HZ refresh stops it happening, that's a possible cause. If that's the cause, of course, it would also not occur under daylight when there is no 60Hz artificial lighting.

Another diagnostic would be to use the system in a different location. If the problem doesn't show when used on a different mains supply, that could support the suspicion that it's something on your mains.

Edited by Platypus, 14 March 2018 - 02:23 AM.

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