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Screwed up partition status


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9 replies to this topic

#1 dahermit

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Posted 07 March 2018 - 10:32 PM

I had a problem with my Windows 10 update (possibly caused by a power outage).  I tried many different remedies.  Unfortunately, I changed the drive to "Active" and it would not boot anymore.  However, I had a clone drive sitting in a USB docking station ready to go.  I opened the case and swapped drives.  Back in business.  However, I put the faulty drive in the docking station and cloned the new drive to it, which I think really screwed it up.

 

What I need is a step-by-step procedure on how to get the new clone (the hard drive that was in my computer I screwed-up) back to where it will boot.  I have tried to find how to "Un-Active" the partition, but that action does not seem to be available.  

 

So, how can I fix the drive so I can be assured of having a bootable clone at the ready in my USB cradle?

 

On the attached screenshot, the working drive in my computer is "Disk 0".  The nonfunctioning disk is "Disk 1"

Attached Files


Edited by dahermit, 07 March 2018 - 10:34 PM.


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#2 zack61w

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Posted 08 March 2018 - 12:09 PM

Hi,

 

Try using CMD to make an partition inactive, follow the commands:

 

  1.  Open up a command prompt and type DISKPART.
  2. Type LIST DISK
  3. Type SELECT DISK n (where n is the number of the  drive)
  4. Type LIST PARTITION
  5. Type SELECT PARTITION n (where n is the number of the active partition you wish to make inactive)
  6. Type INACTIVE
  7. Type EXIT to exit DISKPART
  8. Type EXIT again to exit the command prompt
  9. Reboot

Edited by hamluis, 08 March 2018 - 12:23 PM.


#3 dahermit

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Posted 08 March 2018 - 06:24 PM

I followed your instructions...no joy.  After rebooting and running Disk Management to look to see if there had been any changes, there were not...everything was the same as my screenshot above.

 

I am wondering if I should just treat the drive as a used drive and delete the partitions and then re-create them.  I did that once (bought a new drive, formatted it, partitioned it,  AOMEI Partition Assistant), but I have waxed old and don't remember how to do it, not sure of the sequence.



#4 JohnC_21

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Posted 08 March 2018 - 06:33 PM

The 100MB System Reserved Partition must be marked Active in order for Windows to Boot. The Windows 10 install media allows you to select Repair and do a Automatic Repair. It may take up to three attempts to do the repair. You can also do a reset with the option to keep your files but this required you to reinstall all your programs.

 

https://www.winhelp.us/repair-your-computer-in-windows-10.html#repairdvd



#5 dahermit

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Posted 09 March 2018 - 06:56 AM

The 100MB System Reserved Partition must be marked Active in order for Windows to Boot. The Windows 10 install media allows you to select Repair and do a Automatic Repair. It may take up to three attempts to do the repair. You can also do a reset with the option to keep your files but this required you to reinstall all your programs.

The drive I am having trouble with...the one sitting in my USB dock, has the 100MB System Reserved Partition marked active (see the screenshot in my first post).  Unlike the drive running my computer correctly now, It does not have the word "system" in its status. 

 

At this point, I do not need to save any of the data or programs on that drive, I just want to use it as a clone host.  But, when I clone my drive to it, it does not change the "status" of either the System Reserved partition or the Primary Partition (Disk 1 Partition 1) to: "Boot, Page File, Crash Dump, Primary Partition"  



#6 JohnC_21

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Posted 09 March 2018 - 08:07 AM

Okay, I understand the problem now. What program did you use to clone the drive? 



#7 dahermit

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Posted 09 March 2018 - 08:13 AM

I use Macrium Reflect to do my clones.



#8 old rocker

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Posted 09 March 2018 - 08:28 AM

dahermit, JohnC_21

 

Hope it's ok that I stick my nose in here for a minute...
 
I would give GNOME Partition Editor a try. Don't be afraid to refer to the Tutorials section for assistance. I have found this utility quite useful since it's inception.
 
 
Very easy to manage flags or experiment managing flags on a particular device. (Set as Boot, Set Hidden etc.)
 
Hope this helps
 
Old Rocker


#9 JohnC_21

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Posted 09 March 2018 - 08:32 AM

Did you wipe the drive before the clone? Also because both drives are the same have you attempted to do a sector by sector clone although this will take a long time. Did you do the clone inside of Windows? I would do the clone outside of Windows using the Macrium Boot disk or USB. After the clone remove the drive from the USB adapter before attempting to boot. After booting attach the cloned drive back to the adapter and see if the clone was successful.

 

Other cloning software that may work is 

Aomei Backupper Standard

Easeus Todo Standard.

 

Where a clone has failed people have reported success using Partition Wizard. If another clone fails with a wiped drive or sector by sector clone these are the steps for Partition Wizard. All steps are virtual until Apply is clicked.

 

https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/download/minitool-partition-wizard-free/

 

First Wipe the drive using Partition Wizard.

 

https://www.partitionwizard.com/help/wipe-disk.html

 

Copy each partition to the drive to be cloned. Start with the System Reserved Partition and work to the right. You may get an error. If that happens it could be due to bad sectors on the drive.

 

https://www.partitionwizard.com/help/copy-partition.html

 

Old Rocker, Gparted works well to but I believe Partition Wizard is a little easier to use for Windows users. It also allows partition copying but I believe there is more missing in the cloned drive than just the boot flag. Being marked active the System Reserve Partition of both disks already has the boot flag enabled.

 

FYI. I to use disk images backed up to an external drive vs doing a cloned drive unless the clone is a one and done used for moving from a smaller drive to a larger drive for HDD to SSD. You can have multiple disk images on the external. Each created after a few program changes/installs or major updates to the OS. For instance, creating an image after the monthly security updates or the Windows 10 major upgrades that happen twice a year. Using the booting media I can restore any image and an additional benefit is images can be both incremental or differential, decreasing the size of the backed up image. If the drive fails, I would install the new one, boot the Macrium restore disk/USB and restore the image. I guess it's just a personal preference.


Edited by JohnC_21, 09 March 2018 - 08:43 AM.


#10 Mason21

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Posted 09 March 2018 - 05:05 PM

Here is a very powerful way to clean and ready a drive using powershell. I use this method every time I want to re-install on a drive. 

 

Powershell

1. Get-Disk   (Locate your disk ...disk 0 is used in this illustration. You will need to change this number to the number of your drive)
 
2. Get-Disk 0 | Clear-Disk -RemoveData
 
3. Initialize-Disk 0
 
4. New-Partition -DiskNumber 0 -UseMaximumSize | Format-Volume -FileSystem NTFS -NewFileSystemLabel Archive
 
5. Get-Partition -DiskNumber 0 | Set-Partition -NewDriveLetter Z

 

 






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