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I'm looking for help with Administrator account issues


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#1 artshehoo

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Posted 06 March 2018 - 06:43 PM

Sorry, my title is not very specific.

Here's my problem in more detail:

 

I'm having trouble with running Spotify on my computer (Windows 10).

It seems that every time I run it, it has to install an update, which I don't normally mind, and I have to run it as Administrator.

But after the last update, I can't open the program.

When I try, I get the error message, "This app has been blocked by your system administrator. Contact your system administrator for more info."

If I log in as administrator, I get the same message! WTF! (btw, I'm the only user of this computer)

How do I "contact the administrator" when I AM the administrator? Why would I get that message while I'm logged in as the administrator?

This doesn't make any sense to me and I haven't been able to find any clear answers yet from google searches.

 

Can anyone help?



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#2 britechguy

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Posted 06 March 2018 - 07:27 PM

You haven't been specific about what you have tried, but see the results from:

 

             https://duckduckgo.com/?q=Spotify+%22blocked+by+your+system+administrator%22&t=hg&atb=v91-1&ia=web

 

The first article has quite a few potential solutions.

 

Just because you are logged in under an account with admin privileges does not mean that anything you attempt to run is likely to run with elevated privileges.  This has been the case since UAC came on the scene.  This is why the, "Run as Administrator," option exists for both PowerShell and Command Prompt and can also be set on shortcuts as well.  This insures said items will run with full admin privileges when invoked.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#3 IttechGyan

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Posted 07 March 2018 - 04:48 AM

Well, after few days of looking around i managed to figure it out. I've had "Take Ownership" scripts from some online tutorial that didn't work for me but i've found where can i do it manually. So right click C: -> Properties -> Security -> >Advanced and under Owner there is Change link. Click it and at the bottom type Administrators and press OK. Under Owner we now have checkbox to copy ownership to everything on that drive, check it and click OK. Wait for a minute or two for process to complete and that's it. Hope it helps someone.



#4 artshehoo

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Posted 07 March 2018 - 10:46 AM

I figured out how to run Spotify as administrator, but it didn't work properly, so I just re-installed it and it's working fine now.

 

But this has brought up another question that I've been curious about for a while:

 

If I am the only user of my computer, should I use the administrator account? Or should I use a user account?

What are the advantages/disadvantages of each?



#5 britechguy

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Posted 07 March 2018 - 11:08 AM

You need to be completely clear about accounts:

 

        1.  There is *the* Administrator account, which is disabled and hidden by default.  There are a very limited number of scenarios where one would or should enable it.  I have never done so on a single machine.

 

        2.  There is a user account with Administrator privileges.  When one is a single user on a machine this is the kind of account that gets set up when Windows is installed.  There always needs to be one account with Admin privileges if you want to be able to install and uninstall software and/or tweak any number of system settings.  You must have admin privilege to change the date and time on a Windows machine.

 

        3.  There can be multiple additional accounts, created via the user account noted in #2, that may also be granted Administrator privileges or be Standard accounts.  If you want the another user to have the sort of abilities to control the system that an Administrator has then you create the account with those privileges.  If you want the other user to pretty much be limited to running the software that's already installed and to only be able to customize settings related strictly to their own user environment then you create a Standard account.

 

[*The* Administrator account is local to the machine in question.  The other accounts may be either Microsoft Account linked user accounts or local user accounts.]

 

Some people choose to keep one account with Administrator privilege and create all other accounts as Standard users, including one for themselves.  The account with admin privileges is only logged in to when a task that requires those privileges is being undertaken (e.g., installing or uninstalling software, repartitioning the disk drive, etc.).  The standard account is used for day to day computing.  This arrangement is the most secure.

 

For myself, particularly with the advent of User Account Control, I find the above arrangement overkill.  I have frequent need to do administrative tasks and do not want to have to switch accounts to do them.  For the majority of things like installing software, particularly third party software, you will get a UAC warning telling you that something is trying to install, needs admin privileges to do so, and you answer Yes or No as to whether it can continue.   That's way more than enough protection for me.

 

The following topics by our own quietman7 are, in my opinion, required reading at the outset for those contemplating what's needed to achieve good security:

 

 
Best practices for safe computing:
 

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#6 artshehoo

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Posted 07 March 2018 - 11:54 AM

Thank you!






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