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Important CD damage info


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8 replies to this topic

#1 OldPhil

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Posted 06 March 2018 - 06:11 PM

A few years ago U read the an scientific expedition lost most of it data due to dampness, the aluminum oxide used in the disks corrodes and kills the disks.  What brought to mind is a buddy just lost a bunch of photos that were in his basement.

 

I have since read that you should carefully brush on a thin coat of clear nail polish on the outer edges, those of you planning long storage should do this just to play safe!!! 


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#2 saw101

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Posted 07 March 2018 - 02:26 AM

I suggest not subjecting optical media, any media really, to the extremes that can cause the problems cited in the first place. I have discs, factory & those I have burned, going back years & all are still in good playable condition. Not a one of them with nail polish on them.   

 

 

I have since read that you should carefully brush on a thin coat of clear nail polish on the outer edges, those of you planning long storage should do this just to play safe!!! 

 

How current is the article you read? Can you provide a link?


I never make the same mistake twice....I always make it 5 or 6 times just to be sure!


#3 OldPhil

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Posted 07 March 2018 - 08:10 AM

My post is strictly informative to help others, helpful items to me are not debatable !


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#4 britechguy

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Posted 07 March 2018 - 11:19 AM

I'm with saw101.   Storage conditions for any media are paramount to it's functional lifespan.  Optical media stored in conditions that are consistently comfortable for human beings have a very, very, very long functional life.   I have several CD-Rs and CD-RWs that are decades old now that still function exactly as they did when first burned.

 

They've been stored in a desk drawer, indoors, with the same climate controls that keep the residents of the house comfortable.  For a good chunk of the spring, parts of summer, and early fall that means no artificial climate control.

 

I hasten to add that I doubt that a coating of clear (or even colored) fingernail polish on the outer edge of optical media would do any harm.  It's quite far enough away from the end of the readable area.   I have no idea if it has any benefit, though, and doubt that it would unless the media were stored in less than ideal conditions.  In addition, depending on the maker, there were lots and lots of writable optical media where the carrier layer is right on the top of the disk itself.  I have an old Hi-Val brand CD-R right in front of me that's no longer functional because it was stored where things were "sliding along" its upper surface when a vehicle was in motion and where there are now "blank areas" where the reflective media scratched off.  (And, yes, they were ultra cheap and intended as disposable.)  I have a number of others from this batch which were stored with a bit more care and they still work just fine.


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#5 OldPhil

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Posted 07 March 2018 - 11:40 AM

Why there is any debate mystifies me what you two veterans miss is that the uninformed need a little guidance to make their computing life easier.
 
It is said so often one is entitled to their opinion but not to their own facts!

In the link below you will notice in the disk break down manufacturers use lacquer to seal the edges, I use clear nail polish basically e thicker version of the same.

https://www.clir.org/pubs/reports/pub121/sec3/

Edited by OldPhil, 07 March 2018 - 01:17 PM.

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#6 britechguy

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Posted 07 March 2018 - 12:10 PM

OldPhil,

 

        With regard to media, optical or otherwise, the best and only advice I would give anyone is to store it in a climate controlled environment that is comfortable for a human being.  That is generally more than enough.  It goes without saying that one should store them such that they are not in contact with each other or other objects, whether in plastic cases or protective sleeves of paper or some other material.

 

         Everything you have offered with regard to "sealing the edges" is anecdotal and, thus, *opinion*.  

 

         Others, who have decades of professional experience, have every right to offer their own, even if it disagrees with yours and have done so in a very non-confrontational manner.  


Edited by britechguy, 07 March 2018 - 12:14 PM.

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (my website address is in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

    Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
             ~ Lauren Bacall
              

 


#7 JohnC_21

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Posted 07 March 2018 - 12:38 PM

Brian,

I still have about 25 or 30 Hi-Val CDs that I haven't burnt yet. I never had a problem with them. I don't think they sell them anymore unless you find something on Ebay.



#8 saw101

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Posted 07 March 2018 - 02:20 PM

Library of Congress in race to preserve CDs - Aug 2014 News Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eQ0h33DGtTI

 

Archiving with M-Disc [M-Disc is writable DVD & Blu-Ray media for longer-lasting archives] Sep 18, 2016: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pekgrP-v5O0


Edited by saw101, 07 March 2018 - 02:53 PM.

I never make the same mistake twice....I always make it 5 or 6 times just to be sure!


#9 Joe C

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Posted 10 March 2018 - 10:56 PM

Storage in important. I had a cd disk that only had half the aluminum on it because it was between some books with it sticking 1/2 way out. This disk was exposed to temps in my garage which ranged from -10 or more in the winter to +90 in the summer. It only took a couple of years to create this damage. keeping your cd/dvd's in a controlled environment should be done to preserve that most life.






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