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How to Partition for Dual Boot 2 Distros


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#1 LittleGreenDots

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Posted 04 March 2018 - 09:24 AM

I'm brand spanking new with Linux (just installed OpenSUSE) and want to also install Mint Cinnamon. 

 

I find a lot of videos that explain how to partition a Windows machine to also install Linux, but what about starting with the Linux system to partition for another version of Linux? 

 

I found this video but really don't understand it. 

 

https://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/326230/how-to-dual-boot-two-linux-distros

 

I must confess that I am not especially adept at techie tasks.



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#2 Gary R

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Posted 04 March 2018 - 12:13 PM

Is your current disk set up one where OpenSUSE is the only OS on your computer ?

 

If it is, then all you really need to do is boot from your Mint USB, and install it.  When you're asked whether you want it to be a sole install, or installed alongside an existing OS, choose the latter option.  The Mint installer will automatically partition things for you.

 

You'll be asked how much disk space you want to give it.  If 2 is as many OSs as you're ever going to want, then 50% of your drive space will split the drive equally between the 2 OSs, but to be honest you can allocate the 2nd OS (Mint) as much or as little as you want (provided there's enough for it to function properly).

 

Personally though, were I you, I'd get properly familiar with OpenSUSE first, before I started looking to install another OS alongside it.

 

Dual-booting is not without risk, and although the method I've explained usually goes without any major problems, that does not mean it always does. So if you're not technically savvy, then I recommend you avoid dual-booting until you've got a bit more experience.



#3 MadmanRB

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Posted 04 March 2018 - 12:50 PM

Ugh openSUSE is a utterly bad distro in my opinion.

I rather walk to the north pole naked with fish strapped rto my body and poking sticks at polar bears.

I would learn how to use gparted though to learn disk partitioning as its a good idea to learn how to partition disks

 

Gparted is so easy:

 


Edited by MadmanRB, 04 March 2018 - 12:51 PM.

You know you want me baby!

Proud Linux user and dual booter.

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#4 Gary R

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Posted 04 March 2018 - 06:22 PM

If you decide to do things manually, and you want to know a bit more about GParted, I find this article to be useful .... https://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/gparted.html

 

Also this ... https://gparted.org/display-doc.php%3Fname%3Dhelp-manual


Edited by Gary R, 04 March 2018 - 06:36 PM.


#5 Condobloke

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Posted 04 March 2018 - 08:08 PM

A touch off topic.....however.....I find myself agreeing with Madman about opensuse....but I like your second choice..Mint Cinnamon is a dream to use. Relatively short learning curve.

 

Your call of course. I would not be surprised if you endeded up wiping the open suse (after using it for a while)and installing something else there.

 

Personally I would use Gary's approach when installing the second OS.


Edited by Condobloke, 04 March 2018 - 08:08 PM.

Condobloke ...Outback Australian  fed up with Windows antics...??....LINUX IS THE ANSWER....I USE LINUX MINT 18.3  EXCLUSIVELY.

“A man travels the world in search of what he needs and returns home to find it."

It has been said that time heals all wounds. I don't agree. The wounds remain. Time - the mind, protecting its sanity - covers them with some scar tissue and the pain lessens, but it is never gone. Rose Kennedy

 GcnI1aH.jpg

 

 


#6 LittleGreenDots

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Posted 05 March 2018 - 07:25 AM

Change of direction here.  It was impulsive of me to install OpenSUSE.  It looks okay but my original intention was to go with Mint Cinnamon and that's what I want to do.   I have a Lenovo Thinkpad and the F12 key gives me access to the boot option.  I have a copy of Mint I got from the current issue of a Linux magazine and thought I could pop it in after I changed the boot order and let the disk set reformatting into play.  I tried but I think it's more complicated than that as OpenSUSE booted up.  Reformatting looks pretty straight forward.  sudo fdisk /dev/sdc.  If I do that and have the Mint disk in the CD-R, do I have to change any settings?

 

Which is easier, changing the settings to boot off the disk or reformatting the HD and then install from the disk? 



#7 Gary R

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Posted 05 March 2018 - 08:07 AM

There's no need to reformat your drive.

 

If you boot from your "live" Mint disk, and install Mint using that. When the installer asks you how you want Mint to be installed, just choose the option to install it as the sole operating system.

 

If you do that, then the Mint installer will reformat your drive (which will of course remove OpenSUSE), and then install Mint on that drive.



#8 The-Toolman

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Posted 05 March 2018 - 10:48 AM

OpenSUSE definitely not for the novice and not newbie friendly from my experience with it. :nono:

 

Yep let the Linux installer take care of the install process and you will have a better first Linux experience.

 

Plenty of time to learn all that Linux tech stuff later down the road once you have a bit of Linux experience in place.

 

Linux Mint 18 series can't be beat and for the most is hard to beat out of the box. :thumbup2:


I'm grumpy because I can be not because I'm old.

 

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#9 LittleGreenDots

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Posted 05 March 2018 - 01:09 PM

I ran into a problem after installation of Mint.  Everything looked fine but then when I tried to shut down, well, the computer won't shut down.

 

I'll attach an image (rather poor quality, but I think you'll get the idea)

 

I don't know what to do.  When it installed, I selected to install Mint but I didn't get any question about formatting or partitions.

 

Just in case you can't read the text, SQUASHFS errors, sixteen such errors.  I got the disk from a commercial Linux magazine.

 

 



#10 LittleGreenDots

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Posted 05 March 2018 - 01:11 PM

I don't see the pic I shot of the screen.

 

I'll try again.  I forgot to attach.

 

I am trying to learn how Linux works and found an intro video on YouTube by Eli the Computer Guy.  He doesn't recommend Linux as an everyday OS because he says it's quirky. 

 

I just installed a new SSD and I had OpenSUSE installed with no problems.  Reinstall from fresh installation disk?

Attached Files


Edited by LittleGreenDots, 05 March 2018 - 01:16 PM.


#11 The-Toolman

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Posted 05 March 2018 - 02:40 PM

[LittleGreenDots post #10]

I am trying to learn how Linux works and found an intro video on YouTube by Eli the Computer Guy.  He doesn't recommend Linux as an everyday OS because he says it's quirky.

 

I didn't watch the video although I don't understand why that would be said as Linux Mint 18.x series are solid and dependable from my experience.

 

 

The thumbnail you posted in post # 10 is hard to view.

 

If you can open the command terminal in the Linux Distro you have installed and copy and paste inxi -Fxz copy and paste the output it will show your system specs which can be of help to the wiser than I Linux users.


Edited by The-Toolman, 06 March 2018 - 11:37 AM.

I'm grumpy because I can be not because I'm old.

 

The world is what you make of it, if it doesn't fit, you make alterations.

 

Under certain circumstances, profanity provides a relief denied even to prayer.  (Mark Twain)


#12 LittleGreenDots

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Posted 05 March 2018 - 03:43 PM

I have no idea how to open a command line.  The computer was locked up and wouldn't turn off.  I had to remove the battery to shut it down. 



#13 The-Toolman

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Posted 05 March 2018 - 03:56 PM

Linux Mint Cinnamon:
Menu - Administration - Terminal


Linux Mint Mate:
Menu - Terminal


Linux Mint Xfce:
Menu button - System - Xfce Terminal (Terminal Emulator)

 

 

Take a look at this link.

https://sites.google.com/site/easylinuxtipsproject/11

 

 

When doing your install did you have a working internet connection.

 

Wired is the preferred internet choice at the time of install so that needed drivers can be installed at that time.


I'm grumpy because I can be not because I'm old.

 

The world is what you make of it, if it doesn't fit, you make alterations.

 

Under certain circumstances, profanity provides a relief denied even to prayer.  (Mark Twain)


#14 LittleGreenDots

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Posted 05 March 2018 - 04:49 PM

This is very strange.  I had OpenSUSE installed and everything looked good.  As noted, I decided I wanted Mint Cinnamon as my sole OS.  I inserted the Mint Cinnamon disk, and it ran for just a few minutes and I thought I had Mint installed until I tried to shut down, and I got the error msgs I posted.  My computer would not shut down so I removed the battery.  Now when I restart it, the OpenSUSE is loaded.

 

Wouldn't the safest thing to do now to reformat and get OpenSUSE off the drive, and install Mint from the disk I just burned?



#15 The-Toolman

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Posted 05 March 2018 - 05:23 PM

It sounds as though the Linux Mint failed to install for some reason.

 

Install the Linux Mint DVD and and restart the computer making sure to boot from the DVD and install following the prompts and let the Linux Mint installer format and setup / create the partitions to the hard drive.

 

Also make sure to have a wired internet connection that way drivers that are needed can install at the time of install.

 

Follow this guide.

 

https://linuxmint-installation-guide.readthedocs.io/en/latest/

 

 

Actual install.

 

https://linuxmint-installation-guide.readthedocs.io/en/latest/install.html

 

 

 

Remember Let the installer setup and partition the hard drive.

 

 

Nothing fancy just do a standard install and the then after the install reboot the computer and update.


Edited by The-Toolman, 06 March 2018 - 05:09 AM.

I'm grumpy because I can be not because I'm old.

 

The world is what you make of it, if it doesn't fit, you make alterations.

 

Under certain circumstances, profanity provides a relief denied even to prayer.  (Mark Twain)





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