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Best Intro CAD course online?


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#1 Achaemenid

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Posted 03 March 2018 - 01:57 PM

There a number of for-pay CAD courses available, Lynda being one.

 

I would like to hear recommendations from anyone who has taken a course or two about value for money, applicability, etc.

 

I am ultimately interested in architecture but need to do the beginning stuff first.  3D printing would also be interesting.

 

Any suggestions appreciated.



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#2 rp88

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Posted 20 March 2018 - 03:10 PM

As someone who uses certain (sketchup and blender mainly) CAD software a lot I found that I learned it by downloading the programs to have a go with them, starting on projects of things I intended to model, then looking online for text tutorials and youtube vids when I encountered something I needed to do for my project but hadn't yet learned or tried. These two are used for architecture visualisation (generally not for architectural structural stress planning though) and I've personally used them for 3d printing.
Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

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#3 Achaemenid

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Posted 21 March 2018 - 02:39 PM

As someone who uses certain (sketchup and blender mainly) CAD software a lot I found that I learned it by downloading the programs to have a go with them, starting on projects of things I intended to model, then looking online for text tutorials and youtube vids when I encountered something I needed to do for my project but hadn't yet learned or tried. These two are used for architecture visualisation (generally not for architectural structural stress planning though) and I've personally used them for 3d printing.

 

Thanks for answering

 

I started on FreeCAD. Havent looked at Blender yet, but I think Sketchup might be too limited, plus its owned by google.

 

I will take FreeCAD as far as I can. Their own documentation admits it's quicky and won't always work.



#4 rp88

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Posted 24 March 2018 - 04:28 PM

FreeCAD, in theory, should be pretty similar in interface terms and workflow to most of the common industrial (usually autodesk) products, so if you learn it you'd be well prepared for them if you ever find yourself working for someone who uses those. You should hopefully be able to model any geometric form, however complex, that you want using it. But if you want to start making things LOOK nice (you said you were interested in architectural rendering) for still images or video you'll want to learn blender (you can probably convert finished freeCAD models and then import them to blender to animate and render them there.

Sketchup, by the way, is limited but can still model any geometric shape you want (though it's hard for really complex forms like screw threads and worm gears), it'll just need you to think about the shape in different ways until you work out how to construct it line by line. For someone like me with years of experience I find it a nice tool but still turn to other software t make certain kinds of shape that I then import to sketchup, and then export from sketchup to blender for final finishing and rendering. Sketchup thesedays is owned by a company called trimble, google sold it to them in about 2012, but I still use a really old sketchup version so the version I still use is a google product. Thankfully it does not need any cloud or other internet connected elements, you can run it entirely from your local machine, no need to rely on any google (or trimble) servers half a world of slow or failing connections away.

Edited by rp88, 24 March 2018 - 04:32 PM.

Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB




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