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Inquıry re: Wındows Own System Image


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#1 akepe

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Posted 28 February 2018 - 06:10 AM

WINDOWS 7 - 64 bıt

 

Hı All,

 

I use Wındows own Utılıty to take system ımages - Full System Backups - whıch are stored on an external drıve.

 

My questıon ıs thıs :

 

In case of dısk faılure would ı be able to restore such an ımage,on the new ınstalled hard dısk ??

 

Wıthout any problems ?

 

Has anyone here done that successfully ? 

 

Thank you..


Edited by hamluis, 28 February 2018 - 01:39 PM.
Moved from Win 7 to Backup/Imaging - Hamluis.

Windows 7,64 bit  -  Lenovo Laptop 


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#2 dc3

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Posted 28 February 2018 - 11:34 AM

Here is everything you always wanted to know but were afraid to ask about using a full backup to install Windows 7.

 

Back up and restore your PC - Windows Help


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#3 akepe

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Posted 28 February 2018 - 01:20 PM

Thanks for the reply,but the info provided in the link,i already knew,

which unfortunately didn't answer my query..

as i stated above,...

 

I use Wındows own Utılıty to take system ımages - Full System Backups - whıch are stored on an external drıve.

 

My questıon ıs thıs :

 

In case of dısk faılure would ı be able to restore such an ımage,on the new ınstalled hard dısk ??

 

Wıthout any problems ?

 

Thank you

 

Has anyone here done that successfully ? 


Windows 7,64 bit  -  Lenovo Laptop 


#4 hamluis

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Posted 28 February 2018 - 01:39 PM

I believe that most users will not use the native Windows Backup tools...since they are deemed inferior (IMO) to other backup solutions from 3d-party vendors.

 

https://www.howtogeek.com/239312/how-to-restore-system-image-backups-on-windows-7-8-and-10/

 

https://superuser.com/questions/230095/windows-7-backup-does-the-system-image-include-all-the-files-on-my-drive

 

Louis



#5 britechguy

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Posted 28 February 2018 - 02:27 PM

Backup and restore tools (even the Windows built in utility which, by the way, has been deprecated in Windows 8.1 and 10, Microsoft officially recommends using a 3rd party tool) can restore to any replacement disk in the system the backup was originally taken from provided it is at least the same size, or larger, than either the original drive (which is more likely) or, at the very least, the actual space that was taken up on the original drive that's gone.

 

None, to my knowledge, perform any kind of check to determine whether the HDD or SSD that is the target being restored to is the same drive that was in use when the image was taken.

 

If one is planning on replacing a HDD in the early process of failing, or just because one wants a bigger one, it's far easier to clone the existing hard drive to its replacement, expanding partitions if need be, and its just plug n' play.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

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#6 akepe

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Posted 28 February 2018 - 02:46 PM

Yes Louis i'm aware of that,but in my experience i've had no problems whatsoever the time i needed to restore an image,and therefore see no need to let go of something that's worked for me.

 

But thanks 

 

Julia


Edited by hamluis, 28 February 2018 - 03:55 PM.

Windows 7,64 bit  -  Lenovo Laptop 


#7 akepe

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Posted 28 February 2018 - 02:59 PM

Backup and restore tools (even the Windows built in utility which, by the way, has been deprecated in Windows 8.1 and 10, Microsoft officially recommends using a 3rd party tool) can restore to any replacement disk in the system the backup was originally taken from provided it is at least the same size, or larger, than either the original drive (which is more likely) or, at the very least, the actual space that was taken up on the original drive that's gone.

 

None, to my knowledge, perform any kind of check to determine whether the HDD or SSD that is the target being restored to is the same drive that was in use when the image was taken.

 

If one is planning on replacing a HDD in the early process of failing, or just because one wants a bigger one, it's far easier to clone the existing hard drive to its replacement, expanding partitions if need be, and its just plug n' play.

 

'' If one is planning on replacing a HDD in the early process of failing, or just because one wants a bigger one, it's far easier to clone the existing hard drive to its replacement, expanding partitions if need be, and its just plug n' play.''

 

 

Thank you very much for the useful reply britechguy,

 

i'm aware that the Windows built in utility has been deprecated in Windows 8.1 and 10,but i'm still in W.7 so i'm good for the time being.

 

Could you please give me step by step instructions on how to perform the cloning including any utilities i'll need,as i've never done this before,  so have no experience in the matter,

 

Thanks 

 

Julia 


Edited by hamluis, 28 February 2018 - 03:54 PM.

Windows 7,64 bit  -  Lenovo Laptop 


#8 britechguy

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Posted 28 February 2018 - 04:16 PM

Julia,

 

         I cannot give you step-by-step instructions for two reasons:

 

1.  Exactly how this is done varies by the software chosen.

 

2.  I don't do it often enough to have ingrained it.  I always look at the step-by-step instructions, usually online and with screen captures, of the product I'm using.

 

The three I've used most recently are EaseUS To Do Backup Free, which has two different cloning options.  The straight Clone option is what most people would think of when that term is used.  You select one disk drive as the source and duplicate it, perfectly, to another.  They also have a System Clone option that only clones the C: drive (usually, it will determine what partition on which you have Windows installed), ignoring the recovery partitions and any other partitions you may have on the given drive along with the C: drive (or whichever drive letter holds Windows [and most often all the user data, too, unless you've done the work to change where that goes].  If one has a machine that was upgraded from another version of Windows or certain types of resets were done you can end up with multiple recovery partitions and if you want to ditch them the System Clone option will let you do so.  EaseUS To Do Backup is also my chosen system image backup tool on all my machines. 

 

For my last HDD clone I used Mini Tool Partition Wizard, and I discussed that in this topic:  MiniTool Partition Wizard - To the rescue for drive cloning (copying)

 

 

I've also used Miray HD Clone (and version 6 was the latest when I last used it).


Edited by britechguy, 28 February 2018 - 04:23 PM.

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#9 JohnC_21

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Posted 28 February 2018 - 06:21 PM

In case of dısk faılure would ı be able to restore such an ımage,on the new ınstalled hard dısk ??

 

Wıthout any problems ?

 

Has anyone here done that successfully ? 

 

I have used Windows 7 System Recovery without a problem. If you are replacing the drive you will need to create and boot a Windows 7 System Repair disk. Install the new drive, boot the disk with the external drive of your image attached and then select System Image Recovery. Third party software lets you manage your backups better than Windows 7.

 

6262597.png


Edited by JohnC_21, 28 February 2018 - 06:24 PM.


#10 akepe

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Posted 01 March 2018 - 03:48 AM

Julia,

 

         I cannot give you step-by-step instructions for two reasons:

 

1.  Exactly how this is done varies by the software chosen.

 

2.  I don't do it often enough to have ingrained it.  I always look at the step-by-step instructions, usually online and with screen captures, of the product I'm using.

 

The three I've used most recently are EaseUS To Do Backup Free, which has two different cloning options.  The straight Clone option is what most people would think of when that term is used.  You select one disk drive as the source and duplicate it, perfectly, to another.  They also have a System Clone option that only clones the C: drive (usually, it will determine what partition on which you have Windows installed), ignoring the recovery partitions and any other partitions you may have on the given drive along with the C: drive (or whichever drive letter holds Windows [and most often all the user data, too, unless you've done the work to change where that goes].  If one has a machine that was upgraded from another version of Windows or certain types of resets were done you can end up with multiple recovery partitions and if you want to ditch them the System Clone option will let you do so.  EaseUS To Do Backup is also my chosen system image backup tool on all my machines. 

 

For my last HDD clone I used Mini Tool Partition Wizard, and I discussed that in this topic:  MiniTool Partition Wizard - To the rescue for drive cloning (copying)

 

 

I've also used Miray HD Clone (and version 6 was the latest when I last used it).

 

 

 

Thanks for the explanation,Brian, You wrote that ''The three I've used most recently are EaseUS To Do Backup Free ''

 i have one question regarding your answer  Wouldn't download and installing EaseUS interfere with Windows own Backup Utility. ?

I assume that it would,..so to clone my system by downloading and installing  EaseUS,i'll have to give up Windows back up,isn't that right ?

 

 

The three I've used most recently are EaseUS To Do Backup Free


Windows 7,64 bit  -  Lenovo Laptop 


#11 akepe

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Posted 01 March 2018 - 04:24 AM

 

In case of dısk faılure would ı be able to restore such an ımage,on the new ınstalled hard dısk ??

 

Wıthout any problems ?

 

Has anyone here done that successfully ? 

 

I have used Windows 7 System Recovery without a problem. If you are replacing the drive you will need to create and boot a Windows 7 System Repair disk. Install the new drive, boot the disk with the external drive of your image attached and then select System Image Recovery. Third party software lets you manage your backups better than Windows 7.

 

6262597.png

 

 

Thank you for replying John,

Let me see if i got the sequence right :

1 -  boot a Windows 7 System Repair disk when the old drive still in place ???

2 -  Remove old disk,Install the new drive,

3 - boot the disk with the external drive of your image attached and then select System Image Recovery.?

And afterwards EVERYTHING gets done without any input from me ???

 

Thanks 

 

Julia


Edited by akepe, 01 March 2018 - 04:26 AM.

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#12 JohnC_21

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Posted 01 March 2018 - 08:16 AM

Actually this is the sequence.

 

Replace your hard drive.

Attach your external drive with the system image you want to recover

Boot the System Repair Disk

Select System Image Recovery

 

Follow the prompts. After the image is restored reboot and you should be good to go. 

 


Edited by JohnC_21, 01 March 2018 - 08:17 AM.


#13 akepe

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Posted 01 March 2018 - 08:33 AM

Actually this is the sequence.

 

Replace your hard drive.

Attach your external drive with the system image you want to recover

Boot the System Repair Disk

Select System Image Recovery

 

Follow the prompts. After the image is restored reboot and you should be good to go. 

 

 

Yes i though so as well,but wanted it clarified,to be certain.

Much appreciate your time and effort John.

Thank you.

Julia


Windows 7,64 bit  -  Lenovo Laptop 


#14 akepe

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Posted 01 March 2018 - 08:52 AM

 

Actually this is the sequence.

 

Replace your hard drive.

Attach your external drive with the system image you want to recover

Boot the System Repair Disk

Select System Image Recovery

 

Follow the prompts. After the image is restored reboot and you should be good to go. 

 

 

Yes i though so as well,but wanted it clarified,to be certain.

Much appreciate your time and effort John.

Thank you.

Julia

 

 

Another question if i may 

 

My current  HDD is a LENOVO OEM laptop

 

,i've  read that 

 

 '' maybe 3rd party software will solved all the migration OS and files, but its not good practice for OEM  laptops ''

 

Do you have an opinion on that ?

 

Thanks

 

Julia 


Windows 7,64 bit  -  Lenovo Laptop 


#15 britechguy

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Posted 01 March 2018 - 10:30 AM

Julia,

 

           You can have 20 different backup utilities on a single machine and none will interfere with or supplant the others.  Each can only restore from the backup format that it creates and uses.

 

           Given that the writing is on the wall for Windows 7 as a whole you would be much better to familiarize yourself with the third-party options for backup and restore that are out there so that you can choose the one that best suits you going forward.  Unless you intend to use an unsupported operating system you will be moving to either Windows 8.1, or more likely Windows 10, in just short of 2 years from now.  That's not a very long time.

 

            I tried AOMEI Backupper, Macrium Reflect, and EaseUS To Do and settled on the last one mostly because of the ease of use of the interface and the fact that I want others in my household to trigger their own backups.   Macrium Reflect is the Swiss Army knife of backup and restore utilities but the interface can be daunting.  Since I really needed ease of use as my first priority it lost out.  But Macrium Reflect can be installed such that the recovery environment for it is presented to you at boot time, which is really nice since you don't need external media to access it.   Since my need to actually recover/restore is very, very infrequent (while some people do it all the time, doing a lot of experimenting on their computers and wanting to bring them back to their last known and favored state quickly) I didn't have a strong desire to keep that particular feature.

 

            And I will add, again, that if what you're trying to do is to replace your existing hard drive with a larger one or an SSD or just another HDD because you have seen certain signs of possible impending failure, it is far easier to clone your existing drive to its replacement before removing it from the machine and then just "plug n' play" the newly cloned drive.


Edited by britechguy, 01 March 2018 - 10:33 AM.
Final note on cloning

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 





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