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Looking to Subscribe to a VPN


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#1 Computer3269

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Posted 26 February 2018 - 11:30 PM

Hello,

 

I was looking to subscribe to a VPN, and I wanted to know your experiences with the VPN Provider I found very convincing called PureVPN. Is it legit? Is it worth buying? How good is the technical support? How good are the streaming speed and protection I would get if I subscribed? I understand free VPNs are not good at all, so I would like to get my money's worth with a paid VPN. PureVPN is offering $129 for a 5-year subscription, which I found pretty enticing. For those of you who are more experienced with this matter, is this deal worth it and is PureVPN a reliable provider?

 

Thanks



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#2 Hareen

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Posted 27 February 2018 - 12:38 AM

I am using VPN Unlimited. It is good to date and the customer support to me is good.

 

I bought it at deals.bleepingcomputer.

 

MIne was a 4 machine deal. Now they are giving a 10 machine deal. Check it out. PureVPN is for 129$ for 5 years and this is 56$ for lifelong (at least a good long 50 years). Also, there are other deals for the same product.

 

Just give a trial first. If you like it then go for whatever product you like.


Edited by Hareen, 27 February 2018 - 12:38 AM.


#3 Computer3269

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Posted 27 February 2018 - 02:56 AM

Is deals.bleepingcomputer affiliated with this bleeping computer website? I thought it was a fake website at first trying to sell me something. 



#4 Platypus

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Posted 27 February 2018 - 03:32 AM

deals.bleepingcomputer.com is Bleeping Computer's legitimate subforum for deals negotiated by the site management.

 

To be doubly sure you arrive at the correct place, you can start from the Main Page:

 

https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/

 

and link from there to Deals, the third option from the right, next to Forums.


Top 5 things that never get done:

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#5 magiclcj

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Posted 17 April 2018 - 11:33 AM

Once you find one or two you are interested in, I suggest checking out https://thatoneprivacysite.net/vpn-comparison-chart/ He has a nifty chart comparing just how private each vpn is including some in-depth information. As a matter of fact you might start there as well as looking for deals. I found a lifetime subscription to windscribe through https://deals.geeky-gadgets.com/ Check there as well!



#6 Phantom010

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Posted 17 April 2018 - 02:32 PM

I see very few legitimate reasons to use a VPN or Proxy servers. Some reasons might be legitimate, but others are downright paranoia. They offer a false sense of security. Most of those services claim they don't keep logs of your online activity. Why? What would you want to hide anyway, assuming what you are doing is "legal"? Some VPN companies claim they're in countries where the law doesn't require them to keep logs, like in the Cayman Islands for instance. Would you really trust a company hiding in such a place with your sensitive data? 
 

 
A word of caution about VPNs
 

With a VPN, it's true your ISP may no longer have access to your browsing data, but the VPN provider now does. Some VPNs even sell that data to third parties, just like your ISP may or may not do, so in that way you could be right back where you started. That's why you should be especially cautious of "free" VPNs. Those services still have to make money, and chances are your data is the primary revenue source. That said, the VPN's terms may be more favorable to your privacy than, say, Comcast's. However, if you want to play things safer, you're better off paying for a VPN. 

Some paid VPNs still log user data, which just means any subpoena would pass from your ISP to the VPN provider. That said, it's likely be harder for law enforcement to get that data if your VPN isn't local to your country. 

In summary: If you're concerned about privacy for any reason, using a VPN is a great option — just make sure you read the fine print of the VPN provider you go with. And don't always take their word for it — some VPN providers claim they don't keep logs on user data, but third parties have discovered evidence that they actually do

There are many other precautions you can take to protect your privacy online besides using a VPN. One is the privacy-centric browser Tor, which hides your traffic by rerouting it through a series of nodes, each of which can only see parts of your IP address, making it extremely difficult to track users. Tor is free to use. The Tor Project, the non-profit that builds the browser, is funded mostly through grants and donations.

 

 

https://mashable.com/2018/02/13/why-you-need-vpn/#S2cLTSy5nSqF

 
Don't use VPN services.

No, seriously, don't. You're probably reading this because you've asked what VPN service to use, and this is the answer.

Note: The content in this post does not apply to using VPN for their intended purpose; that is, as a virtual private (internal) network. It only applies to using it as a glorified proxy, which is what every third-party "VPN provider" does.

(A Russian translation of this article can be found here, contributed by Timur Demin.)

Why not?

Because a VPN in this sense is just a glorified proxy. The VPN provider can see all your traffic, and do with it what they want - including logging.

But my provider doesn't log!

There is no way for you to verify that, and of course this is what a malicious VPN provider would claim as well. In short: the only safe assumption is that every VPN provider logs.

And remember that it is in a VPN provider's best interest to log their users - it lets them deflect blame to the customer, if they ever were to get into legal trouble. The $10/month that you're paying for your VPN service doesn't even pay for the lawyer's coffee, so expect them to hand you over.

But a provider would lose business if they did that!

I'll believe that when HideMyAss goes out of business. They gave up their users years ago, and this was widely publicized. The reality is that most of their customers will either not care or not even be aware of it.

But I pay anonymously, using Bitcoin/PaysafeCard/Cash/drugs!

Doesn't matter. You're still connecting to their service from your own IP, and they can log that.

But I want more security!

VPNs don't provide security. They are just a glorified proxy.

But I want more privacy!

VPNs don't provide privacy, with a few exceptions (detailed below). They are just a proxy. If somebody wants to tap your connection, they can still do so - they just have to do so at a different point (ie. when your traffic leaves the VPN server).

But I want more encryption!

Use SSL/TLS and HTTPS (for centralized services), or end-to-end encryption (for social or P2P applications). VPNs can't magically encrypt your traffic - it's simply not technically possible. If the endpoint expects plaintext, there is nothing you can do about that.

When using a VPN, the only encrypted part of the connection is from you to the VPN provider. From the VPN provider onwards, it is the same as it would have been without a VPN. And remember, the VPN provider can see and mess with all your traffic.

But I want to confuse trackers by sharing an IP address!

Your IP address is a largely irrelevant metric in modern tracking systems. Marketers have gotten wise to these kind of tactics, and combined with increased adoption of CGNAT and an ever-increasing amount of devices per household, it just isn't a reliable data point anymore.

Marketers will almost always use some kind of other metric to identify and distinguish you. That can be anything from a useragent to a fingerprinting profile. A VPN cannot prevent this.

So when should I use a VPN?

There are roughly two usecases where you might want to use a VPN:

  1. You are on a known-hostile network (eg. a public airport WiFi access point, or an ISP that is known to use MITM), and you want to work around that.
  2. You want to hide your IP from a very specific set of non-government-sanctioned adversaries - for example, circumventing a ban in a chatroom or preventing anti-piracy scareletters.

In the second case, you'd probably just want a regular proxy specifically for that traffic - sending all of your traffic over a VPN provider (like is the default with almost every VPN client) will still result in the provider being able to snoop on and mess with your traffic.

However, in practice, just don't use a VPN provider at all, even for these cases.

So, then... what?

If you absolutely need a VPN, and you understand what its limitations are, purchase a VPS and set up your own. I will not recommend any specific providers (diversity is good!), but there are plenty of cheap ones to be found on LowEndBox.

But how is that any better than a VPN service?

A VPN provider specifically seeks out those who are looking for privacy, and who may thus have interesting traffic. Statistically speaking, it is more likely that a VPN provider will be malicious or a honeypot, than that an arbitrary generic VPS provider will be.

So why do VPN services exist? Surely they must serve some purpose?

Because it's easy money. You just set up OpenVPN on a few servers, and essentially start reselling bandwidth with a markup. You can make every promise in the world, because nobody can verify them. You don't even have to know what you're doing, because again, nobody can verify what you say. It is 100% snake-oil.

So yes, VPN services do serve a purpose - it's just one that benefits the provider, not you.

 

 

 

https://gist.github.com/joepie91/5a9909939e6ce7d09e29



#7 JohnnyJammer

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Posted 17 April 2018 - 05:24 PM

I would disagree with the above post and the reason being, in Australia we have had new data retention laws which stipulates that the gov and ISP's have access to all data leaving any phone and or PC/Server for 2 years now.

We know this has been happening int he USA since 9/11 and even so here with the signals directorate but the thing is we just want privacy and as long as you dont have WebRTC running you are normally safe enough with a VPN/proxy service.

 

Personally im with privateinternetaccess, i find them cheap, handy little app and "apparently" they dont keep logs but as shown before when push comes to shove some of these companies do in fact keep logs.

 

On another note, i have needed to fire up my VPN and bypass the IPX in australia (Sydney)_ when steam bombed out. All i did was connect to Singapore and bingo my steam came up and i was running as normal as where most on my friends list had to wait till the next day for their steam to connect.



#8 Phantom010

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Posted 17 April 2018 - 05:47 PM

I've seen very few people actually using VPN's and Proxy servers for security or privacy reasons. Most popular reasons are Netflix USA and other streaming services, circumventing censorship imposed by certain countries, circumventing school and company Internet restrictions, and downloading copyrighted material. VPN providers know these things and aren't scrupulous about it one bit... Makes me wonder why they would be scrupulous about using my private data, or even keeping it private...


Edited by Phantom010, 17 April 2018 - 05:48 PM.


#9 JohnnyJammer

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Posted 17 April 2018 - 10:23 PM

I've seen very few people actually using VPN's and Proxy servers for security or privacy reasons. Most popular reasons are Netflix USA and other streaming services, circumventing censorship imposed by certain countries, circumventing school and company Internet restrictions, and downloading copyrighted material. VPN providers know these things and aren't scrupulous about it one bit... Makes me wonder why they would be scrupulous about using my private data, or even keeping it private...

I'll try and explain it so you can understand why some people do use VPN's and random browser GUID generators.

 

Ok so you get pulled over by the cops, they do a swab test and find you have marijuana in your system

No worries i only smoked 2 cones the night before , im no drug addict i just cant drink booze because it makes me sick.....i know for a fact im not high because thatw as 12 hours ago.

 

This might goto to courtbut before it does the cops will try and build a character case on you by pulling all your meta data (They can do this with out any questioning here in queensland, infact a cop did this to his ex-wife and stalked her and he didnt get charged!) , it also just happens that you have been watching "How to grow dope" videos so now not only will your house get raided the cops now will use this info in court to try and get a stronger sentence against you and they might even shoot your dog while they raid the house (Once again this has happened over a $20 bag of weed ffs).

So the cops will start also using your porn history, how many times you read the online news and what articles you always read first, then they might seize your PC and god knows what they will install on it before returning it (This has happened before with cops installing malware on users PC's then handing them back, very well known).

 

I can go on and on and on but the simple fast that some of us just want privacy is being eroded by people who use the "If you have nothing to hide" crap, cops and lawyers will always want to find what they can and hammer you down with anything they can get their bloody hands on.



#10 Romulus89

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Posted 11 October 2018 - 10:54 AM

What does everyone think of TunnelBear? I use them just because I don't need a VPN 24/7 and from my noob perspective, their free plan is very generous.



#11 shelf life

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Posted 11 October 2018 - 07:22 PM

As pointed out already, below is a good starting point. The more unbiased data presented- the better decision you can make.

 

https://thatoneprivacysite.net/vpn-comparison-chart/


How Can I Reduce My Risk to Malware?


#12 Shazy

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Posted 12 October 2018 - 12:15 AM

have to tried Browsec VPN extension. It works well with Crome .



#13 signekjos

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Posted 14 October 2018 - 01:41 PM

I've tried multiple VPN's over the years, including Cyberghost, Hotspot Shield and PureVPN (of which all three happen to be my favorites, for different reasons).

The most important aspect is whether you're using VPN for privacy concerns, or if you're attempting to circumvent an IP block. Some VPNs (including Cyberghost) are known to log the stats of their users, meaning their search history can be traced if wanted. That is not true for Hotspot shield, albeit this service offers a lot less flexibility. HSS does not allow you to surf from nearly as many countries as CG and PureVPN. 

Then there's the price aspect. As you pointed out, some offer huge discounts if you pay a year in advance.

Here are my recommendations:

If speed matters: Hotspot Shield
If flexibility matters: Cyberghost (given you don't care if people trace you)
If the price matters: Definitely go with PureVPN

PS: You can also use the tor browser together with the VPN if your goal is to truly mask all activity. 

 

Hope this helps.

Signe.
Web programmer at forbrukslån.no



#14 Replicator

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Posted 15 October 2018 - 09:38 AM

Mullvad....

 

Google it!


The quieter you become, the more you are able to hear!
CEH, CISSP @ WhiteHat Computers Pty Ltd

 


#15 Moogera

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Posted 15 October 2018 - 11:46 AM

I took out a short term subscription with Nord VPN however I've had poor results,800kb download on a 220mb Fibre line

Fair play they've been trying all-sorts to sort it out, customer service is very good,reply within 24h but no matter which option they give me to try the download speed is always between 600-800 kB

I cannot recommend Nord




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