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40 Degrees 6 months


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#1 OldPhil

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Posted 26 February 2018 - 01:17 PM

I let my laptop go for 6 months with out hitting it with some air, temp was showing 152f after a decent blast now sitting at 112f.  Dust coming out was bearly noticeable but temp drop was dramatic.


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#2 mjd420nova

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Posted 26 February 2018 - 04:43 PM

Maybe the blast dislodged something that was blocking the air flow.



#3 DavisMcCarn

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Posted 26 February 2018 - 04:53 PM

Neither temp will cause you problems; but, I, too, also see dramatic temp drops after blowing the dust out.


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#4 Havachat

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Posted 27 February 2018 - 03:25 AM

Maybe you dislodged a Huge Part to give some clearance and airflow.

I still prefer to Strip Down and see for myself inside and then clean thoroughly.



#5 OldPhil

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Posted 27 February 2018 - 06:55 AM

This post was all about drawing attention to what not much dust can do to temps, this LT lives in a very clean environment with all functions monitored quite frequently.  I deliberately let the temps climb to a safe but higher then clean state to demonstrate to the ones that don't know enough to take the very few minutes to do minor maintenance.  Normally my two LT's and my tower get a blast every three months, this the first cycle that went above about 130f.  I am hoping more NoBe's take note to take decent care for there stuff!


Edited by OldPhil, 27 February 2018 - 08:21 AM.

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#6 The-Toolman

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Posted 27 February 2018 - 07:58 AM

Hey OldPhil,

 

Yep it doesn't matter how clean of an environment a computer is used in they seem to attract the dust so I give my desktops a good cleaning twice a year with the air hose.

 

I'm amazed at how much dust can accumulate inside my desktops in a clean environment.


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#7 Mike_Walsh

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Posted 27 February 2018 - 08:19 AM

Yep it doesn't matter how clean of an environment a computer is used in they seem to attract the dust so I give my desktops a good cleaning twice a year with the air hose.

 

I'm amazed at how much dust can accumulate inside my desktops in a clean environment.

 

I guess it's probably static electric which attracts the dust. Mine, too, get a 'spring-clean' every 6 months or so.....and the CPUs come off and get the TIM replaced once a year, whether they need it or not.

 

We live in an old house with hot-air central heating. Although we house-clean very regularly, you would not believe the amount of dust that comes out of the hot air vents..... 

 

And it seems to get absolutely everywhere..! 5v7Fbz8.gif

 

 

Mike.  :wink:


Edited by Mike_Walsh, 27 February 2018 - 06:16 PM.

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#8 DavisMcCarn

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Posted 27 February 2018 - 08:34 AM

If an Intel CPU hits 100c (212f), it will rudely turn off the PC.  AMD CPU's get excited at about 95c (203f).  Your temps were still well below that before you cleaned it out; but I have seen over a 45c (113f) drop in more than one laptop when I cleaned it.


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#9 hamluis

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Posted 27 February 2018 - 08:34 AM

Not recommended by me...but my own desktop systems have had the covers off for years now (personal preference) and I find that any problems arising from dust can be minimized by just periodically brushing the fan blades and using canned "air" to blow out the interior, including all fans.

 

In my case, "periodically" means whenever I feel that it's the right time...I don't keep track of when or how often, I consider this just a basic maintenance task.

 

Louis



#10 britechguy

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Posted 27 February 2018 - 01:04 PM

I've seen some immediately noticeable changes when a computer (whether desktop or laptop) has been cleaned of dust, too.

 

I am the site's contrarian when it comes to overreaction to even the slightest temperature change above what a machine has when first run.   All designers know that most (and, yes, I do mean most) machines will never see a single cleaning during their service lives, which is typically years long.  No one was ever coming around and cleaning the PCs at any workplace I've been in, from the largest of corporations in the telecommunications world [at least at the time], to small offices in schools.  Yet these computers continued to do their jobs, day in and day out, for a very, very long time.

 

Unless you're getting within 10°C of maximum I don't even start worrying, and even then if it's a spike I definitely don't worry.  Even briefly going above the maximum operating temperature (as opposed to the critical temperature) only prompts me to suggest people vacuum their air intakes and exhausts and the CPU heatsink area in a desktop, or blow out the laptop from the intake side with canned air.   I never expect that the result will be the same as brand spankin' new since there will still be some dust clinging here and there.

 

These devices where designed to handle what is "average care," which is generally no care.  People go into panics on this site on a regular basis about temperatures that are so far below maximum that it's almost laughable.  If you're having actual temperature related problems it becomes very obvious very quickly.

 

None of the above means that I don't suggest that people do occasional housekeeping/dusting on their machines, but I am doing everything I can to quell the unnecessary panic about temperatures that are perfectly within normal limits and nowhere near to anything that would cause a machine to actually throttle/shut down.


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#11 DavisMcCarn

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Posted 27 February 2018 - 02:37 PM

I have been fixing PC's since 1976 and had a repair shop for 18 years where we performed over 105,000 repairs.  Personally, I started using an electric leaf blower on desktop PC's over 20 years ago; but, still use canned blow-off on laptops.  The trick; though, is to blow in the opposite direction from the fans. 

On desktops, blow in through the back of the power supply which will blow the dust out of the front of the power supply (or the bottom if that's where the vents are).  Then blow underneath of the heatsink fan which will blow the dust upwards through the fan.  Blow then out through the front of the PC.

Most laptops have a visible exhaust vent on the rear side or back of the laptop (they're behind the display hinge on a MacBook.)  Use a can of blow-off to blow in through that vent (or those vents on some) and the dust will come out wherever it has intake (Macbooks seem to bow the dust up through the keyboard!).

If I take either apart, I will also use a 1 1/2 inch brush to loosen the coating of dust on the fan blades and then hit it with the blower again.


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#12 The-Toolman

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Posted 27 February 2018 - 03:03 PM

All designers know that most (and, yes, I do mean most) machines will never see a single cleaning during their service lives, which is typically years long.

I've seen computers so full of dust that the fan blades weren't even visible let alone even spin.

 

Amazing.


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#13 britechguy

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Posted 27 February 2018 - 03:25 PM

 

All designers know that most (and, yes, I do mean most) machines will never see a single cleaning during their service lives, which is typically years long.

I've seen computers so full of dust that the fan blades weren't even visible let alone even spin.

 

Amazing.

 

 

And they continue to work, which is even more amazing!!

 

I find the obsession with absolute minimum temperature, rather than acceptably within normal limits, to be the equivalent of "white glove" housekeeping.  I am not a white glove housekeeper and never will be.  There are not only better things to do with my time, but those things actually affect either my day-to-day life or my mental wellbeing (or both).  [Although I'll be the first to add a cleaner home would probably add at least a bit to my mental health, but, priorities, priorities!]


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

     Presenting the willfully ignorant with facts is the very definition of casting pearls before swine.

             ~ Brian Vogel

 

 

 

              

 


#14 Mike_Walsh

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Posted 27 February 2018 - 06:28 PM

@britechguy:-

 

I find the obsession with absolute minimum temperature, rather than acceptably within normal limits, to be the equivalent of "white glove" housekeeping.  I am not a white glove housekeeper and never will be.  There are not only better things to do with my time, but those things actually affect either my day-to-day life or my mental wellbeing (or both).  [Although I'll be the first to add a cleaner home would probably add at least a bit to my mental health, but, priorities, priorities!]

 

 

I wouldn't describe myself as obsessive about temps (far from it), although like anybody with a grain of sense, I do keep an eye on 'em.

 

I'm actually astounded at how CPUs continue to function at temperatures which would cause you or I to yelp in pain.....and then some.

 

Let me just say this; my old Dell lappie, in the early days (before I knew much about the 'tech' side of things, and upgraded from the old single-core Celeron it was 'blessed' with initially), went through the installation of the XP SP3 service pack running at well over 70C for at least a couple of hours. For a 'NetBurst' Cellie, that was bloody close to its limits.....and the exhaust vent at the back was doing a fair approximation of a hot-air paint stripper! Yet for years afterwards, it continued to chug away quite happily.....despite the handicap of Dell's well-known (at that time) crappy 'thermal solution'..!

 

I've nowt against Intel CPUs, although I'm a confirmed AMD man (just personal preference, really).....but I've nothing but respect for that old Celeron. I never chucked it out, even after upgrading to a 'proper' P4. It sits in a special little box in my bedside cabinet; been there for years.

 

(And it amuses me how, in spite of all the maundering by some folks about how AMDs always run hot, that this old Athlon 64 X2 dual-core barely ever breaks a sweat. Even when transcoding videos, it never exceeds 50C.....and it doesn't have the benefit of many of the more up-to-date instruction sets that most CPUs now take for granted. To me, that's pretty impressive.)

 

 

Mike.  :wink:


Edited by Mike_Walsh, 27 February 2018 - 06:36 PM.

Distros:- Multiple 'Puppies'..... and Anti-X 16.1

My Puppy BLOG ~~~  My Puppy PACKAGES

Compaq Presario SR1916UK; Athlon64 X2 3800+, 3 GB RAM, WD 500GB Caviar 'Blue', 32GB Kingspec PATA SSD, 3 TB Seagate 'Expansion' external HDD, ATI Radeon Xpress 200 graphics, Dell 15.1" pNp monitor (1024 x 768), TP-Link PCI-e USB 3.0 card, Logitech c920 HD Pro webcam, self-powered 7-port USB 2.0 hub

Dell Inspiron 1100; 2.6 GHz 400FSB P4, 1.5 GB RAM, 64GB KingSpec IDE SSD, Intel 'Extreme' graphics, 1 TB Seagate 'Expansion' external HDD, M$ HD-3000 'Lifecam'.

 

KXhaWqy.gifFQ8nrJ3.gif

 

 


#15 The-Toolman

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Posted 27 February 2018 - 09:01 PM

My old Pentium D 820 Smithfield processor using the stock HSF always ran at maximum rated temperature and then sometimes 10 degrees above that and never complained.

 

Pentium processors were built to run hot and last forever. :thumbup2:


I'm grumpy because I can be not because I'm old.

 

The world is what you make of it, if it doesn't fit, you make alterations.

 

Under certain circumstances, profanity provides a relief denied even to prayer.  (Mark Twain)





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