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'Reset' vs 'Fresh Start' vs 'Fresh Install'


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#1 j_bins

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Posted 23 February 2018 - 07:51 AM

Hi,

 

I am looking at ways to reinstall Windows 10. I took the free upgrade from Win 8.1 so I don' tknow if that will have any bearing on my decision? I don't mind loosing my Apps and Data. Which method do you think would be the most thorough?

 

 

Reset: Settings > Recovery > Reset this PC  OR Use 'Media Creation Tool' to creat a bootable USB then Reset from that.

Fresh Start: Windows Defender > Fresh Start

Fresh Install: use 'Media Creation Tool' to create a bootable USB and perform a 'Fresh Install' from that?

 

It seems like Microsoft is trying to make the process of reinstalling Windows much simpler.....but there does seem to be quite a few options.....Which would you choose?

 

:)

 

 

 

 



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#2 mikey11

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Posted 23 February 2018 - 08:46 AM

if you dont have any programs, files, or documents that you need on the computer then a fresh install is the way to go



#3 britechguy

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Posted 23 February 2018 - 09:23 AM

If you don't mind losing your apps and data then the "cleanest of the clean" ways is Doing a Completely Clean Install of Windows 10.  You have control over what happens with regard to your drive before even installing using this method.

 

A Reset with the "keep nothing" option is, in all likelihood, effectively the same.  If I'm not mistaken, and I could be, "Fresh Start" is, for all practical intents and purposes, a Reset with the "keep nothing" option.  Even web searches turn up nothing really definitive regarding any differences and it's entirely like Microsoft to give multiple methods to accomplish precisely the same end.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#4 JohnC_21

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Posted 23 February 2018 - 11:26 AM

From my understanding a reset with the option to keep your files or the option to wipe the files will keep you at the same version. A Fresh Start uses an internet connection to download the latest version of Windows and then reinstalls it, keeping your personal files. Downloading the latest version of Windows 10 using the media creation tool and doing a clean install would wipe everything.



#5 j_bins

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Posted 26 February 2018 - 02:50 PM

Thanks to you all for your input. Sounds like a fresh install is the way to go using MCT. I don't have any partitions on the OS Hard Drive so I will probably skip te Dispart bit and just install.

 

Even web searches turn up nothing really definitive regarding any differences

 

Thats exactly what I was finding :)

 

 

 

 

#6 j_bins

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Posted 01 April 2018 - 08:01 AM

If you don't mind losing your apps and data then the "cleanest of the clean" ways is Doing a Completely Clean Install of Windows 10.  You have control over what happens with regard to your drive before even installing using this method.

 

A Reset with the "keep nothing" option is, in all likelihood, effectively the same.  If I'm not mistaken, and I could be, "Fresh Start" is, for all practical intents and purposes, a Reset with the "keep nothing" option.  Even web searches turn up nothing really definitive regarding any differences and it's entirely like Microsoft to give multiple methods to accomplish precisely the same end.

 

I finally got around to doing the fresh install following your guide. Worked a treat. :) :) Thanks. Would recommend this to anyone who wants to give their computer a fresh start.

 

:)



#7 QQQQ

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Posted 01 April 2018 - 08:49 AM

If you don't mind losing your apps and data then the "cleanest of the clean" ways is Doing a Completely Clean Install of Windows 10.  You have control over what happens with regard to your drive before even installing using this method.

 

A Reset with the "keep nothing" option is, in all likelihood, effectively the same.  If I'm not mistaken, and I could be, "Fresh Start" is, for all practical intents and purposes, a Reset with the "keep nothing" option.  Even web searches turn up nothing really definitive regarding any differences and it's entirely like Microsoft to give multiple methods to accomplish precisely the same end.

I recently re installed Windows 10 due to some recurring issues I had using the reset keep nothing option. The install went fine but I noticed some registry entries referring to an unknown SID that was part of the problem I was having that prompted me to reinstall in the first place. Reinstalled again but formatted the drive first, lesson learned. Evidently the keep nothing option actually kept some registry settings, just FYI.



#8 britechguy

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Posted 01 April 2018 - 09:58 AM

 

If you don't mind losing your apps and data then the "cleanest of the clean" ways is Doing a Completely Clean Install of Windows 10.  You have control over what happens with regard to your drive before even installing using this method.

 

A Reset with the "keep nothing" option is, in all likelihood, effectively the same.  If I'm not mistaken, and I could be, "Fresh Start" is, for all practical intents and purposes, a Reset with the "keep nothing" option.  Even web searches turn up nothing really definitive regarding any differences and it's entirely like Microsoft to give multiple methods to accomplish precisely the same end.

I recently re installed Windows 10 due to some recurring issues I had using the reset keep nothing option. The install went fine but I noticed some registry entries referring to an unknown SID that was part of the problem I was having that prompted me to reinstall in the first place. Reinstalled again but formatted the drive first, lesson learned. Evidently the keep nothing option actually kept some registry settings, just FYI.

 

 

 

Interesting, and vital, data point.  Thanks for sharing.

 

One wonders if the "Fresh Start" option would result in anything different with regard to the registry?

 

In any case, the completely clean install appears to do the trick of absolutely starting from scratch.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 





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