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best basic CAD for linux?


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#1 Achaemenid

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Posted 21 February 2018 - 08:45 AM

I want to learn CAD for architecture but I think a prerequisite would be basic CAD.

 

There are tons of programs out there. I am researching and looking for some personal opinions.

 

In the Linux Mint 18.3 repository:

 

FreeCAD

 

Openscad (I don't understand what they mean by "script file based graphical CAD environment." Is this a full CAD program?)

 

Alliance (VLSI CAD tools)

 

Oce-Draw (OpenCASCADE Community Edition

 

Anybody with personal experience have an opinion?

 

 



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#2 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 21 February 2018 - 07:14 PM

I can't speak for the others but Openscad is a 3-D program for designing for a 3-D printer.

 

I haven't used it a great deal but it is very accurate because it works with dimensions that you input, rather than generating a shape which you then manipulate to the dimensions you want. It is not hugely difficult to use but definitely has a learning curve !  I do not believe it would be of much use in the architectural field but it is an excllent package for designing 3-D objects.

 

Chris Cosgrove



#3 RecursiveNerd

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Posted 21 February 2018 - 10:50 PM

If you're just looking for a 2D modelling program, QCAD is a nice program that is fairly easy to learn and quite powerful when it comes to creating 2D designs. Another 2D alternative would be LibreCAD.

 

If you're looking for 3D modelling, then you're going to be best served with FreeCAD. With that said, in my experience, those in the industry use AutoCAD, which is not a free application.



#4 Achaemenid

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Posted 22 February 2018 - 06:20 AM

If you're just looking for a 2D modelling program, QCAD is a nice program that is fairly easy to learn and quite powerful when it comes to creating 2D designs. Another 2D alternative would be LibreCAD.

 

If you're looking for 3D modelling, then you're going to be best served with FreeCAD. With that said, in my experience, those in the industry use AutoCAD, which is not a free application.

Thanks for this response.

Can you tell me the difference between 2D and 3D modelling. Is 3D modelling the ability to twirl a figure around and see it from all sides, whereas 2D would be just seeing a 2D drawing of an object?

I am aware of AutoCAD. In fact I have a 2007 edition, which would probably not be of much use now.  A current one would cost a zillion dollars however.



#5 RecursiveNerd

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Posted 22 February 2018 - 01:04 PM

2D is simply that, 2-Dimensional. Therefore, all drawings done will be in the XY coordinate system, such as if you were to do the drawing yourself using graphing paper or some other sort of grid paper. If you were to hold that piece of paper up on it's side, you wouldn't be able to see any of the drawing.

 

3D gives you a drawing in the XYZ coordinate space, where you can add depth and gain the ability to view the object as it would appear in the real world.

 

To have a simple example: Imagine placing a perfectly round ball on a table. If you are looking at that ball perpendicular to the table (i.e. from the ceiling), you only see a circle because the ball appears flat. However, standing at the table and looking down at the ball, you are able to perceive it as more than just a circle because of the angle in which you are looking at it (the Z space).

 

And yes, AutoCAD is not cheap (about $1,400 for a single individual user).



#6 Achaemenid

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Posted 23 February 2018 - 12:02 PM


And yes, AutoCAD is not cheap (about $1,400 for a single individual user).

 

Thanks for this response.

 

Actually 1400 is not as bas as I thought.



#7 RecursiveNerd

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Posted 23 February 2018 - 01:56 PM

 


And yes, AutoCAD is not cheap (about $1,400 for a single individual user).

 

Thanks for this response.

 

Actually 1400 is not as bas as I thought.

 

 

Keep in mind that there is no way to buy a perpetual license (i.e. buy it once and never pay again). Their software is on a subscription based model that you have to pay yearly.



#8 rp88

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Posted 24 February 2018 - 05:19 PM

Blender is good, but not really CAD, more 3d modelling for animation though it does contain 3d printing tools and an stl exporter. Sketchup can be made to run under wine, and there is an export path from it to blender using a few free tools*, I do this often and it works very well. There is also freeCAD which I haven't personally used but has an interface supposedly similar to most of autodesk's (makers of autoCAD, inventor...) products. Autodesks's stuff apparently doesn't usually run well under wine.

Openscad does scripted models only, you don't model so much as type code which compiles to make shapes. It's ok for mathematically defined parts like worm gears but you'll probably want to export the stl files from it then import them into another tool to make all the other parts of your models.

*the export path I worked out is described at the link below, hopefully it works for later versions of sketchup than version 8 but I haven't upgraded sketchup beyond version 8, I just keep the old installer exe files to hand. http://www.instructables.com/id/Sketchup-3D-modelling-file-conversion-and-advice-/ scroll to near the bottom for the bit's you'll want. Apologies for the bad writing in it, I made that tutorial ages ago and in a rush at the time. For info on installing sketchup on ubuntu based (including mint) linux distros look at https://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/sketchup-ubuntu-xerus.html .

Edited by rp88, 24 February 2018 - 05:24 PM.

Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB

#9 Achaemenid

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Posted 11 April 2018 - 01:43 AM

Blender is good, .... Apologies for the bad writing in it, I made that tutorial ages ago and in a rush at the time. For info on installing sketchup on ubuntu based (including mint) linux distros look at https://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/sketchup-ubuntu-xerus.html .


Thanks for this rundown of various programs.

I am focusing on freecad for now.




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