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dc every several min, tech support says nothing wrong - what is it??


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#1 tiredofslowinternet

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Posted 19 February 2018 - 05:12 PM

so since early last year me and my household have been having issues with our internet where it would be completely fine and every 10 minutes or so it would disconnect. being a gamer this caused me a lot of stress over the year but I just dealt with it. however the feeling of annoyance has been building up until I finally decided to take action. I ran ping tests over the past several days and noticed I had packet loss every 3 or 5 minutes, or every 10-15 minutes, and rarely every hour or so, which was consistent with me disconnecting from Overwatch. not just Overwatch but webpages wouldn't load for a good 30-40 seconds and same thing with Discord messages.

 

it is not just me that has this problem but also our entire household, just that it affects me more. I just got off support with both Cox and Netgear and they both said nothing was wrong on their end or our router. when it's not disconnecting my ping and download speeds are both very good. this is just pissing me off. i don't think this is normal so any feedback would be appreciated


Edited by Chris Cosgrove, 19 February 2018 - 06:49 PM.
Moved from Win 10 to 'Networking'.


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#2 Orecomm

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Posted 19 February 2018 - 08:43 PM

One thing to check would be your router's DHCP timeouts. It sounds like you may be having trouble renewing your DHCP lease. This could be on the carrier side, which would be the router's Internet or Outside interface or DHCP Client settings, or on the inside (which is usually much easier to find and access) in your DHCP Server settings. Your system (or router) will begin asking for a refresh at one half the DHCP lease life, and will expire it's address when the timer runs out if it has not received an update. At least around here, cable modems are notoriously slow to get a DHCP response, and the default timers are often set way too low - 10 minutes or less on several that I have seen. Your outside may be locked down by your carrier, and if so the only option you may have is to ask for (and pay for) a Static IP. On the inside I usually use a timeout of 2 days (the router usually defaults to an hour or less). If you turn a device off and on it will grab a fresh lease anyway, so it really doesn't hurt much to extend your lease as long as you have plenty of leases available - most routers default to everything on the subnet except itself, so 252 unique DHCP requesting devices on your network. Even with a couple of teenagers at home you aren't likely to exhaust that in a couple of days. 

 

Another thing to check if you have some knowledge (or know someone who does) is to take a TCPdump (aka "Wireshark trace") on your computer for long enough to catch the "bump" and see if there is anything suspicious going on. A while back I had an HP printer go crazy generating thousands of ARP requests for it's own address per second and took down the entire local college campus network. That type of thing is hard to find any other way.



#3 tiredofslowinternet

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Posted 21 February 2018 - 03:41 PM

One thing to check would be your router's DHCP timeouts. It sounds like you may be having trouble renewing your DHCP lease. This could be on the carrier side, which would be the router's Internet or Outside interface or DHCP Client settings, or on the inside (which is usually much easier to find and access) in your DHCP Server settings. Your system (or router) will begin asking for a refresh at one half the DHCP lease life, and will expire it's address when the timer runs out if it has not received an update. At least around here, cable modems are notoriously slow to get a DHCP response, and the default timers are often set way too low - 10 minutes or less on several that I have seen. Your outside may be locked down by your carrier, and if so the only option you may have is to ask for (and pay for) a Static IP. On the inside I usually use a timeout of 2 days (the router usually defaults to an hour or less). If you turn a device off and on it will grab a fresh lease anyway, so it really doesn't hurt much to extend your lease as long as you have plenty of leases available - most routers default to everything on the subnet except itself, so 252 unique DHCP requesting devices on your network. Even with a couple of teenagers at home you aren't likely to exhaust that in a couple of days. 

 

Another thing to check if you have some knowledge (or know someone who does) is to take a TCPdump (aka "Wireshark trace") on your computer for long enough to catch the "bump" and see if there is anything suspicious going on. A while back I had an HP printer go crazy generating thousands of ARP requests for it's own address per second and took down the entire local college campus network. That type of thing is hard to find any other way.

 

thanks for your input. to be honest I barely understand any of that stuff but I googled some stuff online and found out the lease life is 24 hours. I don't really know if it will help but I compiled the information from an ipconfig /all into a pastebin. 

 

I don't really understand what the problem is or how I can fix it. I really feel like I'm at a loss here. I may take your second suggestion.



#4 Orecomm

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Posted 21 February 2018 - 05:48 PM

OK, so your router's internal DHCP lease time for devices on your LAN is one day, which should be just fine. The WAN DHCP timeout may be visible on your Netgear under the WAN settings or status, but a lot of routers don't expose this. One potential troubleshooting step would be to look at the WAN status - IP address, mask, gateway, and DNS - and set the interface as Static, using those values. This will probably tick off your ISP, but if you can run for 30 minutes without interruption you've probably found your problem. If not, set it back to "Automatic" or DHCP and we will look elsewhere.



#5 tiredofslowinternet

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Posted 21 February 2018 - 11:45 PM

OK, so your router's internal DHCP lease time for devices on your LAN is one day, which should be just fine. The WAN DHCP timeout may be visible on your Netgear under the WAN settings or status, but a lot of routers don't expose this. One potential troubleshooting step would be to look at the WAN status - IP address, mask, gateway, and DNS - and set the interface as Static, using those values. This will probably tick off your ISP, but if you can run for 30 minutes without interruption you've probably found your problem. If not, set it back to "Automatic" or DHCP and we will look elsewhere.

I did this: https://prnt.sc/ii36ge

 

ran for 20 min, no change



#6 Orecomm

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Posted 23 February 2018 - 11:43 AM

No change meaning you are still getting dropped every few minutes? Well, it eliminates DHCP as a possibility. My next test would be to connect a computer directly to the Internet port bypassing your router. Make sure your firewall is on, all sharing is off, and you're as locked down as you can be. Let the computer get a DHCP address from your carrier. Start a continuous ping (or other interactive use - not just watching a video which is pretty much one way) to some location (Google.com works). You can try your game, but that's a bit risky running "naked" on the Internet. Let it run a while and see what happens. Drop ? Your carrier has a problem you can't solve. No Drop ? Maybe your router.

 

I have an ancient laptop running Linux that I use just for this kind of testing as any device, particularly a PC, directly connected to the internet has a limited life expectancy. I just reload the OS from a USB stick after using it. Be careful.






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